D.C. Student Assignment Policy Proposal

D.C. officials propose new school boundary and student assignment policies that re-commit to the idea of neighborhood schools while redrawing boundaries and adding three new middle schools.

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Student Assignment and DCPS School Boundaries Review Process

DRAFT
Student Assignment Policy Proposal
Advisory Committee on Student Assignment

JUNE 2014 DRAFT PROPOSAL

Letter from Advisory Committee:
Dear Public School Families and other Community Members,
Our city is long overdue for an update of student
assignment policies, school boundaries, and
feeder patterns. The District has not undertaken a
comprehensive review of these issues since 1968.
In the decades since, our city has seen significant
population, educational, economic, and demographic
changes. Dozens of DC Public Schools (DCPS) have
closed; others have opened, moved locations, or
shifted program focus or grade levels. The District’s
charter school sector — established in 1996 —
now accounts for 44 percent of the public student
population and 58 different local education agencies.
Our city continues to change: our school age
population is expected to grow by nearly 50 percent
between now and 2022. While this is an exciting
time for our city, our school system must reflect and
respond to these changes to serve all DC students
and their families.
In October 2013, Deputy Mayor for Education
Abigail Smith appointed an Advisory Committee on
Student Assignment to examine the data, identify the
challenges, and propose solutions. As its members,
we were charged with making policy and planning
recommendations to the Mayor to improve clarity,
predictability, and equitable access to high quality
school options that make sense for families.
From the outset of the process, and throughout our
months of work, we reviewed newly commissioned
research and extensive data. Public input began in
November 2013 with focus group meetings held in
every ward of the city. Nearly 200 parents gave initial
input on student assignment and school choice
issues and provided feedback on the principles that
should guide policy and boundary changes.
After the focus group meetings, the Advisory
Committee developed three policy examples, which
the DME presented for public feedback at a series
of working group meetings held in April 2014. More
than 800 residents participated in the working group
meetings. In addition, over the past eight months,
the DME and many of us have participated in dozens
of local and school community meetings throughout
the city with hundreds of participants. We have
also received and responded to hundreds of e-mail
inquiries and suggestions.
Throughout this process, community members
expressed their frustration with a process primarily
focused on student assignment rather than on
school improvement. We understand this frustration,
and we are basing our recommendations on the
overwhelming input from parents and residents that
families want a citywide system of neighborhood
public schools that is invested in equitably and

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that provides predictable and fair access to high
quality schools in communities everywhere in this
city. We believe that improving how families access
public schools and clarifying DCPS attendance
zones and feeder pathways will help stabilize and
strengthen relationships between families, schools,
and communities, which will contribute to improving
schools.
The data-driven discussions and thoughtful and
spirited debate among stakeholders also made clear
that to advance this vision of a citywide system of
neighborhood public schools, the District would need
to:
• Improve transparency, coordination, and joint
planning between DCPS and public charter
schools and step up accountability for both.
• Reopen some closed DCPS neighborhoods
schools to account for population growth and
travel hardships.
• Increase investments across DCPS
neighborhood schools, particularly those serving
children with the greatest needs.
• Address travel burdens of students and families
to both DCPS and charter schools.
• Reduce the disruptive “churn” that takes places
as students transfer in large numbers among and
between DCPS and charter schools throughout
the school year.
This preliminary proposal represents our best effort
to find solutions based on an enormous amount
of data and public input. We release these draft
recommendations knowing full well they are not
perfect. In particular, we seek additional public
feedback on the proposed boundary changes
and feeder pathways. We also hope to secure
feedback to ensure that, as we emphasize a
citywide system of neighborhood schools, we
formulate the most effective strategies to preserve
and strengthen socioeconomic and racial diversity
in our schools and to ensure that all schools share
in the responsibility to educate our most at-risk
students. We invite you to share your insights and
perspectives to help us refine this proposal before
final recommendations are provided to the Mayor.
Let’s keep working together.
Sincerely,
The District of Columbia Advisory Committee on
Student Assignment

Advisory Committee on Student Assignment DRAFT Proposal

Basic Framework of this Proposal
The Advisory Committee based its proposal on the following principles:
• Predictable public school pathways for families.
• High quality schools of right in every neighborhood.
• Access to public school choices other than assigned schools.
• Walkable and safely accessible DCPS elementary schools.
• Diversity in student enrollment.
• Coherent and efficient citywide public school infrastructure.
To align with the principles identified above, the Advisory Committee proposes a core system of zoned
schools and geographically based feeder patterns from elementary through high school. Acknowledging
the limitations of a strictly neighborhood assignment system, the Advisory Committee also proposes a
complementary system of school choice to address inequities in access to program and school quality,
the need for diversity, and the desire of families to exercise personal preferences for school attendance.
For this system of neighborhood assignment and school choice to work for families and for the District,
the Advisory Committee also proposes that the city review and improve its planning and decisionmaking processes for school opening, closing, and locating, as well as for expanding or reducing
capacity and capital investment in both DCPS and public charter schools. Finally, the Advisory
Committee has identified where new DCPS schools and increased capacity are needed due to child
population pressures and travel hardships.
The proposed student assignment policies, boundaries, feeder patterns, and new schools will be phased
in over time to support smooth and effective transitions for families, schools, and communities.

Advisory Committee on Student Assignment DRAFT Proposal

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A Core System of Zoned DCPS Schools
Based on the community engagement process, there appears to be strong public support for a zoned
system of schools. Updating and clarifying geographical attendance zones will:
• Provide families predictable pathways at every grade level.
• Strengthen connections among families, communities, and schools, in support of school
improvement efforts.
In 2013-14, there were 74 DCPS elementary and PS-8th grade schools operating with 104 different
boundaries. Twenty-two percent of all public school students had rights to multiple schools because
the attendance zones were not aligned after school closings and consolidations. Many schools do not
have a clearly defined community for which they are responsible, and many families do not have obvious
pathways to their schools of right. In some cases, due to the consolidation of attendance zones, families
are assigned to schools that are not within walking distance of their home. In addition, there are school
boundaries with far more students than there is capacity, as well as boundaries with more capacity than
there are assigned students.
The updated elementary school attendance boundaries seek to:
• Clarify rights of families to schools and responsibilities of schools to families.
• Update school boundaries to align capacity, participation, and population.
• Minimize travel distances for families.
Currently, middle school boundaries do not align with the elementary schools that feed into them, and the
same is true for high schools and the middle schools that feed into them. This means a child can be inboundary for an elementary school, but out-of-boundary for the middle school that the elementary school
feeds into. Parents and community members felt strongly that classmates should be able to go through
school together, and educators expressed interest in vertical alignment of schools to ensure continuity
of academic programming. In addition, there are currently few opportunities for students in specialized
schools or programs to continue their academic programs when they advance to middle or high school.
The proposals for secondary school geographic attendance zones and feeder patterns, as well as
programmatic feeder patterns seek to:
• Encourage continuity of academic programming.
• Strengthen vertical alignment of schools (elementary through high school) to support both
programmatic continuity and enrollment stability.
• Provide the right for students who have attended school together to remain together.
• Foster greater economic, racial, and ethnic diversity in secondary schools.

Proposals for By-Right Access to DCPS Zoned Schools
1. Retain existing policy on attendance zones, which gives each student the right to attend a gradeappropriate school based on his/her place of residence.
2. Revise the obsolete and outdated boundaries that resulted from school closings and openings over the
last few decades. To see the proposed new boundaries by school, please visit dme.dc.gov/boundaries.
3. Middle school attendance zones shall be established by combining elementary attendance zones
designated to geographically feed into the middle school. To see the proposed new boundaries by
school, please visit dme.dc.gov/boundaries or see the Proposed Geographic Feeder Pathways at the end
of this document.
4. High school attendance zones shall be established by combining middle school or PS-8th grade zones
designated to geographically feed into the high school. To see the proposed new boundaries by school,
please visit dme.dc.gov/boundaries or see the Proposed Geographic Feeder Pathways at the end of this
document.

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Advisory Committee on Student Assignment DRAFT Proposal

5. DCPS elementary students shall have access by right to the middle school designated as a next-level
school in the geographic feeder pattern for the elementary school they complete, regardless of whether
the students live in the attendance zone of the designated middle school.
6. DCPS middle-grade students shall have access by right to the high school designated as a next-level
school in the geographic feeder pattern for the middle school they complete, regardless of whether the
students live in the attendance zone of the designated high school.
7. DCPS students shall have access by right to the designated next level school in the programmatic feeder
pattern for the specialized program/school they complete. See the Proposed Programmatic Feeder
Pathways at the end of this document.

Access to DCPS Early Childhood Education
The District of Columbia is a leader in early childhood education. Every DCPS elementary school offers
all-day PK4 classes, and all but six DCPS elementary schools have PK3 classrooms. Currently, entry to
early childhood programs is by lottery, with no prioritization of students based on need.
The proposals for access to DCPS pre-K programs seek to:
• Create opportunities by right for young learners who face risk factors so they can develop the skills
they will need to succeed in kindergarten and beyond.
• Create family investment at neighborhood schools, which will encourage sustained enrollment and
engagement in the school.
• Offer predictable, by-right pathways to families at locations close to their homes.

Proposals for Access to Early Childhood Education
8. Children residing in zones with Title I DCPS schools shall have access by right via the My School DC
system to PK3 and PK4 seats in their zoned DCPS school.
9. Non-Title I DCPS schools shall provide access by lottery to their PK3 and PK4 seats based on program
availability and capacity and applicable lottery preferences.

Access to Transportation
Travel to school can be a barrier for families seeking access to good quality schools because of cost,
time, and problems with safe passage.
The proposals for access to transportation seek to:
• Improve public transit services and affordability for public school families.
• Improve the safety of students traveling to and from school.

Proposals for Access to Transportation
10. DME should work with Metro, Metropolitan and Metro Police, DC Department of Transportation, and
public school parents and students to review bus routes and other Safe Routes to School services and
develop a plan to align routes and services to public school attendance patterns for DCPS and public
charter school students.
11. When an elementary student does not reside within one-mile walking distance of his or her zoned school,
then the District of Columbia shall provide free Metrobus for a parent or guardian to accompany the child
to school.
12. When an elementary student does not reside within one-mile walking distance of his or her zoned school,
then the student shall receive proximity priority in the My School DC lottery to the closest DCPS school.
13. The District shall provide free Metrorail to 9th through 12th grade students for travel to and from a public
school.

Advisory Committee on Student Assignment DRAFT Proposal

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A Complementary System of School Choices
DCPS Out of Boundary Policy
The District of Columbia currently provides families with access to DCPS through an attendance zone,
feeder pathway, or via lottery. Currently, however, the highest performing DCPS schools often have
few seats available via lottery for entry level grades. Parents expressed strong desire for high quality
neighborhood schools, but they also wanted some access to schools other than their zoned schools.
The proposals for the out-of-boundary lottery seek to:
• Give families access to schools that may better fit their children or that may be more convenient for
those families.
• Increase and preserve socioeconomic diversity in DCPS neighborhood zoned schools.
• Provide “at-risk” students better access to high demand, DCPS zoned schools.

Proposals on DCPS Out of Boundary Policies
14. Starting in 2015-16 DCPS shall set aside at least 10 percent of seats in zoned elementary schools for outof-zone students.
15. Starting in 2015-16 DCPS schools that have 30 percent or less of their school enrollment designated as
“at-risk,” under the Uniform Per Student Funding Formula (UPSFF), shall give priority to “at-risk” students
through the common lottery process.
16. DCPS shall set aside at least 10 percent of the 6th grade seats in zoned middle schools for out-of zone
students who do not have feeder rights. Phase in implementation beginning with SY2018-19.
17. DCPS shall set aside at least 10 percent of the new 9th grade seats (excluding enrollment for 9th grade
repeaters) in a zoned high school for out-of-zone students who do not have a feeder right. Phase in
implementation beginning with SY2018-19.
18. Starting with the SY2015-16 lottery, PK3/4 DCPS lottery priorities, in order, shall be:




In-boundary with sibling
In-boundary
Out-of-boundary with sibling
Out-of-boundary at-risk (at qualifying schools for qualifying students)**
Out-of-boundary with proximity (for qualifying students)**

(** denotes new policies)
19. Starting with the SY2015-16 lottery, K-12 DCPS lottery priorities, in order, shall be:
• Out-of-boundary with sibling
• Out-of-boundary at-risk (at qualifying schools for qualifying students)**
• Out-of-boundary with proximity (for qualifying students)**

(** denotes new policies)

DCPS Specialized and Selective School Policies
Public input on specialized schools and selective programs strongly favored having such programs
within DCPS neighborhood-zoned elementary, middle, and high schools. Currently, DCPS operates six
selective admission high schools, two citywide lottery specialized elementary schools, and a growing
number of specialized schools and programs.
The proposals for specialized and selective schools seek to:
• Ensure locations of specialized programs make sense given neighborhood demand for schools of
right.
• Provide families whose zoned school is a specialized program with access to alternative programs
that may better fit their children.

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Advisory Committee on Student Assignment DRAFT Proposal

Proposals for Specialized and Selective Schools
20. Adopt the following definition of a specialized school or program: a school or program within a school
whose curriculum or instructional methods vary from the DCPS standard grade level schools, such that
separate teacher training and instructional materials are required across all grades and all classes offering
that program (e.g., dual language, Montessori, Reggio Emilia).
21. Specialized (non-selective) schools shall be neighborhood schools with boundaries unless there is ample
capacity at adjacent DCPS neighborhood schools to serve the same grades.
22. If DCPS needs capacity for in-zone students in a particular boundary, then the DCPS citywide schools —
lottery or selective schools — located in that boundary may be required to:
• Relocate to provide capacity for students in that neighborhood, or
• Convert to a neighborhood school and offer a non-specialized strand alongside the specialized
program, or
• Convert to a neighborhood school and pair with a non-specialized school to offer the traditional grade
level program, or
• Provide neighborhood priority in the citywide lottery.
23. Students residing within the zone of a whole school dual-language elementary school shall have the right
to attend a non-dual-language school designated as the alternative to the zoned specialized school.
24. DCPS shall ensure that students who are not residents of the District of Columbia are not placed in a
specialized, selective, or charter school or program over DC residents.

Student Continuation and Transfer Policies
The amount of movement among and between public schools is a challenge for students and schools.
Students who repeatedly change schools have statistically worse outcomes, including significantly lower
graduation rates. Furthermore, the impact of that enrollment churn on school culture and resources
negatively affects other students. Current student assignment and choice policies do not account for the
negative impact of student mobility and do not offer disincentives to limit this mobility.
The proposals on student continuation and transfer seek to:
• Incentivize families to minimize movement during the school year.
• Provide opportunities for students with disciplinary issues to stay connected to school programs
tailored to their needs.
• Encourage policies and practices that limit mobility and support educational continuity for students.
• Ensure at-risk students have meaningful access to choice.

Proposals for Student Transfer Policies
25. A student whose place of residence within the District of Columbia changes from one attendance zone
to a different attendance zone shall be permitted to stay in his or her current school until the end of the
school year, and students who are defined as at-risk under the UPSFF shall be permitted to attend the
school until the final grade level.
26. The city should work with relevant stakeholders (including DCPS, PCSB, charter Local Educational
Agencies (LEAs), and community and student representatives) to:
• Develop policy and program recommendations to address the underlying causes of high transfer rates;
• Address conditions for expulsion, suspension, and mid-year involuntary transfer of students; and
• Explore the potential for developing the DCPS CHOICE program into a cross-sector program for DCPS
and public charter schools for mid-year expulsions and long-term suspensions.

Advisory Committee on Student Assignment DRAFT Proposal

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Phasing in Student Assignment Changes
The first year any boundary or feeder changes will go into effect is the 2015-16 school year. However,
the boundary and feeder changes are phased in for families and for schools to ensure adequate
transition times for families and for DCPS schools.

Proposals for Phasing Policy, Boundary, and Feeder Changes
A. Starting in 2015-16, students and their siblings who have been enrolled in their in-boundary
school, but have been re-zoned to another school, shall maintain in-boundary rights, at their
current in-boundary school until they complete that school.
B. Starting in 2015-16, students who have been re-zoned to another school may attend their newly
zoned school, by right.
C. Starting in 2015-16 all NEW students, shall be assigned to the newly zoned school. NEW students
are defined as:
• Students moving into an area that has been assigned to a different school.
• Charter school students or out-of-boundary DCPS students who wish to return to their DCPS
neighborhood school from their charter school or out-of-boundary DCPS school.
• Students who are attending a school for the first time (e.g., at the entry grade) who live in an area
that has been re-zoned and who do not have siblings currently attending the former assigned
school.
D. Starting in 2015-16 PK3 and PK4 students can enroll by right in their DCPS zoned elementary or
PS-8th grade school, provided it is Title I but must register at the school by the My School DC
deadline to enable DCPS to plan for staffing, materials, and space. Students seeking to enroll after
the My School DC deadline will be placed in PK3 and PK4 on a space available basis.
E. Students who are enrolled in the 3rd through 5th grade for the 2014-15 school year at an
elementary school whose feeder pathway changes shall have the right to continue to their former
destination school OR to the newly designated feeder pattern beginning in the 2015-16 school
year.
F. Students who are in PK3 through 2nd grade as of the 2014-15 school year shall feed into the
newly designated feeder school, unless they have a sibling attending the former middle school at
the time of transition.
G. Students enrolled in the 6th through 8th grades for the 2014-15 school year at a school whose
high school feeder pathway changes shall have the right to continue in their former feeder pathway
OR the newly designated pathway beginning in the 2015-16 school year.
H. Students whose new feeder pathway relies on the opening of a new school shall retain their
current feeder pathway and geographic rights until the new school is open.
I.

Starting in 2018-19 the proposed 10 percent out-of-boundary set asides for 6th graders in middle
schools shall be provided by DCPS and be available through the common lottery to rising 6th
graders not already in that middle school’s feeder pattern.

J. Starting in 2018-19 the proposed 10percent out-of-boundary set asides for 9th graders in high
schools shall be provided by DCPS and be available through the common lottery to rising 9th
graders not already in that high school’s feeder pattern.

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Advisory Committee on Student Assignment DRAFT Proposal

A Coherent System of High Quality Public Schools
Better Planning Within and Across Public School Sectors
A consistent theme throughout this process – both in public meetings and Advisory Committee meetings
– has been the need to consider the role of charter schools in citywide planning efforts around student
assignment. There was widespread recognition that devising student assignment policies for DCPS
without taking into account the environment created by DC’s charter sector would lead to policies that
do not realistically address the need to foster predictability and access to high quality schools close to
home for families across the District.
Concern about accountability and growth in the charter sector was widely shared by community working
group participants, many of whom expressed a preference for a citywide cap on charter enrollment. At
the same time, participants did not want to undermine the basic educational autonomy of individual
public charter LEAs.
Moreover, concern about planning was not just about the lack of coordination between sectors, but
was also about the lack of internal DCPS planning capacity for decision making on school boundaries,
school closings, and capital planning for DCPS school facilities.
The proposals to improve the District’s planning within and across public school sectors seek to:
• Create conditions for a more sustainable and equitable allocation of city resources and opportunities
for families.
• Promote an informed, transparent, and publicly vetted process for identifying challenges and possible
solutions for school supply/demand issues, determining school sites, and student assignment
policies.

Proposals for Educational Facilities Planning
27. In 2022, and every ten years thereafter, the city shall undergo a comprehensive review of student
assignment policies, including school boundaries and feeder patterns.
28. The Chancellor shall ensure parity in specialized and selective programs within each DCPS high school
feeder pathway.
29. The Chancellor shall ensure that specialized and selective programs are developed and supported in
every one of the comprehensive high schools as part of their educational plans.
30. The city and relevant stakeholders should address key issues related to information sharing and
coordination between the two public school sectors such as:




Public school openings and expansion, closings, relocation, co-location.
Capital program investment.
Alignment of grade configurations.
Distribution of “at-risk” students in public charter schools.
High rates of student transfers between schools during the course of the school year.

31. The city should revise DC Municipal Regulations (DCMR) to ensure that the same public notice and
engagement requirements for boundary changes are required for changes in feeder patterns.

Ensuring Adequate DCPS Capacity in Support of by Right Schools
Child population decline or growth falls most heavily on DCPS as the municipal system of right. All
compulsory education students, no matter their location, needs, or when they arrive in the school year,
must be served by DCPS. In order to meet this obligation, the District needs to develop a plan that
responds to current and projected population needs and aligns with the DCPS capital plan. With current
and projected growth in child population, it is particularly important that DCPS be prepared to respond
to increased demand for schools of right.

Advisory Committee on Student Assignment DRAFT Proposal

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The proposals for school building capacity seek to:
• Ensure that DCPS is planning now for current and future programmatic and space needs of District
families.
• Establish triggers for neighborhood specific planning to address issues of crowding or under
utilization at the individual school and community levels.

Proposals to Ensure Adequate DCPS Capacity
32. DCPS shall develop a program and facilities plan and budget to increase early childhood capacity in
Title I schools to serve DCPS zoned families in support of expanded rights to PK3 and PK4.
33. DCPS should open a stand-alone Center City middle school to replace the middle grades program at
Cardozo HS, in order to:
• Improve middle grade academics and programming for families in Wards 1 and 2;
• Increase capacity of Cardozo HS for 9th -12th grade programming; and
• Build a strong middle grades cohort to feed into Cardozo from the elementary feeders.
34. Open a Ward 4 South middle school at the MacFarland site no sooner than 2015-16 and phase out
middle grades programming at the surrounding education campuses in order to:



Improve middle grade academics and programming;
Relieve current and projected crowding at nearby elementary schools;
Support the expansion of early childhood access in neighborhood schools; and
Provide a dual language middle school feeder pathway.

35. Identify a site for a Ward 4 North middle school no later than Summer 2015 and plan to open a Ward 4
North middle school and phase out middle grades programming at the surrounding education campuses
in conjunction with the modernization of Coolidge HS, (2017-18) in order to:
• Improve middle grade academics and programming;
• Relieve current and projected crowding, particularly at Brightwood and La Salle; and
• Support the expansion of early childhood access in neighborhood schools.
36. Open a Ward 7 middle school with specialized and selective programming at the Ron Brown site, no
sooner than 2015-16 in order to:



Improve middle grade academics and programming east of the river;
More equitably distribute selective programs in the city;
Relieve crowding at Kelly Miller; and
Increase investment in the Woodson feeder pathway to ensure a well prepared student cohort that will
matriculate to Woodson.

37. DCPS should prioritize a study to open a new school or expand the capacity of a zoned school if:
• The capacity of the zoned elementary school is equal to or less than 45 percent of the ageappropriate public school population within the attendance zone, and
• The in-boundary percentage of enrollment is greater than or equal to 75 percent, and
• The utilization rate of the zoned elementary school is 90 percent or greater; OR
• The school community is geographically isolated, such that travel to school for elementary age
children is unsafe.

Based on the above criteria, the Advisory Committee has identified several schools to consider for reopening.
• Within the proposed Hendley boundary, there is only capacity at Hendley to serve 32 percent of the
elementary age children living in the boundary. The school is already at 101 percent capacity with 91
percent of its enrollment in-boundary. The Advisory Committee recommends that DCPS consider reopening Ferebee-Hope to adequately serve the community living within the Hendley boundary.

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Advisory Committee on Student Assignment DRAFT Proposal

• The Kenilworth community is isolated. Student travel to the newly assigned Thomas (Ward 7) school
is not walkable and Thomas ES is over-crowded and 104 percent utilized. The Advisory Committee
recommends that DCPS consider re-opening Kenilworth (Ward 7).
• Marshall ES (Ward 5) was closed due to low enrollment, but it is in an isolated community that is
growing. The Advisory Committee does not recommend re-opening Marshall at this time, but does
recommend closely monitoring the child population growth of the community.
38. DCPS should prioritize a study to add capacity to or shrink boundaries of a zoned school if:

• The DCPS school has been utilized at 90 percent or more and has had an in-boundary
percentage of the enrollment greater than 75 percent for three years.
• DCPS must work with the school and community to evaluate the school-specific boundary
population, feeder school enrollments, in-boundary participation rates, adjacent charter
enrollments, and population projections to identify whether any action on boundaries, feeder
pathways, building expansion, grade configuration, or other changes may be required.
The elementary and PS-8 schools that meet these criteria in the 2013-14 school year are:
Hendley ES (Ward 8)

Plummer ES (Ward 7

Janney ES (Ward 3)

Savoy ES (Ward 8)

Truesdell EC (Ward 4)

Murch ES (Ward 3)

Patterson ES (Ward 8)

Lafayette ES (Ward 4)

Stoddert ES (Ward 3)

Stanton ES (Ward 8)

Key ES (Ward 3)

The Advisory Committee has tried to address the challenges facing these schools through a combination
of grade configuration changes, boundary changes, and adding building capacity.
39. DCPS should prioritize an under-utilization study if:
• A DCPS school has been utilized at 60 percent or less for three years consecutively.
• DCPS must work with the local school and community to evaluate the school specific boundary
population, in-boundary participations rates, charter enrollments in the vicinity, five- to ten-year
population projections for the boundary and its adjacent boundaries, as well as identify any school
quality barriers that may be affecting school utilization. DCPS must then identify whether any action
on boundaries, co-locations, consolidations, grade configuration changes, or educational interventions
are required to address the low utilization.

The elementary and PS-8 schools that meet these criteria in the 2013-14 school year are:
Aiton ES (Ward 7)

Browne EC (Ward 5)

Langley EC (Ward 5)

Malcolm X (Ward 8)

Brookland @ Bunker Hill (Ward 5)

Drew ES (Ward 7)

The Advisory Committee tried to address these conditions by increasing the boundaries for these
schools, and recommending the expansion of early childhood seats in order to make connections to
families and children early, with the expectation that more families will continue in their neighborhood
elementary school once relationships are established in the early childhood years.

Advisory Committee on Student Assignment DRAFT Proposal

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Proposed Middle School Attendance Zones and Geographic Feeder

Proposed Middle School Attendance Zones and Geographic Feeder Elementary Schools
Elementary Schools
6/12/14

Shepherd

Takoma
Lafayette
Brightwood

New North
Whittier

Deal
Lasalle-Backus

Truesdell

Murch

West

Janney

Barnard

MacFarland
Hearst

Brookland @ Bunker Hill

Powell

Mann
Raymond Bruce Monroe @ Park View
Eaton

Bancroft

Burroughs

Brookland

Tubman

Columbia Heights

Key

Hardy

Stoddert

Oyster-Adams

Noyes

Cooke, H.D

Oyster-Adams
Reed, Marie
Garrison

Langley

Ross New Center City

McKinley

Seaton

Hyde-Addison

Langdon

Cleveland

School Without Walls @ Francis-Stevens

School Without Walls @ Francis-Stevens
Thomson

Wheatley
Walker-Jones

Walker-Jones

Browne

Browne

Thomas

Houston

Wilson, J.O.

Kelly Miller

Stuart-Hobson
Ludlow-Taylor
Maury

Smothers

Eliot-Hine
Payne

Brent

Burrville
Aiton

Miner

Drew

Nalle Harris, C. W

Watkins

Kimball

Plummer

Tyler
Amidon-Bowen

Sousa

Jefferson
Van Ness
Orr

Randle Highlands

Ketcham

Kramer

Savoy

Moten

Turner

Beers

Stanton

Garfield

Johnson
King, Martin Luther Malcolm X

Simon
Leckie

Hart
Hendley

Patterson

Note: The elementary attendance zones are based on the June 12
proposal. The elementary schools proposed to feed to the
designated middle school are the same color. For instance,
Amidon-Bowen ES, Brent ES, Tyler ES, and Van Ness ES are
proposed to feed to Jefferson MS and they are uniformly shaded a
tan color.

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Advisory Committee on Student Assignment DRAFT Proposal

Proposed High School Attendance Zones and Geographic Feeder
Proposed High School Attendance Zones and Geographic Feeder Middle Schools
Middle Schools
6/12/14

Coolidge

New North

Deal

MacFarland

Roosevelt

Wilson

Brookland
Columbia Heights
Hardy

Dunbar

Oyster-Adams

New Center City

McKinley
Browne

Cardozo
School Without Walls
@ Francis-Stevens

Kelly Miller

Woodson

Walker-Jones
Stuart-Hobson
Eliot-Hine

Eastern
Sousa

Jefferson

Anacostia
Kramer

Johnson

Ballou
Hart

Note: The middle school attendance zones are based on the June
12 proposal. The middle schools proposed to feed to the high
school are the same color. For instance, Sousa MS and Kramer MS
are proposed to feed to Anacostia HS and they are uniformly shaded a
dark pink color.

Advisory Committee on Student Assignment DRAFT Proposal

13

Proposed Geographic Feeder Pathways
Feeder pathways are established to provide geographic, program and academic continuity and access.
It is also a system through which DCPS can affect the crowding or underutilization of its secondary
schools.

ANACOSTIA HIGH SCHOOL (Ward 8)
Ketcham ES
Moten ES
Orr ES
Randle Highlands ES

Kramer MS

Savoy ES
Stanton ES

Anacostia HS

Beers ES
C.W. Harris
JC Nalle ES

Sousa MS

Kimball ES
Plummer ES

BALLOU HIGH SCHOOL (Ward 8)
Hendley ES
King ES
Leckie ES

Hart MS

Patterson ES

Ballou HS

Simon ES
Garfield ES
Malcolm X ES

Johnson MS

Turner ES

CARDOZO HIGH SCHOOL (Ward 1)
H.D. Cooke ES
Tubman ES

Columbia Heights EC (6-8)

Cleveland ES
Garrison ES
Marie Reed ES
Ross ES

New Center City MS

Seaton ES
Thomson ES
SWW at Francis-Stevens EC

14

Advisory Committee on Student Assignment DRAFT Proposal

Cardozo HS

COOLIDGE HIGH SCHOOL (Ward 4)
Brightwood ES (Proposes
Conversion to Elementary)
La Salle-Backus ES (Proposes
Conversion to Elementary)
Takoma ES (Proposes
Conversion to Elementary)

NEW North MS

Coolidge HS

Whittier ES (Proposes
Conversion to Elementary)

DUNBAR HIGH SCHOOL (Ward 5)
Brookland at Bunker Hill
ES (Plan for Conversion to
Elementary)
Burroughs ES (Plan for
Conversion to Elementary)

Brookland MS

Langdon (Plan for Conversion to
Elementary)

Dunbar HS

Noyes ES (Plan for Conversion
to Elementary)
Langley ES
Wheatley ES (Proposes
Conversion to Elementary)

McKinley Tech. Ed. Campus
(6-8)

Walker-Jones EC

EASTERN HIGH SCHOOL (Ward 6)
Browne PS-8
Capitol Hill Montessori @Logan PS-8 (citywide school with no
boundary)
Maury ES
Miner ES
Payne ES

Eliot-Hine MS

School-within-School (citywide
school with no boundary)

Eastern HS

Amidon-Bowen ES
Brent ES
Tyler ES

Jefferson Acad. MS

Van Ness ES
J.O. Wilson ES
Ludlow-Taylor ES

Stuart-Hobson MS

Peabody/Watkins ES

Advisory Committee on Student Assignment DRAFT Proposal

15

ROOSEVELT HIGH SCHOOL (Ward 4)
Barnard ES
Bruce-Monroe ES
Powell ES
Raymond ES (Proposes
Conversion to Elementary)

MacFarland MS

Roosevelt HS

Truesdell ES (Proposes
Conversion to Elementary)
West ES (Proposes Conversion
to Elementary)

WILSON HIGH SCHOOL (Ward 3)
Bancroft ES
Hearst ES
Janney ES
Lafayette ES

Deal MS

Murch ES
Shepherd ES

Wilson HS

Eaton ES
Hyde/Addison ES
Key ES

Hardy MS

Mann ES
Stoddert ES
Oyster-Adams EC

WOODSON HIGH SCHOOL (Ward 7)
Aiton ES
Burrville ES
Drew ES
Houston ES

Kelly Miller MS
Woodson HS

Smothers ES
Thomas ES
Ron Brown Selective/
Specialized MS

16

Advisory Committee on Student Assignment DRAFT Proposal

Proposed Programmatic Feeder Pathways
Dual-Language Programs
N/A

CHEC MS

Oyster-Adams Bilingual EC
Bancroft ES
Bruce-Monroe ES
Cleveland ES DL Program
Marie Reed ES DL Program

Roosevelt DL Program
MacFarland DL Program

Powell ES DL Program
Tyler DL Program

STEM Programs
N/A

McKinley MS

Woodson HS

Advisory Committee on Student Assignment DRAFT Proposal

17

Advisory Committee Members
Abigail Smith, Deputy Mayor for Education, Chairperson

Community Representatives
Maryam Ahranjani, Ward 1, Parent
Marshall Brennan Constitutional Literacy
Project, American University

Emily Bloomfield, Ward 2, Resident
Former Member, D.C. Public Charter School
Board; Charter Operator

Wilma Bonner, Ward 4, Resident
Howard University

Ed Davies, Ward 4, Resident
Children Youth Investment Trust Corporation

Denise Forte, Ward 6, DCPS Parent

Matthew Frumin, Ward 3, DCPS Parent
ANC- 3E Commissioner

Heather Harding, Ward 5, PCS Parent
The Ed Consortium for Research and
Evaluation (EdCORE)

Faith Hubbard, Ward 5, Resident, Parent
Ward Five Council on Education; D.C. Board
of Library Trustees

Rev. Donald Isaac, Ward 7, Resident
East of the River Clergy, Police,
Community Partnership; Interfaith Council

Kamili Kiros, Ward 8, PCS Parent
Achievement Prep Board of Trustees

Cathy Reilly, Ward 4 Resident
Senior High Alliance of Parents Principals
and Educators (SHAPPE); Ward 4
Education Alliance

Sharona Robinson, Ward 8, DCPS parent
Ward 8 Education Council; Ballou High School
PTSA

Evelyn Boyd Simmons, Ward 2, DCPS Parent
ANC-2F Education Committee Co-Chair
Ward 2 Ed Network

Eboni-Rose Thompson, Ward 7, Resident
Save the Children US; Ward 7 Education
Council; LSAT for Plummer Elementary School

Marta Urquilla, Ward 4, PCS Parent

Martin Welles, Ward 6, DCPS Parent
Federal labor and employment attorney;
Amidon-Bowen Elementary School PTA

District Agency Representatives

18

Josephine Bias-Robinson, Chief of Family &
Public Engagement, D.C. Public Schools

Clara Hess, Director, Human Capital and Strategic
Initiatives, D.C. Public Charter School Board

Christopher Delfs, Citywide Planner, D.C.
Office of Planning

Ellen McCarthy, Acting Director, D.C. Office of
Planning

Ariana Quiñones, Chief of Staff, Office of the
Deputy Mayor for Health and Human Services

Iris Bond Gill, Grants Management & Compliance,
D.C. Office of the State Superintendent of
Education

Advisory Committee on Student Assignment DRAFT Proposal



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Tell us what you think!
Complete a feedback form by July 21st at dme.dc.gov/boundaries
Email your concerns and questions to
dme.studentassignment@dc.gov or call 202-478-5738

Advisory Committee on Student Assignment DRAFT Proposal
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