Cite as:   576 U. S. ____ (2015) 
 
   
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 

SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES
_________________ 

Nos. 14–556, 14-562, 14-571 and 14–574  
_________________ 

JAMES OBERGEFELL, ET AL
  ., PETITIONERS 
14–556 
v. 
RICHARD HODGES, DIRECTOR, OHIO  
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, ET AL
  .; 
 
14–562 

VALERIA TANCO, ET AL
  ., PETITIONERS 
v. 
BILL HASLAM, GOVERNOR OF   
TENNESSEE, ET AL
  .;  

 
APRIL DEBOER, ET AL
  ., PETITIONERS 
14–571 
v. 
RICK SNYDER, GOVERNOR OF MICHIGAN,  
ET AL
  .; AND 
 
GREGORY BOURKE, ET AL
  ., PETITIONERS 
14–574 
v. 
STEVE BESHEAR, GOVERNOR OF  
KENTUCKY  
ON WRITS OF CERTIORARI TO THE UNITED STATES COURT OF 
APPEALS FOR THE SIXTH CIRCUIT  
[June 26, 2015]

 CHIEF  JUSTICE  ROBERTS,  with  whom  JUSTICE  SCALIA  
and JUSTICE  THOMAS join, dissenting. 
  Petitioners  make  strong  arguments  rooted  in  social 
policy  and  considerations  of  fairness.    They  contend  that 
same-sex  couples  should  be  allowed  to  affirm  their  love 
and  commitment  through  marriage,  just  like  opposite-sex 
couples.  That  position  has  undeniable  appeal;  over  the 


 

OBERGEFELL v. HODGES  
 
   
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 

past six years, voters and legislators in eleven States and 
the  District  of  Columbia  have  revised  their  laws  to  allow 
 
 
marriage between two people of the same sex.
  But  this  Court  is  not  a  legislature.    Whether  same-sex 
marriage  is  a  good  idea  should  be  of  no  concern  to  us.  
Under  the  Constitution,  judges  have  power  to  say  what 
the law is, not what it should be.  The people who ratified 
the  Constitution  authorized  courts  to  exercise  “neither  
force  nor  will  but  merely  judgment.”    The  Federalist  No. 
78, p. 465 (C. Rossiter ed. 1961) (A. Hamilton) (capitalization altered).
  Although  the  policy  arguments  for  extending  marriage 
to  same-sex  couples  may  be  compelling,  the  legal  arguments  for  requiring  such  an  extension  are  not.    The  fundamental right to marry does not include a right to make 
a  State  change  its  definition  of  marriage.    And  a  State’s  
decision  to  maintain  the  meaning  of  marriage  that  has 
persisted  in  every  culture  throughout  human  history  can 
hardly be called irrational.  In short, our Constitution does 
not  enact  any  one  theory  of  marriage.    The  people  of   a 
State  are  free  to  expand  marriage  to  include  same-sex 
couples, or to retain the historic definition.
  Today, however, the Court takes the extraordinary step 
of  ordering  every  State  to  license  and  recognize  same-sex 
marriage.  Many people will rejoice at this decision, and I 
begrudge none their celebration.  But for those who believe 
in  a  government  of  laws,  not  of  men,  the  majority’s  approach  is  deeply  disheartening.    Supporters  of  same-sex 
marriage  have  achieved  considerable  success  persuading 
their  fellow  citizens—through  the  democratic  process—to 
adopt  their  view.  That  ends  today.  Five  lawyers  have 
closed the debate and enacted their own vision of marriage 
as a matter of constitutional law.  Stealing this issue from 
the  people  will  for  many  cast  a  cloud  over  same-sex  marriage,  making  a  dramatic  social  change  that  much  more 
difficult to accept.  

 

Cite as:   576 U. S. ____ (2015) 
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 
   
 

  The  majority’s  decision  is  an  act  of  will,  not  legal  judgment.  The right it announces has no basis in the Constitution  or  this  Court’s  precedent.  The  majority  expressly 
disclaims  judicial  “caution”  and  omits  even  a  pretense  of 
humility,  openly  relying  on  its  desire  to  remake  society 
according  to  its  own  “new  insight”  into  the  “nature  of 
injustice.”  Ante,  at  11,  23.    As  a  result,  the  Court  invalidates the marriage laws of more than half the States and 
orders  the  transformation  of  a  social  institution  that  has  
formed  the  basis  of  human  society  for  millennia,  for  the 
Kalahari  Bushmen  and  the  Han  Chinese,  the  Carthagin- 
ians and the Aztecs.  Just who do we think we are? 
  It can be tempting for judges to confuse our own preferences with the requirements of the law.  But as this Court  
has  been  reminded  throughout  our  history,  the  Constitution “is made for people of fundamentally differing views.”  
Lochner v. New York, 198 U. S. 45, 76 (1905) (Holmes, J.,  
dissenting).  Accordingly,  “courts  are  not  concerned  with 
the wisdom or policy of legislation.”  Id., at 69 (Harlan, J.,
dissenting).  The  majority  today  neglects  that  restrained 
conception  of  the  judicial  role.    It  seizes  for  itself  a  question the Constitution leaves to the people, at a time when 
the  people  are  engaged  in  a  vibrant  debate  on  that  question.  And  it  answers  that  question  based  not  on  neutral 
principles  of  constitutional  law,  but  on  its  own  “understanding  of  what  freedom  is  and  must  become.”    Ante,  at  
19.  I have no choice but to dissent. 
  Understand  well  what  this  dissent  is  about:  It  is  not 
about  whether,  in  my  judgment,  the  institution  of  marriage should be changed to include same-sex couples.  It is 
instead  about  whether,  in  our  democratic  republic,  that 
decision  should  rest  with  the  people  acting  through  their 
elected  representatives,  or  with  five  lawyers  who  happen 
to  hold  commissions  authorizing  them  to  resolve  legal 
disputes  according  to  law.  The  Constitution  leaves  no 
doubt about the answer. 


 

OBERGEFELL v. HODGES  
 
   
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting


  Petitioners and their amici base their arguments on the 
“right to marry” and the imperative of “marriage equality.”  
There is no serious dispute that, under our precedents, the 
Constitution protects a right to marry and requires States 
to apply their marriage laws equally.  The real question in 
these  cases  is  what  constitutes  “marriage,”  or—more 
precisely—who decides what constitutes “marriage”? 
  The majority largely ignores these questions, relegating 
ages of human experience with marriage to a paragraph or  
two.  Even  if  history  and  precedent  are  not  “the  end”  of 
these cases, ante, at 4, I would not “sweep away what has 
so  long  been  settled”  without  showing  greater  respect  for 
all  that  preceded  us.    Town of Greece  v.   Galloway,  572  
U. S. ___, ___ (2014) (slip op., at 8). 

  As the majority acknowledges, marriage “has existed for 
millennia  and  across  civilizations.”     Ante,  at  3.  For  all 
those  millennia,  across  all  those  civilizations,  “marriage” 
referred to only one relationship: the union of a man and a 
woman.  See  ante,  at  4;  Tr.  of  Oral  Arg.  on  Question  1, 
p. 12 (petitioners conceding that they are not aware of any 
society that permitted same-sex marriage before 2001).  As 
the  Court  explained  two  Terms  ago,  “until  recent  years, 
. . .  marriage  between  a  man  and  a  woman  no  doubt  had 
been  thought  of  by  most  people  as  essential  to  the  very 
definition  of  that  term  and  to  its  role  and  function 
throughout  the  history  of  civilization.”    United States  v.  
Windsor, 570 U. S. ___, ___ (2013) (slip op., at 13). 
  This  universal  definition  of  marriage  as  the  union  of  a 
man  and  a  woman  is  no  historical  coincidence.    Marriage
did  not  come  about  as  a  result  of  a  political  movement, 
discovery,  disease,  war,  religious  doctrine,  or  any  other 
moving  force  of  world  history—and  certainly  not  as  a 
result  of  a  prehistoric  decision  to  exclude  gays  and  lesbi-

 

Cite as:   576 U. S. ____ (2015) 
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 
   
 

ans.  It arose in the nature of things to meet a vital need: 
ensuring  that  children  are  conceived  by  a  mother  and 
father  committed  to  raising  them  in  the  stable  conditions 
of  a  lifelong  relationship.    See  G.  Quale,  A  History  of 
Marriage  Systems  2  (1988);  cf.  M.  Cicero,  De  Officiis  57 
(W.  Miller  transl.  1913)  (“For  since  the  reproductive  instinct  is  by  nature’s  gift  the  common  possession  of  all 
living  creatures,  the  first  bond  of  union  is  that  between 
husband  and  wife;  the  next,  that  between  parents  and 
children;  then  we  find  one  home,  with  everything  in 
common.”).
  The premises supporting this concept of marriage are so 
fundamental  that  they  rarely  require  articulation.    The 
human race must procreate to survive.  Procreation occurs  
through  sexual  relations  between  a  man  and  a  woman.  
When  sexual  relations  result  in  the  conception  of  a  child, 
that  child’s  prospects  are  generally  better  if  the  mother 
and father stay together rather than going their separate  
ways.  Therefore,  for  the  good  of  children  and  society, 
sexual relations that can lead to procreation should occur
only between a man and a woman committed to a lasting 
bond. 
  Society  has  recognized  that  bond  as  marriage.    And  by 
bestowing  a  respected  status  and  material  benefits  on 
married  couples,  society  encourages  men  and  women  to 
conduct  sexual  relations  within  marriage  rather  than 
without.  As  one  prominent  scholar  put  it,  “Marriage  is  a 
socially arranged solution for the problem of getting people 
to stay together and care for children that the mere desire 
for  children,  and  the  sex  that  makes  children  possible,
does  not  solve.”    J.  Q.  Wilson,  The  Marriage  Problem  41 
(2002).
  This  singular  understanding  of  marriage  has  prevailed 
in the United States throughout our history.  The majority
accepts  that  at  “the  time  of  the  Nation’s  founding  [marriage] was understood to be a voluntary contract between 


 

OBERGEFELL v. HODGES  
 
   
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 

a man and a woman.”    Ante, at 6.  Early Americans drew 
heavily  on  legal  scholars  like  William  Blackstone,  who 
regarded  marriage  between  “husband  and  wife”  as  one  of 
the  “great  relations  in  private  life,”  and  philosophers  like 
John Locke, who described marriage as “a voluntary compact between man and woman” centered on “its chief end, 
procreation”  and  the  “nourishment  and  support”  of  children.  1  W.  Blackstone,  Commentaries  *410;  J.  Locke,  
Second  Treatise  of  Civil  Government  §§78–79,  p.  39  (J. 
Gough  ed.  1947).  To  those  who  drafted  and  ratified  the 
Constitution, this conception of marriage and family “was 
a  given:  its  structure,  its  stability,  roles,  and  values  accepted by all.”  Forte, The Framers’ Idea of Marriage and 
Family,  in  The  Meaning  of  Marriage  100,  102  (R.  George 
& J. Elshtain eds. 2006). 
  The  Constitution  itself  says  nothing  about  marriage, 
and the Framers thereby entrusted the States with “[t]he 
whole  subject  of  the  domestic  relations  of  husband  and 
wife.”  Windsor, 570 U. S., at ___ (slip op., at 17) (quoting  
In re Burrus, 136 U. S. 586, 593–594 (1890)).  There is no  
dispute that every State at the founding—and every State 
throughout  our  history  until  a  dozen  years  ago—defined
marriage  in  the  traditional,  biologically  rooted  way.    The 
four  States  in  these  cases  are  typical.    Their  laws,  before 
and after statehood, have treated marriage as the union of 
a man and a woman.  See DeBoer v. Snyder, 772 F. 3d 388,  
396–399 (CA6 2014).  Even when state laws did not spec- 
ify  this  definition  expressly,  no  one  doubted  what  they 
meant.  See Jones v. Hallahan, 501 S. W. 2d 588, 589 (Ky. 
 
App.  1973).    The  meaning  of  “marriage”  went  without 
saying.
  Of  course,  many  did  say  it.  In  his  first  American  dictionary,  Noah  Webster  defined  marriage  as  “the  legal 
union  of  a  man  and  woman  for  life,”  which  served  the 
purposes of “preventing the promiscuous intercourse of the 
sexes, . . . promoting domestic felicity, and . . . securing the 

 

Cite as:   576 U. S. ____ (2015) 
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 
   
 

maintenance  and  education  of  children.”  1  An  American 
Dictionary of the English Language (1828).  An influential 
19th-century  treatise  defined  marriage  as  “a  civil  status, 
existing in one man and one woman legally united for life 
for those civil and social purposes which are  based in the 
distinction of sex.”  J. Bishop, Commentaries on the Law of
Marriage  and  Divorce  25  (1852).    The  first  edition  of 
Black’s  Law  Dictionary  defined  marriage  as  “the  civil 
status  of  one  man  and one  woman  united  in  law  for  life.”  
Black’s  Law  Dictionary  756  (1891)  (emphasis  deleted).  
The dictionary maintained essentially that same definition 
for the next century. 
  This  Court’s  precedents  have  repeatedly  described 
marriage  in  ways  that  are  consistent  only  with  its  traditional  meaning.  Early  cases  on  the  subject  referred  to 
marriage  as  “the  union  for  life  of  one  man  and  one  woman,”  Murphy  v.  Ramsey,  114  U. S.  15,  45  (1885),  which 
forms “the foundation of the family and of society, without 
which  there  would  be  neither  civilization  nor  progress,” 
Maynard  v.  Hill,  125  U. S.  190,  211  (1888).    We  later 
described marriage as “fundamental to our very existence 
and survival,” an understanding that necessarily implies a 
procreative component.  Loving v. Virginia, 388 U. S. 1, 12  
(1967);  see  Skinner  v.  Oklahoma ex rel. Williamson,  316  
U. S.  535,  541  (1942).    More  recent  cases  have  directly 
connected the right to marry with the “right to procreate.”  
Zablocki v. Redhail, 434 U. S. 374, 386 (1978).
  As  the  majority  notes,  some  aspects  of  marriage  have 
changed  over  time.  Arranged  marriages  have  largely 
given way to pairings based on romantic love.  States have 
replaced  coverture,  the  doctrine  by  which  a  married  man 
and  woman  became  a  single  legal  entity,  with  laws  that 
respect  each  participant’s  separate  status.    Racial  restrictions  on  marriage,  which  “arose  as  an  incident  to  
slavery” to promote “White Supremacy,” were repealed by 
many  States  and  ultimately  struck  down  by  this  Court.   


 

OBERGEFELL v. HODGES  
 
   
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 

Loving, 388 U. S., at 6–7. 
  The  majority  observes  that  these  developments  “were 
not  mere  superficial  changes”  in  marriage,  but  rather 
“worked  deep  transformations  in  its  structure.”    Ante,  at  
6–7.  They  did  not,  however,  work  any  transformation  in 
the core structure of marriage as the union between a man 
and a woman.  If you had asked a person on the street how 
marriage was defined, no one would ever have said, “Marriage is the union of a man and a woman, where the woman 
is  subject  to  coverture.”    The  majority  may  be  right   that 
the  “history  of  marriage  is  one  of  both  continuity  and 
change,”  but  the  core  meaning  of  marriage  has  endured.  
Ante, at 6.  

  Shortly  after  this  Court  struck  down  racial  restrictions 
on marriage in Loving, a gay couple in Minnesota sought a 
marriage  license.  They  argued  that  the  Constitution 
required  States  to  allow  marriage  between  people  of  the 
same  sex  for  the  same  reasons  that  it  requires  States  to 
allow  marriage  between  people   of  different  races.    The 
Minnesota  Supreme  Court  rejected  their  analogy  to  Loving,  and  this  Court  summarily  dismissed  an  appeal.  
Baker v. Nelson, 409 U. S. 810 (1972).
  In the decades after Baker, greater numbers of gays and 
lesbians began living openly, and many expressed a desire 
to have their relationships recognized as marriages.  Over  
time,  more  people  came  to  see  marriage  in  a  way  that 
could  be  extended  to  such  couples.    Until  recently,  this 
new view of marriage remained a minority position.  After  
the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court in 2003 interpreted  its  State  Constitution  to  require  recognition  of 
same-sex  marriage,  many  States—including  the  four  at 
issue  here—enacted  constitutional  amendments  formally 
adopting the longstanding definition of marriage. 
  Over the last few years, public opinion on marriage has 

 

Cite as:   576 U. S. ____ (2015) 
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 
   
 

shifted rapidly.  In 2009, the legislatures of Vermont, New 
Hampshire, and the District of Columbia became the first 
in  the  Nation  to  enact  laws  that  revised  the  definition  of  
marriage to include same-sex couples, while also providing 
accommodations for religious believers.  In 2011, the New 
York Legislature enacted a similar law.  In 2012, voters in 
Maine did the same, reversing the result of a referendum 
just  three  years  earlier  in  which  they  had  upheld  the 
traditional definition of marriage.
  In  all,  voters  and  legislators  in  eleven  States  and  the 
District  of  Columbia  have  changed  their  definitions  of 
marriage to include same-sex couples.  The highest courts 
of  five  States  have  decreed  that  same  result  under  their 
own Constitutions.  The remainder of the States retain the  
traditional definition of marriage.
  Petitioners  brought  lawsuits  contending  that  the  Due 
Process  and  Equal  Protection  Clauses  of  the  Fourteenth 
Amendment  compel  their  States  to  license  and  recognize 
marriages  between  same-sex  couples.  In  a  carefully  reasoned  decision,  the  Court  of  Appeals  acknowledged  the 
democratic  “momentum”  in  favor  of  “expand[ing]  the 
definition  of  marriage  to  include  gay  couples,”  but  concluded that petitioners had not made “the case for constitutionalizing  the  definition  of  marriage  and  for  removing 
the issue from the place it has been since the founding: in 
the  hands  of  state  voters.”  772  F. 3d,  at  396,  403.    That 
decision  interpreted  the  Constitution  correctly,  and  I 
would affirm. 
II  
  Petitioners first contend that the marriage laws of their 
States violate the Due Process Clause.  The Solicitor General of the United States, appearing in support of petitioners,  expressly  disowned  that  position  before  this  Court.  
See Tr. of Oral Arg. on Question 1, at 38–39.  The majority 
nevertheless  resolves  these  cases  for  petitioners  based 

10 
 

OBERGEFELL v. HODGES  
 
   
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 

almost entirely on the Due Process Clause. 
  The  majority  purports  to  identify  four  “principles  and 
traditions”  in  this  Court’s  due  process  precedents  that 
support  a  fundamental  right  for  same-sex  couples  to  
marry.  Ante, at 12.  In reality, however, the majority’s ap- 
proach has no basis in principle or tradition, except for the 
unprincipled  tradition  of  judicial  policymaking  that  characterized  discredited  decisions  such  as  Lochner  v.  New
York,  198  U. S.  45.    Stripped  of  its  shiny  rhetorical  gloss, 
the  majority’s  argument  is  that  the  Due  Process  Clause 
gives  same-sex  couples  a  fundamental  right  to  marry 
because it will be good for them and for society.  If I were a 
legislator, I would certainly consider that view as a matter 
of social policy.  But as a judge, I find the majority’s position indefensible as a matter of constitutional law. 

  Petitioners’  “fundamental  right”  claim  falls  into  the 
most  sensitive  category  of  constitutional  adjudication.  
Petitioners do not contend that their States’ marriage laws 
violate  an  enumerated  constitutional  right,  such  as  the 
freedom  of  speech  protected  by  the  First  Amendment.  
There  is,  after  all,  no  “Companionship  and  Understanding” or “Nobility and Dignity” Clause in the Constitution.  
See  ante,  at  3,  14.   They  argue  instead  that  the  laws  violate  a  right  implied  by  the  Fourteenth  Amendment’s
requirement  that  “liberty”  may  not  be  deprived  without 
“due process of law.”
  This  Court  has  interpreted  the  Due  Process  Clause  to 
include  a  “substantive”  component  that  protects  certain 
liberty interests against state deprivation “no matter what 
process  is  provided.”    Reno  v.  Flores,  507  U. S.  292,  302  
(1993).  The theory is that some liberties are “so rooted in 
the traditions and conscience of our people as to be ranked 
as  fundamental,”  and  therefore  cannot  be  deprived  with 
 
out compelling justification.  Snyder v. Massachusetts, 291 

 

Cite as:   576 U. S. ____ (2015) 
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 
   
 

11  

U. S. 97, 105 (1934).
  Allowing  unelected  federal  judges  to  select  which  unenumerated  rights  rank  as  “fundamental”—and  to  strike 
down state laws on the basis of that determination—raises 
obvious  concerns  about  the  judicial  role.    Our  precedents 
have accordingly insisted that judges “exercise the utmost 
care”  in  identifying  implied  fundamental  rights,  “lest  the 
liberty  protected  by  the  Due  Process  Clause  be  subtly 
transformed into the policy preferences of the Members of 
this Court.”    Washington v. Glucksberg, 521 U. S. 702, 720  
(1997)  (internal  quotation  marks  omitted);  see  Kennedy, 
Unenumerated  Rights  and  the  Dictates  of  Judicial  Restraint 13 (1986) (Address at Stanford) (“One can conclude 
that certain essential, or fundamental, rights should exist 
in  any  just  society.  It  does  not  follow  that  each  of  those 
essential rights is one that we as judges can enforce under 
the written Constitution.  The Due Process Clause is not a 
guarantee  of  every  right  that  should  inhere  in  an  ideal 
system.”).
  The need for restraint in administering the strong medicine  of  substantive  due  process  is a  lesson  this  Court  has 
learned the hard way.  The Court first applied substantive
due process to strike down a statute in Dred Scott v. Sandford, 19 How. 393 (1857).  There the Court invalidated the 
Missouri  Compromise  on  the  ground  that  legislation  restricting  the  institution  of  slavery  violated  the  implied 
rights of slaveholders.  The Court relied on its own conception  of  liberty  and  property  in  doing  so.    It  asserted  that  
“an act of Congress which deprives a citizen of the United 
States  of  his  liberty  or  property,  merely  because  he  came 
himself or brought his property into a particular Territory 
 
 
of the United States . . . could hardly be dignified with the
name of due process of law.”  Id., at 450.  In a dissent that 
has  outlasted  the  majority  opinion,  Justice  Curtis  explained that when the “fixed rules which govern the interpretation  of  laws  [are]  abandoned,  and  the  theoretical 

12 
 

OBERGEFELL v. HODGES  
 
   
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 

opinions of individuals are allowed to control” the Constitution’s  meaning,  “we  have  no  longer  a  Constitution;  we 
are  under  the  government  of  individual  men,  who  for  the 
time being have power to declare what the Constitution is, 
according  to  their  own  views  of  what  it  ought  to  mean.”   
Id., at 621. 
Dred Scott’s holding was overruled on the battlefields of
the  Civil  War  and  by  constitutional  amendment  after 
Appomattox,  but  its  approach  to  the  Due  Process  Clause 
reappeared.  In a series of early 20th-century cases, most  
prominently  Lochner  v.  New York,  this  Court  invalidated 
state  statutes  that  presented  “meddlesome  interferences 
with the rights of the individual,” and “undue interference 
with liberty of person and freedom of contract.”  198 U. S.,  
at 60, 61.  In Lochner itself, the Court struck down a New 
 
York  law  setting  maximum  hours  for  bakery  employees, 
because  there  was  “in  our  judgment,  no  reasonable  foundation for holding this to be necessary or appropriate as a 
health law.”  Id., at 58.  
  The  dissenting  Justices  in  Lochner  explained  that  the 
New York law could be viewed as a reasonable response to 
legislative  concern  about  the  health  of  bakery  employees, 
an issue on which there was at least “room for debate and 
for an honest difference of opinion.”  Id., at 72 (opinion of 
Harlan,  J.).    The  majority’s  contrary  conclusion  required 
adopting as constitutional law “an economic theory which 
a large part of the country does not entertain.”  Id., at 75 
 
(opinion of Holmes, J.).
 As Justice Holmes memorably put
it,  “The  Fourteenth  Amendment  does  not  enact  Mr.  Herbert  Spencer’s  Social  Statics,”  a  leading  work  on  the  philosophy  of  Social  Darwinism.    Ibid.   The  Constitution  “is 
not intended to embody a particular economic theory . . . .  
It is made for people of fundamentally differing views, and 
the  accident  of  our  finding  certain  opinions  natural  and 
familiar or novel and even shocking ought not to conclude
our judgment upon the question whether statutes embody-

 

Cite as:   576 U. S. ____ (2015) 
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 
   
 

13  

ing them conflict with the Constitution.”  Id., at 75–76. 
  In  the  decades  after  Lochner,  the  Court  struck  down  
nearly  200  laws  as  violations  of  individual  liberty,  often 
over  strong  dissents  contending  that  “[t]he  criterion  of 
constitutionality  is  not  whether  we  believe  the  law  to  be 
for  the  public  good.”  Adkins  v.   Children’s Hospital of
 
D. C., 261 U. S. 525, 570 (1923) (opinion of Holmes, J.).  By
empowering  judges  to  elevate  their  own  policy  judgments 
to  the  status  of  constitutionally  protected  “liberty,”  the  
Lochner  line  of  cases  left  “no  alternative  to  regarding  the 
court  as  a  . . .  legislative  chamber.”    L.  Hand,  The  Bill  of 
Rights 42 (1958).
  Eventually,  the  Court  recognized  its  error  and  vowed 
not to repeat it.  “The doctrine that . . . due process authorizes courts to hold laws unconstitutional when they believe 
the  legislature  has  acted  unwisely,”  we  later  explained, 
“has  long  since  been  discarded.    We  have  returned  to  the 
original  constitutional  proposition  that  courts  do  not 
substitute  their  social  and  economic  beliefs  for  the  judgment  of  legislative  bodies,  who  are  elected  to  pass  laws.”  
Ferguson  v.   Skrupa,  372  U. S.  726,  730  (1963);  see  DayBrite Lighting, Inc. v. Missouri, 342 U. S. 421, 423 (1952) 
(“we do not sit as a super-legislature to weigh the wisdom 
of legislation”).  Thus, it has become an accepted rule that 
the  Court  will  not  hold  laws  unconstitutional  simply  because  we  find  them  “unwise,  improvident,  or  out  of  harmony with a particular school of thought.”  Williamson v.  
Lee Optical of Okla., Inc., 348 U. S. 483, 488 (1955). 
Rejecting  Lochner  does  not  require  disavowing  the 
doctrine of implied fundamental rights, and this Court has 
not  done  so.  But  to  avoid  repeating  Lochner’s  error  of  
converting  personal  preferences  into  constitutional  mandates,  our  modern  substantive  due  process  cases  have 
stressed  the  need  for  “judicial  self-restraint.”     Collins  v.  
 
Harker Heights, 503 U. S. 115, 125 (1992).  Our precedents
have  required  that  implied  fundamental  rights  be  “objec-

14 
 

OBERGEFELL v. HODGES  
 
   
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 

tively,  deeply  rooted  in  this  Nation’s  history  and  tradition,” and “implicit in the concept of ordered liberty, such 
that  neither  liberty  nor  justice  would  exist  if  they  were 
sacrificed.”  Glucksberg,  521  U. S.,  at  720–721  (internal 
quotation marks omitted). 
  Although  the  Court  articulated  the  importance  of  his- 
tory and tradition to the fundamental rights inquiry most 
 precisely in Glucksberg, many other cases both before and 
after  have  adopted  the  same  approach.  See,  e.g.,  District
Attorney’s Office for Third Judicial Dist.  v.  Osborne,  557 
U. S. 52, 72 (2009); Flores, 507 U. S., at 303; United States 
v. Salerno, 481 U. S. 739, 751 (1987); Moore v. East Cleveland, 431 U. S. 494, 503 (1977) (plurality opinion); see also  
id.,  at  544  (White,  J.,  dissenting)  (“The  Judiciary,  including  this  Court,  is  the  most  vulnerable  and  comes  nearest
to  illegitimacy  when  it  deals  with  judge-made  constitutional  law  having  little  or  no  cognizable  roots  in  the  language  or  even  the  design  of  the  Constitution.”);  Troxel  v.  
Granville,  530  U. S.  57,  96–101  (2000)  (KENNEDY,  J., 
dissenting) (consulting “ ‘[o]ur Nation’s history, legal traditions,  and  practices’ ”  and  concluding  that  “[w]e  owe  it  to 
the  Nation’s  domestic  relations  legal  structure  . . .  to 
proceed  with  caution”  (quoting  Glucksberg,  521  U. S.,  at  
721)).
  Proper  reliance  on  history  and  tradition  of  course  requires looking beyond the individual law being challenged, 
so that every restriction on liberty does not supply its own 
constitutional justification.  The Court is right about that.   
Ante, at 18.  But given the few “guideposts for responsible 
decisionmaking  in  this  unchartered  area,”  Collins,  503 
U. S.,  at  125,  “an  approach  grounded  in  history  imposes 
limits on the judiciary that are more meaningful than any 
based on [an] abstract formula,” Moore, 431 U. S., at 504,  
n. 12 (plurality opinion).  Expanding a right suddenly and 
dramatically  is  likely  to  require  tearing  it  up  from  its  
 
 
roots.  Even a sincere profession of “discipline” in identify-

 

Cite as:   576 U. S. ____ (2015) 
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 
   
 

15  

ing fundamental rights, ante, at 10–11, does not provide a 
meaningful  constraint  on  a  judge,  for  “what  he  is  really
likely to be ‘discovering,’ whether or not he is fully aware 
of it, are his own values,” J. Ely, Democracy and Distrust 
44  (1980).  The  only  way  to  ensure  restraint  in  this  delicate  enterprise  is  “continual  insistence  upon  respect  for 
the  teachings  of  history,  solid  recognition  of  the  basic
values  that  underlie our  society,  and  wise  appreciation  of 
the great roles [of] the doctrines of federalism and separation  of  powers.”  Griswold  v.  Connecticut,  381  U. S.  479,  
501 (1965) (Harlan, J., concurring in judgment). 

  The  majority  acknowledges  none  of  this  doctrinal  background,  and  it  is  easy  to  see  why:  Its  aggressive  application  of  substantive  due  process  breaks  sharply  with  decades  of  precedent  and  returns  the  Court  to  the 
unprincipled approach of Lochner. 

  The  majority’s  driving  themes  are  that  marriage  is 
desirable and petitioners desire it.  The opinion describes
the “transcendent importance” of marriage and repeatedly 
insists that petitioners do not seek to “demean,” “devalue,” 
“denigrate,” or “disrespect” the institution.  Ante, at 3, 4, 6,  
28.  Nobody disputes those points.  Indeed, the compelling 
personal  accounts  of  petitioners  and  others  like  them  are 
likely  a  primary  reason  why  many  Americans  have 
changed  their  minds  about  whether  same-sex  couples 
should be allowed to marry.  As a matter of constitutional 
law,  however,  the  sincerity  of  petitioners’  wishes  is  not 
relevant. 
  When  the  majority  turns  to  the  law,  it  relies  primarily 
 
  
on precedents discussing the fundamental “right to marry.” 
Turner  v.   Safley,  482  U. S.  78,  95  (1987);  Zablocki, 
434 U. S., at 383; see Loving, 388 U. S., at 12.  These cases 

16 
 

OBERGEFELL v. HODGES  
 
   
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 

do not hold, of course, that anyone who wants to get married  has  a  constitutional  right  to  do  so.    They  instead 
require  a  State  to  justify  barriers  to  marriage  as  that 
institution  has  always  been  understood.    In   Loving,  the  
Court  held  that  racial  restrictions  on  the  right  to  marry 
lacked a compelling justification.  In Zablocki, restrictions  
based  on  child  support  debts  did  not  suffice.    In   Turner, 
restrictions  based  on  status  as  a  prisoner  were  deemed 
impermissible. 
  None  of  the  laws  at  issue  in  those  cases  purported  to 
change  the  core  definition  of  marriage  as  the  union  of  a 
 
man and a  woman.  The laws challenged in Zablocki and 
Turner did not define marriage as “the union of a man and 
a  woman,  where neither party owes child support or is in
prison.”  Nor  did  the  interracial  marriage  ban  at  issue  in 
Loving  define  marriage  as  “the  union  of  a  man  and  a  
woman  of the same race.”  See  Tragen,  Comment,  Statutory  Prohibitions  Against  Interracial  Marriage,  32  Cal. 
L. Rev.  269  (1944)  (“at  common  law  there  was  no  ban  on 
interracial  marriage”);   post,  at  11–12,  n. 5  (THOMAS,  J.,  
dissenting).  Removing  racial  barriers  to  marriage  therefore  did  not  change  what  a  marriage  was  any  more  than 
integrating  schools  changed  what  a  school  was.    As  the 
majority admits, the institution of “marriage” discussed in 
every  one  of  these  cases  “presumed  a  relationship  involving opposite-sex partners.”  Ante, at 11. 
  In  short,  the  “right  to  marry”  cases  stand  for  the  important but limited proposition that particular restrictions 
on  access  to  marriage  as traditionally defined violate  due 
process.  These precedents say nothing at all about a right 
to make a State change its definition of marriage, which is 
the right petitioners actually seek here.  See Windsor, 570 
U. S.,  at  ___  (ALITO,  J.,  dissenting)  (slip  op.,  at  8)  (“What 
Windsor and the United States seek . . . is not the protection  of  a  deeply  rooted  right  but  the  recognition  of  a  very 
new  right.”).    Neither  petitioners  nor  the  majority  cites  a 

 

Cite as:   576 U. S. ____ (2015) 
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 
   
 

17  

single  case  or  other  legal  source  providing  any  basis  for 
such  a  constitutional  right.    None  exists,  and  that  is  
enough to foreclose their claim. 

  The  majority  suggests  that  “there  are  other,  more  instructive precedents” informing the right to marry.  Ante, 
at 12.  Although not entirely clear, this reference seems to 
correspond to a line of cases discussing an implied fundamental “right of privacy.”  Griswold, 381 U. S., at 486.  In  
the  first  of  those  cases,  the  Court  invalidated  a  criminal  
law  that  banned  the  use  of  contraceptives.    Id.,  at  485– 
486.  The  Court  stressed  the  invasive  nature  of  the  ban,  
which threatened the intrusion of “the police to search the 
sacred precincts of marital bedrooms.”  Id., at 485.  In the 
Court’s view, such laws infringed the right to privacy in its 
most basic sense: the “right to be let alone.”  Eisenstadt v. 
Baird, 405 U. S. 438, 453–454, n. 10 (1972) (internal quotation marks omitted); see Olmstead v. United States, 277 
U. S. 438, 478 (1928) (Brandeis, J., dissenting).
  The Court also invoked the right to privacy in Lawrence 
v. Texas, 539 U. S. 558 (2003), which struck down a Texas 
statute  criminalizing  homosexual  sodomy.  Lawrence 
relied on the position that criminal sodomy laws, like bans 
on  contraceptives,  invaded  privacy  by  inviting  “unwarranted  government  intrusions”  that  “touc[h]  upon  the 
most  private  human  conduct,  sexual  behavior  . . .  in  the 
most private of places, the home.”  Id., at 562, 567. 
Neither  Lawrence  nor  any  other  precedent  in  the  privacy line of cases supports the right that petitioners assert 
here.  Unlike  criminal  laws  banning  contraceptives  and
sodomy,  the  marriage  laws  at  issue  here  involve  no  government  intrusion.  They  create  no  crime  and  impose  no  
 
 
punishment.  Same-sex couples remain free to live together,
to  engage  in  intimate  conduct,  and  to  raise  their  fami- 
lies as they see fit.  No one is “condemned to live in loneli-

18 
 

OBERGEFELL v. HODGES  
 
   
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 

ness” by the laws challenged in these cases—no one.   Ante, 
at 28.  At the same time, the laws in no way interfere with 
 
the “right to be let alone.” 
  The  majority  also  relies  on  Justice  Harlan’s  influential 
dissenting opinion in Poe v. Ullman, 367 U. S. 497 (1961).  
As  the  majority  recounts,  that  opinion  states  that  “[d]ue 
process has not been reduced to any formula.”  Id., at 542. 
But  far  from  conferring  the  broad  interpretive  discretion 
that the majority discerns, Justice Harlan’s opinion makes 
clear  that  courts  implying  fundamental  rights  are  not 
“free  to  roam  where  unguided  speculation  might  take 
them.”  Ibid.    They  must  instead  have  “regard  to  what 
history  teaches”  and  exercise  not  only  “judgment”  but 
“restraint.”  Ibid.  Of particular relevance, Justice Harlan 
explained  that  “laws  regarding  marriage  which  provide 
both  when  the  sexual  powers  may  be  used  and  the  legal 
and  societal  context  in  which  children  are  born  and 
brought  up  . . .  form  a  pattern  so  deeply  pressed  into  the 
substance  of  our  social  life  that  any  Constitutional  doctrine in this area must build upon that basis.”  Id., at 546.  
  In  sum,  the  privacy  cases  provide  no  support  for  the 
majority’s  position,  because  petitioners  do   not  seek  pri- 
vacy.  Quite  the  opposite,  they  seek  public  recognition  of 
their  relationships,  along  with  corresponding  government 
benefits.  Our  cases  have  consistently  refused  to  allow 
litigants  to  convert  the  shield  provided  by  constitutional 
liberties  into  a  sword  to  demand  positive  entitlements 
from the State.  See DeShaney v. Winnebago County Dept.
of Social Servs.,  489  U. S.  189,  196  (1989);  San Antonio
Independent School Dist. v. Rodriguez, 411 U. S. 1, 35–37 
 
(1973);  post,  at  9–13  (THOMAS,  J.,  dissenting).    Thus, 
although the right to privacy recognized by our precedents 
certainly plays a role in protecting the intimate conduct of 
same-sex couples, it provides no affirmative right to redefine  marriage  and  no  basis  for  striking  down  the  laws  at 
issue here.  

 

Cite as:   576 U. S. ____ (2015) 
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 
   
 

19  


  Perhaps  recognizing  how  little  support  it   can  derive 
from precedent, the majority goes out of its way to jettison 
the  “careful”  approach  to  implied  fundamental  rights
taken  by  this  Court  in  Glucksberg.  Ante,  at  18  (quoting  
521 U. S., at 721).  It is revealing that the majority’s position  requires  it  to  effectively  overrule  Glucksberg,  the 
leading modern case setting the bounds of substantive due 
process.  At least this part of the majority opinion has the 
virtue of candor.  Nobody could rightly accuse the majority 
of taking a careful approach. 
  Ultimately,  only  one  precedent  offers  any  support  for 
the  majority’s  methodology:  Lochner  v.  New York,  198 
U. S.  45.  The  majority  opens  its  opinion  by  announcing 
petitioners’  right  to  “define  and  express  their  identity.”   
Ante, at 1–2.  The majority later explains that “the right to 
personal  choice  regarding  marriage  is  inherent  in  the 
concept  of  individual  autonomy.”    Ante,  at  12.    This  freewheeling notion of individual autonomy echoes nothing so 
much as “the general right of an individual to be free in his
 
person and in his power to contract in relation to his own 
labor.”  Lochner, 198 U. S., at 58 (emphasis added).
  To  be  fair,  the  majority  does  not  suggest  that  its  individual  autonomy  right  is  entirely  unconstrained.  The 
constraints it sets are precisely those that accord with its 
own  “reasoned  judgment,”  informed  by  its  “new  insight”
into  the  “nature  of  injustice,”  which  was  invisible  to  all
who  came  before  but  has  become  clear  “as  we  learn  [the] 
meaning”  of  liberty.    Ante,  at  10,  11.    The  truth  is  that  
today’s decision rests on nothing more than the majority’s 
own conviction that same-sex couples should be allowed to 
marry because they want to, and that “it would disparage 
their choices and diminish their personhood to deny them 
this  right.”     Ante,  at  19.  Whatever  force  that  belief  may 
have as a matter of moral philosophy, it has no more basis 
in the Constitution than did the naked policy preferences  

20 
 

OBERGEFELL v. HODGES  
 
   
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 

adopted  in  Lochner.    See  198  U. S.,  at  61  (“We  do  not 
believe  in  the  soundness  of  the  views  which  uphold  this 
law,”  which  “is  an  illegal  interference  with  the  rights  of 
individuals  . . .  to  make  contracts  regarding  labor  upon 
such terms as they may think best”). 
  The  majority  recognizes  that  today’s  cases  do  not  mark 
“the  first  time  the  Court  has  been  asked  to  adopt  a  cautious approach to recognizing and protecting fundamental 
rights.”  Ante, at 25.  On that much, we agree.  The Court 
was  “asked”—and  it  agreed—to  “adopt  a   cautious  approach”  to  implying  fundamental  rights  after  the  debacle 
of  the  Lochner  era.    Today,  the  majority  casts  caution 
aside and revives the grave errors of that period. 
  One  immediate  question  invited  by  the  majority’s  position  is  whether  States  may  retain  the  definition  of  marriage as a union of two people.  Cf. Brown v. Buhman, 947  
F. Supp.  2d  1170  (Utah  2013),  appeal  pending,  No.  144117 (CA10).  Although the majority randomly inserts the 
adjective “two” in various places, it offers no reason at all 
why the two-person element of the core definition of marriage  may  be  preserved  while  the  man-woman  element 
may not.  Indeed, from the standpoint of history and tradition,  a  leap  from  opposite-sex  marriage  to  same-sex  marriage is much greater than one from a two-person union to 
plural  unions,  which  have  deep  roots  in  some  cultures 
around the world.  If the majority is willing to take the big 
leap, it is hard to see how it can say no to the shorter one.
  It  is  striking  how  much  of  the  majority’s  reasoning 
would apply with equal force to the claim of a fundamental 
 
 
right to plural marriage.  If “[t]here is dignity in the bond
between two men or two women who seek to marry and in 
their  autonomy  to  make  such  profound  choices,”  ante,  at 
13,  why  would  there  be  any  less  dignity  in  the  bond  between  three  people  who,  in  exercising  their  autonomy, 
seek to make the profound choice to marry?  If a same-sex 
couple has the constitutional right to marry because their  

 

Cite as:   576 U. S. ____ (2015) 
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 
   
 

21  

children  would  otherwise  “suffer  the  stigma  of  knowing 
their  families  are  somehow  lesser,”  ante,  at  15,  why 
wouldn’t the same reasoning apply to a family of three or 
more  persons  raising  children?    If  not  having  the  opportunity to marry “serves to disrespect and subordinate” gay 
and lesbian couples, why wouldn’t the same “imposition of 
this disability,” ante, at 22, serve to disrespect and subordinate  people  who  find  fulfillment  in  polyamorous  relationships?  See  Bennett,  Polyamory:  The  Next  Sexual 
Revolution? Newsweek, July 28, 2009 (estimating 500,000 
polyamorous  families  in  the  United  States);  Li,  Married 
Lesbian “Throuple” Expecting First Child, N. Y. Post, Apr. 
23, 2014; Otter, Three May Not Be a Crowd: The Case for 
a Constitutional Right to Plural Marriage, 64 Emory L. J. 
1977 (2015).
  I  do  not  mean  to  equate  marriage  between  same-sex 
couples with plural marriages in all respects.  There may 
well  be  relevant  differences  that  compel  different  legal 
analysis.  But if there are, petitioners have not pointed to 
any.  When  asked  about  a  plural  marital  union  at  oral 
argument,  petitioners  asserted  that  a  State  “doesn’t  have 
such an institution.”  Tr. of Oral Arg. on Question 2, p. 6.  
But  that  is  exactly  the  point:  the  States  at  issue  here  do 
not have an institution of same-sex marriage, either. 

  Near the end of its opinion, the majority offers perhaps 
the clearest insight into its decision.  Expanding marriage 
to  include  same-sex  couples,  the  majority  insists,  would 
“pose  no  risk  of  harm  to  themselves  or  third  parties.”  
Ante,  at  27.  This  argument  again  echoes   Lochner,  which  
relied on its assessment that “we think that a law like the 
one  before  us  involves  neither  the  safety,  the  morals  nor 
the  welfare  of  the  public,  and  that  the  interest  of  the
public  is  not  in  the  slightest  degree  affected  by  such  an 
act.”  198 U. S., at 57. 

22 
 

OBERGEFELL v. HODGES  
 
   
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 

  Then  and  now,  this  assertion  of  the  “harm   principle” 
sounds more in philosophy than law.  The elevation of the 
fullest individual self-realization over the constraints that 
society has expressed in law may or may not be attractive 
moral  philosophy.  But  a  Justice’s  commission  does  not  
confer  any  special  moral,  philosophical,  or  social  insight 
sufficient  to  justify  imposing  those  perceptions  on  fellow 
citizens  under  the  pretense  of  “due  process.”  There  is 
indeed a process due the people on issues of this sort—the 
democratic  process.  Respecting  that  understanding  requires  the  Court  to  be  guided  by  law,  not  any  particular 
school  of  social  thought.    As  Judge  Henry  Friendly  once 
put  it,  echoing  Justice  Holmes’s  dissent  in   Lochner,  the 
Fourteenth Amendment does not enact John Stuart Mill’s 
On  Liberty  any  more  than  it  enacts  Herbert  Spencer’s 
Social  Statics.    See  Randolph,  Before  Roe  v. Wade:  Judge 
Friendly’s  Draft  Abortion  Opinion,  29  Harv.   J. L.  &  Pub. 
Pol’y 1035, 1036–1037, 1058 (2006).  And it certainly does 
not enact any one concept of marriage.
  The  majority’s  understanding  of  due  process  lays  out  a
tantalizing vision of the future for Members of this Court: 
If  an  unvarying  social  institution  enduring  over  all  of 
recorded  history  cannot  inhibit  judicial  policymaking, 
what can?    But this approach is dangerous for the rule of 
law.  The  purpose  of  insisting  that  implied  fundamental 
rights have roots in the history and tradition of our people 
is to ensure that when unelected judges strike down democratically  enacted  laws,  they  do  so  based  on  something 
more  than  their  own  beliefs.  The  Court  today  not  only 
overlooks  our  country’s  entire  history  and  tradition  but 
actively repudiates it, preferring to live only in the heady 
days of the here and now.  I agree with the majority that 
the “nature of injustice is that we may not always see it in 
our own times.”  Ante, at 11.  As petitioners put it, “times 
can blind.”  Tr. of Oral Arg. on Question 1, at 9, 10.  But to 
blind yourself to history is both prideful and unwise.  “The 

 

Cite as:   576 U. S. ____ (2015) 
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 
   
 

23  

past  is  never  dead.    It’s  not  even  past.”  W.  Faulkner, 
Requiem for a Nun 92 (1951). 
III  
  In  addition  to  their  due  process  argument,  petitioners 
contend  that  the  Equal  Protection  Clause  requires  their 
States  to  license  and  recognize  same-sex  marriages.  The  
majority  does  not  seriously  engage  with  this  claim.  Its  
discussion is, quite frankly, difficult to follow.  The central 
point  seems  to  be  that  there  is  a  “synergy  between”  the 
Equal Protection Clause and the Due Process Clause, and 
that  some  precedents  relying  on  one  Clause  have  also 
relied on the other.  Ante, at 20.  Absent from this portion 
of the opinion, however, is anything resembling our usual 
framework for deciding equal protection cases.  It is casebook  doctrine  that  the  “modern  Supreme  Court’s  treatment  of  equal  protection  claims  has  used  a  means-ends 
methodology  in  which  judges  ask  whether  the  classification  the  government  is  using  is  sufficiently  related  to  the 
goals  it  is  pursuing.”    G.  Stone,  L.  Seidman,  C.  Sunstein,  
M. Tushnet, & P. Karlan, Constitutional Law 453 (7th ed. 
2013).  The majority’s approach today is different: 
“Rights implicit in liberty and rights secured by equal 
protection  may  rest  on  different  precepts  and  are  not
always  co-extensive,  yet  in  some  instances  each  may 
be  instructive  as  to  the  meaning  and  reach  of  the 
other.  In  any  particular  case  one  Clause  may  be 
thought to capture the essence of the right in a more 
accurate  and  comprehensive  way,  even  as  the  two 
Clauses may converge in the identification and definition of the right.”  Ante, at 19. 
  The majority goes on to assert in conclusory fashion that 
the Equal Protection Clause provides an alternative basis 
for its holding.  Ante, at 22.  Yet the majority fails to provide  even  a  single  sentence  explaining  how  the  Equal 

24 
 

OBERGEFELL v. HODGES  
 
   
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 

Protection  Clause  supplies  independent  weight  for  its 
position, nor does it attempt to justify its gratuitous violation of the canon against unnecessarily resolving constitutional  questions.    See  Northwest Austin Municipal Util.
Dist. No. One v. Holder, 557 U. S. 193, 197 (2009).  In any 
event,  the  marriage  laws  at  issue  here  do  not  violate  the 
Equal  Protection  Clause,  because  distinguishing  between 
opposite-sex  and  same-sex  couples  is  rationally  related  to 
the  States’  “legitimate  state  interest”  in  “preserving  the 
traditional  institution  of  marriage.” Lawrence,  539  U. S., 
at 585 (O’Connor, J., concurring in judgment). 
  It  is  important  to  note  with  precision  which  laws  petitioners  have  challenged.  Although  they  discuss  some  of
the ancillary legal benefits that accompany marriage, such 
as  hospital  visitation  rights  and  recognition  of  spousal 
status  on  official  documents,  petitioners’  lawsuits  target 
the  laws  defining  marriage  generally  rather  than  those 
allocating  benefits  specifically.  The  equal  protection
analysis  might  be  different,  in  my  view,  if  we  were  confronted  with  a  more  focused  challenge  to  the  denial  of 
certain  tangible  benefits.    Of  course,  those  more  selective 
claims  will  not  arise  now  that  the  Court  has  taken  the 
drastic  step  of  requiring  every  State  to  license  and  recognize marriages between same-sex couples.  
IV 
  The  legitimacy  of  this  Court  ultimately  rests  “upon  the 
respect  accorded  to  its  judgments.”    Republican Party of
Minn.  v.  White,  536  U. S.  765,  793  (2002)  (KENNEDY,  J., 
concurring).  That respect flows from the perception—and 
reality—that  we  exercise  humility  and  restraint  in  deciding cases according to the Constitution and law.  The role 
of the Court envisioned by the majority today, however, is 
anything  but  humble  or  restrained.    Over  and  over,  the 
majority exalts the role of the judiciary in delivering social 
change.  In  the  majority’s  telling,  it  is  the  courts,  not  the  

 

Cite as:   576 U. S. ____ (2015) 
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 
   
 

25  

people, who are responsible for making “new dimensions of 
freedom  . . .  apparent   to  new  generations,”  for  providing 
“formal discourse” on social issues, and for ensuring “neutral discussions, without scornful or disparaging commentary.”  Ante, at 7–9. 
  Nowhere  is  the  majority’s  extravagant  conception  of 
judicial supremacy more evident than in its description—
and  dismissal—of  the  public  debate  regarding  same-sex 
marriage.  Yes,  the  majority  concedes,  on  one  side  are 
thousands  of  years  of  human  history  in  every  society
known  to  have  populated  the  planet.  But  on  the  other 
side, there has been “extensive litigation,” “many thoughtful  District  Court  decisions,”  “countless  studies,  papers, 
books,  and  other  popular  and  scholarly  writings,”  and 
“more than 100” amicus briefs in these cases alone.    Ante, 
at  9,  10,  23.  What  would  be  the  point  of  allowing  the 
democratic process to go on?  It is high time for the Court 
to decide the meaning of marriage, based on five lawyers’ 
“better informed understanding” of “a liberty that remains 
 
urgent in our own era.”  Ante, at 19.  The answer is surely 
there in one of those amicus briefs or studies.  
  Those who founded our country would not recognize the 
majority’s  conception  of  the  judicial  role.    They  after  all 
risked  their  lives  and  fortunes  for  the  precious  right  to 
govern  themselves.    They  would  never  have  imagined
yielding  that  right  on  a  question  of  social  policy  to  unaccountable and unelected judges.  And they certainly would 
not have been satisfied by a system empowering judges to 
override  policy  judgments  so  long  as  they  do  so  after  “a 
quite extensive discussion.”  Ante, at 8.  In our democracy, 
debate  about  the  content  of  the  law  is  not  an  exhaustion  
requirement  to  be  checked  off  before  courts  can  impose 
their will.  “Surely the Constitution does not put either the 
legislative  branch  or  the  executive  branch  in  the  position 
of a television quiz show contestant so that when a given 
period  of  time  has  elapsed  and  a  problem  remains  unre-

26 
 

OBERGEFELL v. HODGES  
 
   
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 

solved  by  them,  the  federal  judiciary  may  press  a  buzzer 
and  take  its  turn  at  fashioning  a  solution.”  Rehnquist,
The Notion of a Living Constitution, 54 Texas L. Rev. 693, 
700 (1976).  As a plurality of this Court explained just last
year,  “It  is  demeaning  to  the  democratic  process  to  presume  that  voters  are  not  capable  of  deciding  an  issue  of 
this sensitivity on decent and rational grounds.”  Schuette 
v.  BAMN,  572  U. S.  ___,  ___  –___  (2014)  (slip  op.,  at  16– 
17).
  The  Court’s  accumulation  of  power  does  not  occur  in  a  
vacuum.  It comes at the expense of the people.  And they  
know  it.    Here  and  abroad,  people  are  in  the  midst  of  a 
serious and thoughtful public debate on the issue of samesex marriage.  They see voters carefully considering samesex  marriage,  casting  ballots  in  favor  or  opposed,  and 
sometimes changing their minds.  They see political leaders  similarly  reexamining  their  positions,  and  either  reversing  course  or  explaining  adherence  to  old  convictions 
confirmed  anew.  They  see  governments  and  businesses 
modifying  policies  and  practices  with  respect  to  same-sex 
couples,  and  participating  actively  in  the  civic  discourse.  
They  see  countries  overseas  democratically  accepting 
profound  social  change,  or  declining  to  do  so.  This  deliberative  process  is  making  people  take  seriously  questions 
that they may not have even regarded as questions before. 
  When decisions are reached through democratic means, 
some  people  will  inevitably  be  disappointed  with  the  results.  But those whose views do not prevail at least know 
that they have had their say, and accordingly are—in the
 
 
tradition  of  our  political  culture—reconciled  to  the  result 
of a fair and honest debate.  In addition, they can gear up 
to raise the issue later, hoping to persuade enough on the
winning  side  to  think  again.  “That  is  exactly  how  our
system  of  government  is  supposed  to  work.”    Post,  at  2–3  
(SCALIA, J., dissenting).
  But today the Court puts a stop to all that.  By deciding  

 

Cite as:   576 U. S. ____ (2015) 
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 
   
 

27  

this question under the Constitution, the Court removes it 
from  the  realm  of  democratic  decision.  There  will  be  
consequences to shutting down the political process on an 
issue of such profound public significance.  Closing debate 
tends to close minds.  People denied a voice are less likely 
to  accept  the  ruling  of  a  court  on  an  issue  that  does  not 
seem  to  be  the  sort  of  thing  courts  usually  decide.    As  a  
thoughtful  commentator  observed  about  another  issue, 
“The political process was moving . . . , not swiftly enough 
for  advocates  of  quick,  complete  change,  but  majoritarian 
institutions  were  listening  and  acting.  Heavy-handed
judicial intervention was difficult to justify and appears to 
have  provoked,  not  resolved,  conflict.”    Ginsburg,  Some 
Thoughts on Autonomy and Equality in Relation to Roe  v. 
Wade,  63  N. C.  L. Rev.  375,  385–386  (1985)  (footnote 
omitted).  Indeed,  however  heartened  the  proponents  of 
same-sex  marriage  might  be  on  this  day,  it  is  worth  acknowledging  what  they  have  lost,  and  lost  forever:  the 
opportunity  to  win  the  true  acceptance  that  comes  from 
persuading  their  fellow  citizens  of  the  justice  of  their  
cause.  And  they  lose  this  just  when  the  winds  of  change 
were freshening at their backs. 
  Federal  courts  are  blunt  instruments  when  it  comes  to 
creating  rights.    They  have  constitutional  power  only  to 
resolve  concrete  cases  or  controversies;  they  do  not  have 
the flexibility of legislatures to address concerns of parties 
not  before  the  court  or  to  anticipate  problems  that  may 
arise  from  the  exercise  of  a  new  right.    Today’s  decision, 
for  example,  creates  serious  questions  about  religious 
liberty.  Many  good  and  decent  people  oppose  same-sex 
marriage as a tenet of faith, and their freedom to exercise
religion  is—unlike  the  right  imagined  by  the  majority—
actually spelled out in the Constitution.  Amdt. 1. 
  Respect  for  sincere  religious  conviction  has  led  voters 
and  legislators  in  every  State  that  has  adopted  same-sex 
marriage  democratically  to  include  accommodations  for  

28 
 

OBERGEFELL v. HODGES  
 
   
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 

religious practice.  The majority’s decision imposing samesex marriage cannot, of course, create any such accommodations.  The  majority  graciously  suggests  that  religious
believers  may  continue  to  “advocate”  and  “teach”  their 
views  of  marriage.  Ante,  at  27.    The  First  Amendment 
guarantees,  however,  the  freedom  to  “exercise”  religion.  
Ominously, that is not a word the majority uses. 
  Hard  questions  arise  when  people  of  faith  exercise 
religion in ways that may be seen to conflict with the new 
right  to  same-sex  marriage—when,  for  example,  a  religious  college  provides  married  student  housing  only  to 
opposite-sex  married  couples,  or  a  religious  adoption 
agency  declines  to  place  children  with  same-sex  married 
couples.  Indeed,  the  Solicitor  General  candidly  acknowledged  that  the  tax  exemptions  of  some  religious  institutions would be in question if they opposed same-sex marriage.  See Tr. of Oral Arg. on Question 1, at 36–38.  There  
is little doubt that these and similar questions will soon be 
before this Court.  Unfortunately, people of faith can take 
no comfort in the treatment they receive from the majority 
today. 
  Perhaps the most discouraging aspect of today’s decision 
is the extent to which the majority feels compelled to sully 
those on the other side of the debate.  The majority offers a
cursory  assurance  that  it  does  not  intend  to  disparage 
people who, as a matter of conscience, cannot accept samesex  marriage.    Ante,   at  19.    That  disclaimer  is  hard  to 
square with the very next sentence, in which the majority 
explains  that  “the  necessary  consequence”  of  laws  codifying  the  traditional  definition  of  marriage  is  to  “demea[n] 
or stigmatiz[e]” same-sex couples.  Ante, at 19.  The majority reiterates such characterizations over and over.  By the 
majority’s account, Americans who did nothing more than 
follow the understanding of marriage that has existed for 
our  entire  history—in  particular,  the  tens  of  millions  of 
people who voted to reaffirm their States’ enduring defini-

 

Cite as:   576 U. S. ____ (2015) 
 
ROBERTS, C. J., dissenting 
   
 

29  

tion of marriage—have acted to “lock . . . out,” “disparage,”
 
 
“disrespect  and  subordinate,”  and  inflict  “[d]ignitary 
wounds”  upon  their  gay  and  lesbian  neighbors.    Ante,  at 
17, 19, 22, 25.  These apparent assaults on the character of 
fairminded  people  will  have  an   effect,  in  society  and  in 
court.  See post, at 6–7 (ALITO, J., dissenting).  Moreover, 
they are entirely gratuitous.  It is one thing for the major- 
ity  to  conclude  that  the  Constitution  protects  a  right  to 
same-sex  marriage;  it  is  something  else  to  portray  everyone  who  does  not  share  the  majority’s  “better  informed 
understanding” as bigoted.  Ante, at 19. 
  In  the  face  of  all  this,  a  much  different  view  of  the  
Court’s  role  is  possible.    That  view  is  more  modest  and 
restrained.  It  is  more  skeptical  that  the  legal  abilities  of 
judges  also  reflect  insight  into  moral  and  philosophical 
issues.  It  is  more  sensitive  to  the  fact  that  judges  are 
unelected  and  unaccountable,  and  that  the  legitimacy  of 
their power depends on confining it to the exercise of legal 
judgment.  It is more attuned to the lessons of history, and 
what  it  has  meant  for  the  country  and  Court  when  Jus- 
tices  have  exceeded  their  proper  bounds.    And  it  is  less  
pretentious than to suppose that while people around the 
world  have  viewed  an  institution  in  a  particular  way  for 
thousands  of  years,  the  present  generation  and  the  present Court are the ones chosen to burst the bonds of that 
history and tradition. 
*    *    * 
  If  you  are  among  the  many  Americans—of  whatever 
sexual  orientation—who  favor  expanding  same-sex  marriage,  by  all  means  celebrate  today’s  decision.  Celebrate 
the  achievement  of  a  desired  goal.    Celebrate  the  opportunity  for  a  new  expression  of  commitment  to  a  partner.  
Celebrate  the  availability  of  new  benefits.  But  do  not 
celebrate the Constitution.  It had nothing to do with it.
  I respectfully dissent.