NEW CASES IN THOUSANDS 223 143 209 43 43 66 24 22 218 22 17 58 21 71 68 20 37 43 12 8 8 157 51 40 37 22 20 19 13 32 14 15 13 11 15 9 11 8 8 4 1 0.3 LUNG COLON/RECTUM BREAST PANCREAS LEUKEMIA NON-HDG. LYMPHOMA LIVER BRAIN, NERVE PROSTATE OVARY ESOPHAGUS KIDNEY STOMACH BLADDER MELANOMA MYELOMA ORAL /PHARYNX UTERUS CERVIX HODGKIN LYMPHOMA TESTES CANCER TYPE 2010, UNITED STATES IN MILLIONS OF YEARS OF LIFE LOST 2.37 0.76 0.76 0.50 0.36 0.29 0.29 0.29 0.27 0.25 0.21 0.20 0.18 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.14 0.12 0.10 0.03 0.01 NCI FUNDING, IN MILLIONS $282 270 631 97 296 122 73 193 301 112 31 90 15 23 102 49 14 14 77 15 6 MEDIAN AGE* AT DIAGNOSIS AND DEATH 70 72 69 74 61 68 71 73 66 75 66 76 63 68 57 64 66 80 63 71 67 69 64 71 69 72 73 79 61 69 69 75 62 67 62 71 49 57 38 64 33 40 DEATHS Prostate cancer generally occurs later in life and has a higher survival rate than many other cancers. Brain cancer tends to strike at an earlier age and has a low survival rate. Research funding at the National Cancer Institute doesn’t necessarily correlate with a cancer’s impact. Lung cancer, which yearly robs Americans of more than 2 million years of life, receives less research funding than does prostate cancer, which is much less devastating to the population. Breast cancer receives about twice as much funding as any other cancer, even though in terms of years of life lost, it has only a third of the impact of lung cancer. A 2012 study in the journal BMC Public Health surmises that “the relatively high level of funding for breast cancer is due to the organized efforts of women’s groups and charitable organizations to raise awareness and concern about the burden caused by this cancer.” Since 2010, NCI money allocated for research on lung cancer and melanoma has increased slightly, while funds for breast, prostate and colorectal cancer research have ebbed. Research funding at the National Cancer Institute doesn’t necessarily correlate with a cancer’s impact. Lung cancer, which yearly robs Americans of more than 2 million years of life, receives less research funding than does prostate cancer, which is much less devastating to the population. Breast cancer receives about twice as much funding as any other cancer, even though in terms of years of life lost, it has only a third of the impact of lung cancer. A 2012 study in the journal BMC Public Health surmises that “the relatively high level of funding for breast cancer is due to the organized efforts of women’s groups and charitable organizations to raise awareness and concern about the burden caused by this cancer.” Since 2010, NCI money allocated for research on lung cancer and melanoma has increased slightly, while funds for breast, prostate and colorectal cancer research have ebbed. Money for research

SOURCE: National Cancer Institute; BMC Public Health | *The age at which half of those sampled were older and half were younger.