Evidence in Harvard admissions trial

These documents were submitted as evidence in federal court in Boston for a trial involving Harvard University. A plaintiff contends that the university discriminates against Asian Americans in admissions. Harvard denies the allegation. The documents here include correspondence between Harvard and the Education Department's Office for Civil Rights, as well as internal guidance from Harvard for alumni interviewers and application readers. Also included are letters between Harvard and a parent whose child applied for admission and was denied.

HARVARD UNIVERSITY
Office of the General Counsel
Heather M. Q~ay

Holyoke Center, Suite 980
1350 Massachusetts A~cnac
Cambridge, Massact=usetts 02138-3834

heather_q,aay@hat va~d.edu

t.617.495.1434
APS617.495.5079

February 2, 2012

Ms. Nicole Merhill
Office for Civil Rights
U.S. Department of Education, Region I
5 Post Office Square
8th Floor
Boston, MA 02109
............ ......

R~:

: cd~plair:{N6:Oi:fi~207g ....

..........

::

:

.....................................................

Dear Ms. Merhill:
Thank you again for your courtesy in allowing me extra time to prepare the response of
President and Fellows of Harvard College ("Harvard") to the above-referenced
complaint.
Redacted:
letter dated January 11, 2012, the Complainants allege that
pllfSpl
Harvard denied thcir son admission to Harvard College on the basis of his national origin.
Specifically, they allege that Harvard set a limit on the number of Asian American
students admitted to the University and applied a higher standard to their sonas
ion than it did to applications submitted by White Americans. Although[~
letter does not name the Complainants, they have identified themselves to
Harvard in a separate letter to Willimn R. Fitzsimmons, Dean of Admissions and
Financial Aid for Harvard College, alerting him that their complaint to OCR was
accepted. This letter, dated January 13, 2012, is the latest in a series of letters between
the Complainants and Harvard, all of which are attached as part of this submission. Thus,
because the Complainants, who are the parents
have made
their identity known to Harvard~ this response will in part address specifically the context
and reasons for Harvardas decision O1~
PlIISPl
"
t application. As the
following narrative and attached materials amply demonslrate, Harvard did not
discriminate against[
~.~sp~
[in any way.
A ccoralng
.. to[
~ I

~

o11

o,,,ap,

United States District Court
District of Massachusetts

HARVO0018452

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

DX 25
Case No.

1:14-cv-14176 (ADB)

Date Entered.
By
A-

DX025.0001

Deputy Clerk

Ms. Nicole Merhill
February 2, 2012
Page 2

As has been explained to the Complainants, admission to Harvard College is highly
competitive, in 2010-2011, the College received almost 35,000 applications for the
roughly 1660 possible places for newly entering freshmen.~ Just over six percent of the
applicants were admitted. (Because some students choose not to attend the College, the
number of admitted students is somewhat larger than the number of spots available.)
In no way did Harvard subject[
t~ecla~;tea:Pll~SPl
]to different treatment in the
admissions process on the basis of national origin, as the complaint alleges. As you
kaaow, OCR has in the past conducted an extensive compliance review of Harvard
Collegeas admission process, particularly with respect to Asian American applicants
(OCR Compliance Review 01-88-6009). As OCR reported to Harvard at the end of that
review: "We found no evidence of the existence or use of quotas, nor did we find that
Asian Americans were treated differently than white applicants in the hnplementation of
the admissions process." See October 4, 1990 letter from Thomas J. Hibino to Derek
Bok, enc!osed as Attachment A. The int~rmation that OCR gathered during the course of
that compliance review (and in:subsequent cases) regarding Harvard Collegeas criteria for
admission, its use of race as a factor in admissions decisions, and its general policies and
pF~cedures for selecting students for admission t~i~s undergraduate program is still
acctuate today. The 0niy diffci~nce, ~S ~t~d ~b~Ve, i~ in ~he d~amatically increased
numbers of applicants, which has made the competition for places in each undergraduate
class even more fierce.
The Office of Admissions estimates that approximately 85% of its applicants are
academically qualified for adrnission - that is, 85% of those who apply would likely be
able to handle tt~e academic wt~rk. See the Office of Admissions 2011-2012 Interviewer
Handbook, enclosed as Attactmaent B, page 10. But given that the College can only
admit approximately 6% of its applicants, it is clear that academic qualifications are
necessary but not sufficient to obtain an offer of admission. Like other highly
competitive colleges and universities, Harvard admits only those applicants who present
truly exceptional records of academic, extracurricular, and personal accomplishrnents.
Harvard consideredI
p.~sp~
~pplication in accordance with its standard
admissions process. While his application demonstrated that he is an intelligent and wellrounded young man, ultimately the College determined that other cmadidates presented
stronger qualifications for admission. In short, the College felt that his application, while
within the pool of applicants who met the fundamental requirements, ultimately did not
display any particular areas of excellence that set him apart from the many thousands of
other qualified applicants.
I have responded separately belo~v to the individual items listed in the Data Request
attached to[ ~""~":plu~p~ ] letter.

When returnh~g students are included, the freshman class size is approximately 1685.

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018453

DX025.0002

Ms. Nicole Merhill
Februmay 2, 2012
Page 3

1.

The name, title, business address, email address and telephone number (including
fax number) of" (a) The University:~ contact pei~on for ~his complaint; and (b) The
person authorized to resolve this complaint.

Please consider me the Universityas contact person for this complaint. My
contact information is as follows:
Heather Quay
University Attorney
Harvard University
Office of the General Counsel
1350 Massachusetts Avenue, Suite 980
Cambridge, MA 02138
Email: ~eather_~tuay@harvard.edu
Telephone: (617) 495-1280
Fax: (617) 495-5079
The person authorized to resolve this complaint is
William R. Fitzsimmons
Harvard College
Dean ef Admissions and Financial Aid
86 Brattle Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
Email: wrf@fas.harvard.edu Telephone: (617) 495-1551
Fax: (617) 495-8321

2. A complete description of the Universityas admissions policies and procedures for
applicants to the Universityas class of 2015.
The halhnark of Harvard Collegeas admissions process is that it is highly individualized,
flexible, and holistic. Members of the Admissions Colmnittee carefully review each
application, giving serious consideration both to the studentas potential to achieve
academic excellence and to contribute to a diverse educational environment. As the
Office of Admissions website advises potential applicants: "There is no fbrmula for
gaining admission to Harvard. Students with vastly different credentials come tiaom
thousands of secondary schools across the country and around the world. Wha~ unifies
our students are the talents they bring to tlarvard and the passion to explore its vast
resomces." http://www.admissions.college.harvard.edu/applyiindex.html

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018454

DX025.0003

Ms. Nicole Merhi!l
Februaxy 2, 2012
Page 4

In a section entitled "What We Seek," the website continues:
Applicants can distinguish themselves for admission in a number of ways.
Some show mmsual academic promise through experience or
achievements in study or research. Many are "well rounded" and have
contributed in various ways to the lives of their schools or communities.
Others are "well lopsided" with demonstrated excellence in a particular
endeavor--academic, extracurricular or otherwise. Still others bring
perspectives tbrmed by unusual personal circumstances or experiences.
Academic accomplishment in high school is important, but we also seek
people with enthusiasm, creativity and strength of character.
Most admitted students rank in the top 10-15 percent of their graduating
classes, having taken the most rigorous secondary school curriculum
available to them.
http://wvcw, admissions.college.harvard.edu/applviindex.html
Further information about the Collegeas application process, as well as a set of detailed
"Frequently Asked Questions" for high school students considering Harvard can also be
found on the Office of Admissions website. Among other things, these materials reiterate
in a nuanber of ways both the holistic nature of the application review and the fact that the
Admissions Committee does not use quotas of any kind.
http://xv-ww, admissions.college.harvard.eduiindex.html
bttp://www, admissions.college..harvard.edu/appl,~/t~aq.html
Notably, the internal guidance documents created by the Office of Admissions for its
committee members and others who participate in the admissions process, such as alumni
interviewers, me entirely cons~stcnt with the materials it makes publicly available. I have
attached the following for your review:
The Harvard College Office ofAdmissions 2011-2012 Interviewer Handbook
(Attacl~nent B);
The Harvard College Office ofAdmissions 2011-2012 Schools Committee
Chairperson Handbook (Attachment C);
The 2011-2012 Standing Committee on Admissions cmd Financial Aid in
Harvard College Information Sheet (Attachment D); and
Reading Pro cedures, Class of2016 (Attachment E).~-

~ I have provided the current iteration of this document, which is virtually identical to the previous yearsa
version.

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018455

DX025.0004

Ms. Nicole MerhiI1
February 2, 2012
Page 5

The 2011-2012 Interviewer Handbook, enclosed as Attachment B, has a section entitled
"Admissions Standards," a large portion of which is devoted to an explanation of the
Collegeas "Search for aDistinguishing Excellencesa" - a narrative description of the very
individualized approach Admissions Committee members take as they "scrutinize"
applications not just for indications of academic excellence, but in an attempt to discern
applicantsa "intellectual imagination, strength of character and.., ability to exercise good
judgment." Given the extraordinary strength of the pool, the salient question posed by
the Committee in considering an individual candidate is: "What makes him or her
distinctive?" The Committee has identified a number of broad factors, or "distinguishing
excellences" that, when considering a group already winnowed to those with a "high
level of merit," might help to positively "tip" a candidate. These are: (1) outstanding and
unusual intellectual ability; (2) unusually appealing personal qualities; (3) outstanding
capacity for leadership; (4) creative ability; (5) athletic ability; (6) Harvard and Radcliffe
parentage; and (7) geographic, ethnic and economic factors. With respect to the last
factor, the Committee quotes former Harvard President Neil Rudenstine, who described
diversity as essential to the life of m~ academic community: "It is the substance from
which much human learning, understanding, and wisdom derive. It offers one of the
:~ ~ost powerful ways of creating!he i_nte!!~m_al energy and robus~n~s~ fl~N l~a~ to greg~r
knowledge, as Well as the t0i~fan4e ~nd ~ai ~;p~ct ~!~ a~e So es~Ni~i ~6 the .......
mah~tenanee of our civil society." Finally, the Committee notes that it ~nnst proceed with
"care, discretion and humility" in making these admittedly subjective judgments,
appreciating that "no one can predict with certainty what an individual will accomplish
during college or beyond." See Attachment B, pages 9-11.
Near,tea:
Harvard considered [
]application in accordance with its standard
~us~
admissions process, in which each applicantas folder receives extensive individual
evaluation. The ftrst reader is generally an "area" achnissions officer, who is a staff
member assigned to a particular geographic area of the country. In some cases,
applications also may be sent to a second reader for further assessment.
The readers rate applicants on a scale of one to tbur (with one being the highest and four
the lowest) in four categories: academic achievement, extracurricular activities, athletics,
and personal qualities. There are no numerical equivalents or formulas in the rating
system. The academic rating, for example, is derived fiaonr a subjective assessment of a
nmnber of factors, including test scores, class rank, teacher recommendations,
responses to questions on the application. An applicant with perfect 800 SAT scores
could be rated as a one, ~wo or even a three academically based on teacher reports and
other academic information. The reader also gives each applicant a preliminary overall
rating (POR) that reflects the readeras judgment as to the applicantas likelihood of
admission based on the applicantas other ratings mad the readeras sense of the relative
strength of the application.

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018456

DX025.0005

Ms. Nicole Merhill
Febmm7 2, 2012
Page 6

After folders have been read, they are considered by a subcommittee. The
subcommittees generally consist of four to eight people, including area admissions
officers, and, as Chair, a senior member of the admissions office staff. Subcommittees
are formed around geographical areas (called "dockets") so that stall" members come to
know the schools, guidance counselors, and special characteristics of the region. At the
subcommittee meeting, all members of the subcommittee have a summa1T of the readersa
evaluations, while the first reader has the entire folder present for reference as needed.
The subcommittee makes a recommendation, xvhich is then considered at a full meeting
of the Admissions Committee. The Admissions Committee, which consists of 38 people,
including all admissions officers and other high level administrators of the College,3
reviews all subcommittee recommendations and votes on final outcomes.
In accordance with these procedures,[
i.~etlact~,tl:musm
}pplication was read
carefully by the admissions officer responsible for his area. The subcommittee then
considered it along with the applications of other candidates in the "C Docket," which
includes southern California (specifically the @eater Los Angeles area), Hawaii, and
Guam and other U.S. possessions. athe final decision not to admitl
~ t~e_~ by flae ~!~ ~0N~ssions Committee by the standard majority vote process.

Statistical #~formation regarding the number of non-minority, Indian American
and Asian American applicants, from each group, that appliedJbr admission to the
Universityas class of 2015, and the respective number of applicants from each
group that was admitted or waitlisted.
Attached are a nmnber of spreadsheets that provide the information you have requested,
as described and summarized below:
Enclosed as Attaclunem F is a chart labeled :aClass of 2015 - Overall" that
provides the applicant data that you have requested. Please note that this chart
provides statistical information only for those applicants who chose to selfidentify as Asian Americans (both as a whole and according to the specific
designations provided by the applicants) and *br those who chose to self-identify
as White Americans. It does not include statistical information tbr any other
demographic group. As noted earlier, the overall admit rate is 6.3%.
Enclosed as Attaclmmnt O is a chart labeled "Class of 2015 - C Docket" that
provides the applicant data that you have requested for the docket in which ff~
Faculty committee, fl~e Standing Committee on Admissions and Financial Aid tbr Harvard College,
meets several times a year to discnss broad topics relating to Admissions policy. In addition, these lZaculty
members may be asked to serve as expert readers when a particular applicant has expressed an interest that
relates to their academic discipline. If they wish, they may attend and vote at subcommittee or full
committee meetings, but in practice do so only rarely.
3A

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018457

DX025.0006

Ms. Nicole Merhill
February 2, 2012
Page 7

I

eeaactea:p~ts~,~
I application initially was considered. Again, this chart provides
statistical information only for applicants who chose to self-identify as Asian
Americans and White Americans, and not for any other demographic group.
Although Harvard does not impose any kind of quotas - either by docket or any
other measure - it nonetheless may be useful for you to consider the allegation
that has been made within the general context of the relevant docket
subcommitteeas work, given tha~
~,~,,o~;~u~
]parents claim that his
application was considered less favorably than those submitted by White
American applicants. Of particular note is the fact that the overall admit rate for
this group is 5.6%, which is equal to the admit rate for candidates who sellaidentify as Asian American (also 5.6%), and higher than the admit rate for
candidates who self-identify as White American (5.1%).

Enclosed as Attaclmaent H is a chart labeled "Class of 2015 - NLNA Overall."
Again limited as described above to data for self-identified Asian Americans and
White Americans, this chart shows the applicant numbers mad admissions rates for
"Non Legacy/Non-Athlete" candidates - in other words, for those applicants who
~-would not be-eligible for ~ ~atip~a eithe~ because one oAPSthe~ parents~went t0~:~ .......................................
Harvard or Radcliffe or because of their exceptional athletic ability. These data
show that, consistent with OCRas previous findings about Harvardas adrnissions
practices, once applicant data is limited to "Non Legacy/Non-Athlete" candidates,
the admit rates between Asian Americans and White Americans are thr closer.
Further, as you know, at the conclusion of its prior compliance review, OCR
specifically found that a~the reasons or goals provided by Harvaxd for giving
preferences to children of almnni and recruited athletes are legitimate institutional
goals, and not a pretext for discrimination against Asian Americans." See
October 4, 1990 OCR letter, enclosed as Attachment A. For the "NLNA" group,
the overall admit rate is 5.4%.
Enclosed as Attachment I is a chart labeled "Class of 2015 -NLNA C Docket."
These data show that the overall admit rate for the "Non Legacy/Non-Athlete"
applicants in the C Docket is 5.1%, lower than the admit rate f~r candidates in
that group who self-identify as Asian American (5.3%), and higher than the admit
rate for candidates in that group who self-identify as White American (4.1%).

4o

The names and titles of all individuals involved in the class of 201~ admissions
~e~cte~:
vrocess re~a~ding applicants who attended
p~llsp~
I
PlIISPI
[ Pacific Palisades, California 90272~ during the 2010-2011 school
year. For each individual identified, please also provide: (a) Tl~e nnmber ofyears
each individual has been involved in the admissions process; (b) A description of
the role each individual has in the admissions process (e.g., reader~ subcommittee

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018458

DX025.0007

Ms. Nicole Merhill
Februmay 2, 2012
Page 8

member, full committee member, etc.); (c) The credentials of each member; and (d)
The individualas race, color and nationai origin,

Enclosed as Attachment J is a chart providing the information about the Admissions
Committee that you have requested. The initial reader for all applications from the
~e.ac~ea:p,,,sp,
Iwas Danielle Early. In addition to Ms. Early, the
members of the subcommittee with responsibility tbr the C Docket were: Precious
Eboigbe, Nathalie Oalindo, Lucerito Ortiz, Elizabeth Pabst, and Sarah Donahue (Chair).
As noted above, the full Admissions Committee reviews and votes on all subcommittee
recommendations.

5. A copy of the complete application ~qles [or all applicants to the Universityas class of
Neo~ctea:
aPiitsPi
2015 who attende~
]during the 2010-2011 school
year.
As we have discussed, Harvard will make all necessary arrangements for you to review
the files you have requested ata.time~andplace that !s_c0nvenient:for.you.:~Wewill not_:
provide copies of these files, which are highly personal to the applicants, and in which
the applicants have a strong expectation of privacy, in light of our concern that these files
might be requested subsequently under the Freedom of Information Act.

............. .......

However, because the Complainants allege that Harvard engaged in unla~vful
discrimination in deciding not to extend an offer of admission toI
u~,~,t~,]":
Ia
more full discussion of the way in which the Admissions Committee made that
determination is appropriate. In short, as stated above, Harvard denied~
I application because, viewed as a whole, it did not exhibit areas of
excellence distinctive enough to set him apart from the many thousands of students who
applied.
As Dean Fitzsimmons explained tol
p,,,s~,
I ~ather last July, approximately
48 percent of the 2010-2011 applicant pool presented SAT I scores totaling 1400 or
higher. Nearly 4,175 scored a perfect 800 on the SAT Mathematics test and over 3,050
recorded an 800 Verbal SAT. As has been the case for many years, the number of
applicants who were valedictorians of their high schools (3,598) was more than twice the
number of places in the frestunan class. Fm-ther, 52% of the applicant pool was in the top
ten percent of their respective high school classes.
~eoa~teO:p.~sp~
I file was read and evaluated by Danielle Early, Admissions Officer
and Directorof Internet Conmmmcatlons.a
" "
Ms. Early, who served on the Achnissions
Committee for five years, was responsible for the initial evaluation of applicants from
A-
~eoac~eo:
.
,~
,
.
~geographm axed, the C Docket, which includes southern
~~SPI
CaliIbrnia ~ally the Greamr Los Angeles area), Hawaii, and Guam and other U.S.

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa

HARVO0018459

EYES ONLY

DX025.0008

Ms. Nicole Merhill
February 2, 2012
Page 9

possessions. As described above, readers rate applicants on a scale of one to ~bur (with
one being the hlghest and four the lowest) in four categories: academic achievement,
extracurricular activities, athletics, and personal qualities.4 Ms. Early recognized--ff~
Rel:tacted:
. ......
~,
strong acaeem~c record, giving hml a rating of 2 an that category.
PII/SPI
lilis rating indicates "Magna potential: F,xcellent student with superb grades and mid- to
high-700 scores." See Attachment E, at page 5 for Harvardas coding guidelines. The
median academic rating for admitted students in his applicant pool also was "2." See
"Class of 2015 -Admits, Median Ratings," enclosed as Attachment K.
However, the Admissions Committee also looks for candidates who have distinguished
themselves from. the many other academically talented~,~,:candidates by demonstrating.
A-
.
excellence outside of the classroom. AlthoughI
]was ~nvolved an a
P,,/sP,
number of extracurricular activities and played a sport, his accomplishments did not rise
to the level of excellence displayed by other cmldidates. In each of the remaining three
tegones, I
p~sp~ "
I only received a ratln~, of ~, which translates to: "Solid
participation but withom special distinction" (extracunaicular activities); "Active
participation" (athletics); and "Generally positive" (personal qualities). See Attachment
E, at page 6. In contrast, the median extracurricular, athletic, and personal ratings for
admitted students were "2", "3", and "2" respectively. See Attactmaent K. A rating of
"2" in extracurricular activities is defined as "Strong secondary school contribution in
one or more areas such as class president, newspaper editor, etc. Local or regional
"
recognition; m ajor
" accomphstnnent(s).
" A rating of "2" in personal qualities is defined as
"Very strong." See Attacbanent E, at page 6.
Further, while [
~"~r~":~,tsp~
j letters of recommendation were positive, they were
not notably more positive than those of many other applicants. His teacher
recommendations were coded as "2" and "3+" and his guidance counselor suppo~ was
coded as "2-." A rating of"2" translates to: "Very sfaong support. aOne of the besta or
athe best this year," while a rating of"3" translates to "Above average positive support."
See Attaclgnent E, at page 6. The median ratings for admitted students were "2," "2" and
"2." See Attachment K. [
pll/Spl
[also received an overall rating o~ ,~ from
the alumnus who conducted his personal interview. The interviewer noted: "as strong as
he is across many areas, Iam not sure there is any one thing that gives him a decided edge
among our highly competitive group of applicants."
On balance, after a careful and individualized evaluation and consideration of all of the
information presented by[
~.~s~
[the reader did not feel that he was one of
the candidates who stood out above the rest. On the back of the summary sheet for ~
[

~p],,~;]~:
[Ms. Early noted his academic strengths but commented generally that
she was "not sure what would keep him in the class." Consequently, she gave l~im a
4 The "personal" category takes into account the applicantas letters of reco~mnendafion, essays, interview,
and other personal data.

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018460

DX025.0009

Ms. Nicole Merhill
February 2, 2012
Page 10

preliminary overall rating of"3:," reflecting the opinion that he was a "Solid contender:
An applicant with good credentials and support." In contrast, the median POR for all
admitted applicants in 20l 1 was "2," defined as AdegaStrong credentials but not quite tops."
See Attachment E, at page 5; Attachment K.

6. A copy of the application(s), including all supplemental forms for admission for ti~e
class of 2015. Please also indicate the number ofyears the University has used tlte
particular application(s) and/or forms.

Harvard accepts both the Common Application and the Universal College Application,
and also requires applicants to submit an Application Supplement unique to Harvard. A
copy of the Application to Harvard ColIege for Fall 2011 Entrance is enclosed as
Attaclm~ent L. This includes information for applicants, the Common Application,
Harvardas Application Supplement, and teacher and school report and evaluation forms.

Any otl~er i~formation :~ncludingdocumentatiouthat th~Universi~y believes may be ........
helpful in OCRas understanding of the allegation presented in this complaint.

............

As noted above, the Complainants corresponded with the Office of Admissions
tluaoughout the summer. A copy of this correspondence is enclosed, in chronological
order, as Attachment M.

Conclusion
As you laaow, Harvard College!s general policies and practices on admissions have been
extensively reviewed in the past by OCR, and have been found to meet the requirements
of the law. Every studem is evaluated as an individual and no quotas of any kind - either
to exclude or to include - exist. While a~a overwhelming ntunber of applicants could
handle Harvardas academically rigorous undergraduate program, the Admissions
Committee engages in a flexible and highly individualized review of all applicants,
attempting to select students whose achievements and personal qualities make them most
likely to contribute to and benefit from Harvardas multi-faceted educational environrnent.
In closing, I reiterate that the undergraduate admissions process at Harvard is
extraordinarily competitive and highly selective. In 2010-2011 Harvard was able to offer
admission to only 6.3% of its nearly 35,000 applicants, which necessoxily meant that the
Admissions Conmaittee had to make a series of difficult choices and turn away thousands
of qualified applicants. All things considered, the Admissions Committee determined
_a~[th~*1
~a~t~a:p,~sp~
I application simply was not as compelling as those of other

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018461

DX025.0010

Ms. Nicole Merhill
February 2, 2012
Page 11

candidates who applied. In light of those circumstances, and given the absence of any
evidence of discrimination, the Complainm~tsa charge should be dismissed.
Please do not hesitate to contact me if you have any questions or ~vould like additional
information.

Very truly yours,

Heather M. Quay

William R. Fitzsimmons, Harvard College Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid
Marlyn E. McGrath, Harvard College Director of Admissions

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL

J

ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018462

DX025.0011

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018463

DX025.0012

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
REGION I
JOHN W. McCORMACK POST OFFICE AND COURTHOUSE. ROOM 222
POST OFFICE SQUARE
BOSTON, MASSACHUSEaFF5 02109
October 4, 1990

0 ~FICE FOR
CML RIGHTS

Mr. Derek Bok
President
tlarvard University
Massachusetts Hall
Cambridge, MassacI~usetts 02138
Re: Compliance Review No. 01-88-6009
Dear President Bok:
I am pleased to inform you that the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) has completed its review.of
Harvard Universityas undergraduate admissions program. The purpose of our investigation was to
determine whether Harvard discriminated against Asian American applicants to the Harvard-Radcliffe
undergraduate program, in violation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 42 U.S.C. Section
2000d et seq., and its implementing regulation at 34 C.F.R. Part 100 (Title VI).

OCR has

responsibility for enforcing Title VI, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, or
national origin in programs and activities that receive Federal financial assistance. As a recipient of
Federal financial assistance from the U.S. Department of Education, Harvard is subject to the
provisions of Title VI.
As discussed more fully below, and in the enclosed Statement of Findings, we have concluded that
Harvard gas not violated Title V1 w~th respect to the admission of Asian American applicants to the
undergraduate program. Over the last ten years Asian American applicants have been admitted at
a significantly lower rate than white applicants, however, we gave concluded that this disparity is not
the result of discriminatory policies or procedures. We found no evidence of the existence or use
of quotas, nor did we find that Asian Americans were treated differendy thanawhite applicants in the
implementation of the admissions process. From information provided by Harvard and our file review
and statistical analyses, we determined that the primary cause of the disparity was the preference
given to children of alumni and recruited athletes, which adversely affected Asian Americans.
However, after examining Harvardas reasons for the preferences, we concluded that they were
legitimate and not a pretext for discrimination.

C~nsequently, based on our determination of

compliance, we are ctosing our review as of the date of this letter.

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018464

DX025.0013

Page 2 - Mr. Derek Bok, Compliance Review No. 0!-88-6009

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS
OCR determined that Asian American applicants were admitted at a statistically significant lower rate
than whi~.e applicams in seven out of the last ten years. (OCR reviewed data from the classes of
t983-1992). Over the entire t0 year review period, we found that Asian American applicants were
admitted at a 13.2% rate, while whites were admitted at a 17.4% rate.

OCR compared the

qualifications of Asian American and white applicants to determine whether weaker credentials might
have accounted for the lower Asian American admit rate. As a result of comparing SAT scores,
secondary schooI records, and Admissions staff and alumni ratings of Asian American and white
applicants, we found that Asian American applicants tended to be slightly stronger on academic
criteria, while whites were slightly stronger on non-academic criteria.

Overall, statisticaI analyses

suggested that the two groups were similarly qualified, and consequently disparate admit rates could
not be explained by weaker credentials.
Accordingly, we then looked at whether the disparity was the result of the use of a numerical quota
or ceiling on the number of Asian .American applicants who could be admitted.

We reviewed

documents and il~terviewed ten members of the Harvard Admissions staff, including the Dean of
Admissions, the Director of Admissions, the Minority Recruitment Director, and several senior and
other Admissions Oft]cers. Each of the staff members intelMewed stated that he or she was unaware
of any numerical quotas or goals having been mentioned in the admissions process with respect to
the admission of Asian Amer{cans or members of any other racial or ethnic group.

We also

interviewed Harvard alumni, who served on alumni admissions committees, who similarly stated that
they knew of no numerical goals or quotas u~sed by Harvard with respect to the admission of specific
racial qr ethnic minority groups. Additionally, we inter,dewed former Harvard Admissions staff, and
former students who worked with the Admissions ONce minority programs and were knowledgeable
about admissions practices.. Final.ly, we interviewed numerous Asian American community leaders
who were involved with the issue of Asian American admissions. None of the individuals interviewed
provided any substantive evidence or information to suggest that Harvard imposed numerical
restrictions or quotas limiting the admission of Asian American students.
Further. in analyzing admission trends. OCR found that both thenumber of Asian .Americans
admitted each year. and the percentage of Asian Americans in each freshman class, have increased
every year during the 10 year review period. This pattern of increase continued for the classes of
1993 and 1994. The evidence revealed that Asian Americans have gone from being 5.5% of the class
in 1983 to being 19.7% of the class of 1994. This data does not support a hypothesis that ceilings
are placed on the number of Asian Americans admitted.
OCR next investigated Harvardas e.APStablished admissions policies and procedures to determine whether
Asian Americans were being treated differently than whites in the admissious process. In order ~o

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018465

DX025.0014

Page .3 - Mr. Derek Bok. Compliance Review No. 01-88-6009

evaluate Harvardas policies andprocedures, we obtained and reviewed copies of Harvardas application
for admissions as well as all printed brochures describing the admissions process. We also reviewed
ten years of annual reports on Admissions from the Office of Admissions and Fin~c-ial Aid, as welt
as written descriptions of the admissions policies and process that were submitt~ by the Dean of
Admissions in response to our data request. Additionally, OCR interviewed ten members of the
Admissions staff.
As a result, we found two significant differences in Harvardas policies and procedures in terms of the
treatment of Asian Americans. First, Harvard indicated that it provides an extra reading of Asian
.American applications by an Admissions Officer who is knowledgeable and sensitive to the Asian
American cultures and experiences. Second, Harvard stated that Asian American ethnicity can be
a positive factor in the admissions" process, which might make a difference in a situation where all
other factors are considered equal. We determined that these differences in the treatment of Asian
Americans were consistent with the requirements of Title VI.
OCR then conducted a comprehensive file review to determine whether Asian American and white
applicants were similarly treated in the implementation of established policies and procedures. We
reviewed.400 full applicant files randomly selected from the Classes of 1991 and 1992, including an
equal number of Asian American and white files.

In addition, we reviewed approximately 2,000

Summary Sheets from applicant files, which contained narrative evaluations and numencaI ratings
developed by the readers.

These narratives and ratings summarize the readersa re~,qewas of an

applicant file.
The primary purpose of OCRas review of complete files was to determine whether Asian American
and white applicants with similar qualifications, as demonstrated by the documentation in the
applicantsa files, received similar reader, ratings:

Readers evaluated applicants on the Criteria of

academics, extracurricular actMti~s~ athletics, and personal@alities, and also generated a preliminary
overall rating (POR) reflecting a readeras judgment of applicantsa Likelihood of admission.

In

addition, the review of Summary Sheets provided additional information on the consideration of
ethnicity and other factors in the rating process.
Our review showed that there was the greatest consistency among readersa ratings in the academic
and extracurricular categories. We found that the readers consistently applied the standards found
in the Reading Procedures in these areas. OCR found that there was less consistency among readersa
ratings in the athletic and personal categories. We noted, howe,~er, that while different readersa
ratings varied slightly from other readersa ratings, there was no evidence to suggest that Asian
American applicants and white applicants with similar credentials were gi,AC/en different ratings. With
respect to the POR, Harvard explained that it represent~ a readeras individual judgment of the
strength of a candidate based on al! factors and information available, not orfly the four rating areas.

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018466

DX025.0015

Page 4 - Mr. Derek Bok, Compliance Review No. 01-88-6009

As such, it was di~cult to determine exactly why an applicant received a particular POR.
Nonetheless, it did not appear that Asian American and white applicants were treated differently in
the assignment

of PORs.

We next sought to determine whether the disparity between Asian American and white admission
rates were due to specific criteria er factors considered in the admissions process which might have
a negative impact on Asian American applicants. Through statistical analyses, we concluded that
differences between Asian American and white applicants on ten admissions variables (four reader
ratings, SAT .Math and Verbal, Alumni, Counselor and Teacher ratings, and Class Rank or
Percentage) did not account for the disparity.
We then turned our attention to the preferences Harvard gives to certain groups of applicants in the
admissions process. One of Hmwardas objectives in admissions is to select a diverse group of students
from a wide range of varied backgrounds, including those from different socio-economic, racial and
ethnic groups.

In fact, Harvardas catalogue states that "diversity is the hallmark of the

Harvard/Radcliffe experience." In an effort to achieve its goal of diversity among its student body,
Harvard actively recruits certain group of applicants and gives members of those groups positive
weight or consideration (i.e. "tips~) in the admissions process.

With respect to "tips" in general,

Harvard stated that a "tip" is a preference which may help in some situations where all other factors
are substantially equal for two candidates, but it does not ensure adma2ssion. Harvard also stated that
the admissions process is not based on a mathematical formula, and that the "tips" have no numerical
weight.
There .are three major categories of applicants for whom preferences or "tips" are given: (1)
racial/ethnic minority groups; (2) children of aluwmi (legacies); and (3) recruited athtetes (This
category is distinct from the ;reader "athletic" rating.)

With respect to the racial/ethnic groups

preference, ethnieity is simply one of many considerations in the admissions process which may serve
as a positive factor (but never a negative factor) in reviewing an application. Admissions staff agreed
that Asian American ethnicity was most significant when the applicant demonstrated that he or she
overcame severe obstacles that resulted from his!her ethnicity, or when the applicant was significantly
involved in community organizatic.ns and activities, or if the applicant described the influence and
effect of ethnicity on his or her life through the application essay. There is no formula or specific
criteria for measuring or assessing ethnicity, nor are there instructions for determining how much
weight is given to ethnicity, or where the weight is to be applied in the admissions process.
He,ward has no separate instructions describing how the preference is given to legacies. However,
all legacy applicants are routinely referred to the Dean of Admissions for reading, according to
Harvardas procedures.

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018467

DX025.0016

Page 5 - Mr. Derek Bok, Compliance Review No. 01-88~5009

A recruited (talented) athlete is given special weight or consideration in the admissions process as
follows. Athletes are recruited based upon their athletic accomplishments, talents and their predicted
ability to contribute to the athletic programs at Harvard. i-Iarvardas coaches develop lists of priority
applicants for their respective teams, and these lists are considered or weighed by the Admissions
subcommittees and the full Admissions committee in making their decisions. Other than to suggest
that the higher an applicant was en a coachas priority list, the greater the weight attributed in the
admissions process, Harvard did not have specific guidelines governing the preference given to
recruited athletes. It should be noted that Harvard maintained that all applicants were viewed in light
of what they wouldbring or contribute to the University, and that all ultimately had to demonstrate
that they were qualified for admission to Harvard in the eyes of the full committee.
As a result of the file review and interviews with admissions staff, OCR found a great deal of
evidence suggesting that the preferences or "tips" given to children of alumni and recruited athletes
were significant factors in the admissions process. Conversely, however, OCR also found little or no
evidence of an ethnic "tip" being given to Asian American applicants.

There were n_9_o readersa

comments that suggested that an applicantas Asian ethnicity was a significant or inlportant factor in
deciding to admit the applicant in the same way that being a legacy or a recruited athlete was
instrumental in admitting applicants. While the various "tips" or preferences could not be weighed
or defined precisely, it was clear that the ethnic tip for Asians was significantly less instrumental than
"tips" for legacies and recruited athletes in the determining whether or not to admit an applicant.
Notwithstanding this conclusion, however, the decision to give a "tip" to Asian American applicants
is a matter of institutional policy, and the failure to do so does not constitute a violation of Title VI.
OCR conducted several statistical analyses to determine the effect of these preferences on Asian
American and white admit rates.

Through these analyses, OCR found a strong and distinct

correiation between the preferences or positive weight given to children of alumni and recruited
athletes, and the disparity in Asian American and white admit rates. Based on these anaiyses taken
~ogether with the file review, we have concluded that the disparity in admit rates between Asian
American and white applicants can largely be explained by the preference given to legacies and
recruited athletes, groups that are predorninantly white. When legacies and recruited athletes are
removed from the data, the difference be~veen the Asian American and white admit rates is not
statistically significant in seven of the ten years we reviewed. In two of the remaining three years,
Asian Americans had signi~cantly higher admit rates than white applicants within the restrieteA
sample.
Because the preferences to legacies and recruited athletes resulted in a disparity in the admit rates
between Asian Americans and whites, OCR scrutinized Har~axdas reasons for gMng these
preferences. Han,ard has be~n giving a preference to applicants who are children of alumni and to
talented athletes back to at least the beghmlng of the century. OCR noted that the~e preferences

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018468

DX025.0017

Page 6 - Mr. Derek ]~ok, Compliance Review No. 01-88-6009

were given long before there was a significant number of.Asian American applicants. Also, it is clear
that preferenc~ for legacies and athletes are not unique to Harvard. Consequently, we found no
evidence to suggest that these preferences were instituted to intentionally or del~aberatety limit the
number of Asian Americans at Harvard. Because of the disparate impact that these preferences have
on Asian Americans, however, OCR proceeded to analyze the legitimacy of their use in the
admissions process.

. .

Harvard asserted that its primary reasons for giving a preference to children of alumni were (1) to
encourage alumni volunteer services (such as recruiting prospective students for Harvard), (2) to
encourage alumni financial contributions, and (3) to maintain community relations. In support of
these assertions, Harvard provided information demonstrating that last year, for example, alumni
contributed over 36 million dollars to the Harvard College Fund, much of which is used to provide
financial aid and scholarships to needy students. Additionally, Harvard provided data which indicated
that over 4,000 alumni serve on Schools and Scholarship Committees that participate in recruitment
and admissions activities. Also, Harvard stated that the more than 37,000 dues-paying members of
the Harvard and Radcliffe Clubs contribute to the University in a variety of ways, inc!uding raising
scholarship funds and sponsoring Schools and Scholarship Committees. Harvard maintained that i~s
alumnias time, ener~, money and intellectual resources were essential to maintaining the excellence
of the institution.
With respect to athletic preferences, Harvard explained that its athletic programs, like the academic
programs at Harvard, seek the very best applicants who could contribute to those programs.
Consequently, in the same way that unusually strong math or science scholars would be looked upon
favorably in the admissions process for the contributions they could make to the math or science
programs, talented athletes are looked upon favorably for the contributions they could make to the
athletic programs. Further, Harvard .maintained that a varsiw sports program was an integral part of
American college life, benefiting athletes and other students as well.
OCR reviewed current case law and found no legal authority to suggest that giving preferences to
legacies and recruited athletes was legally impermissible. In fact, the case law suggests that if schools
are to possess a desirable diversity, officials must retain wide discretion, with respect to the manner
of selecting students. The courts have generalIy been reluctant, if not unwilling to dictate what
considerations or methods of selection are to be given priority in college admissions. OCR finds that
the reasons or goals provided by Harvard for giving preferences to children of alumni and recruited
athletes are legitimate institutional goals, and not a pretext for discrimination against Asian
Americans. Additionally, Harvard asserted, and OCR accepts, that there are no alternatives to these
preferences that could effectively accomplish the same legitimate goals.

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018469

DX025.0018

Page 7 - Mr. Derek Bok; Compliance Review No. 01-88-6009

In light of the evidence, and the lack of any legal authority suggesting tha~ such preferences are
impermissible, OCR finds that Harvardas use of preferences for children of alumni and ~ecruited
athletes, while disproportionately benetStti.ng white applicanks, does not violate Title VI of the Civil
Rights Act of 1964 or its implementing regulation at 34 C.F.R. Part 100. Further, as a result of atl
the evidence and information evaluated during this compliance review, it is OCRas overall conclusion
that Harvard did not discriminate against Asian American applicants to its undergraduate program,
in violation of Title VI ot~ the CM1 Rights Act of 1964 or its implementing regulation at 34 C.F.R.
Part 100. Please be advised that this letter is not intended nor should it be construed to cover any
other issues regarding compliance with Title VI not addressed in this letter.
As previously agreed, we are returning the computer data tape and the cop{es of full and edited
Summary Sheet.s that were provided by Harvard for our mutual administrative convenience. Under
the F~:eedom of Information Act, 5 U.S.C. Section 552, it may be necessary to release this document
and related correspondence and records upon request.

In the event that OCR receives such a

request, we will seek to protect, to the extent provided by law, personal information which, if
released, could reasonably be expected to constitute an unwarranted invasion ot~ privacy.
Please express to your staff; particularly Dean William R. Fitzsimmons, my appreciation for the
courtesy and cooperation extended to this office throughout the course of our lengthy investigation.
If you have any questions regardir.g this letter, please feel free to telephone me at (617) 223-9662.
Sincerely,

Tlaomas J. I-Iibino
Acting Regional Director

Enclosures

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018470

DX025.0019

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018471

DX025.0020

Interviewer Handbook

2011 - 2012

Harvard College
OjJkv ofAdmi~ians and >~.inanrial Aid
86 Bratt/e Street
Cambridge, ~1,~ 02138
Reprised Fall (a2011

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018472

DX025.0021

Helen Vendler kindly wrote ~his little essay for us. As ~ former member of the Facui~ Standing
Comn~ttee on Admissions, she wrote it to inspire us, and to help us be particularly alert to those
candidates whose creative sensibilities would be valuable assets to a Harvard class, and would help
them support the culnlral life. of" our communities in dec~des to come. We hope you w~l find it as
enlightening as our Committee does.

Valuing the Creative and Reflective

Anyone who has seen application folders knows the talents of our potential undergradi~ates,
as well as the difficulties overcome by many of them. And anyone who teaches our undergraduates,
as I have done for almos~ thixty yea~s, "~ows the delight of encountering them. Each of us has
responded warmly to many sorts of undergraduates: Iave encountered the top Eagle Scout in the
country, a violinist who is now part of a young professional quartet, a s l udent who backpacked solo
through Tierra del Fuego, and other memorable xvriters, pre-meds, theate~ devotees, Lampoon
contributors on thei~ ~vay to Hollywood, and more. They have come from both private and public
schools and from foreign countries.
We hear from all sides about aqeadership," a:service," "scientific passion," and various other
desirable qualities that bring about change in the wo~ld. Fields receiving the most media attet tion
(economics, biology, psychology, occasionally histow) occupy the public mind more than rid&-perhaps more influentta~ ~n the long mn--m the humanities: poetU, philosophy, foreign languages,
ckama. Auden famously said after seeing the Spanisb Civil War--that "poetry makes nothing
happen." And it doesnat, when the %omething" desixed is the end of hostilities, a government coup,
an airlift, or an election victoA+-T. But those :asomethings" are narrowly conceived. The cuhural
resonance of Greek epic and tragic roles Achilles, Oedipus, Antigone--and the crises of
consciousness they embod}~have been l-eit long after the culture that gave them birth has
disappeared. Gandhias thought has penetrated Far beyond his own country, beyond his own century.
Music makes nothing happen, either, in the world of reportable events (which is the media world);
but the permanence of Beethoven in revolutionary consciousness has not been shaken. We would
a,mow less of Ne~v England without Emily Dickinsonas "seeing New Engiandly," as she put i:. Books
are still considering Lincolnas speeclies--the Getlysburg Address, the Second inaugural~ong after
~he ~VelltS that prompted them vanished inlo the past. Nobody would remember the siege of Troyif
tIomer had not sung it, or Guemiea if Picasso had not painted it. The ttarlem Renaissance xvould
not have occurred as it did without the stimulus oAPS Alain Locke, Harvardas first l~odes Scholar.
Modem philosophy of mind would not exist as it does without the rigors of Wirtgensteinas
Philosophical Investigations, nor wotfld our idea of womenas rights without WoolPs claim for a
~:oom o[-}mr own.
We are eager to harbor the next Homer, the next Ia~ant, or the next Dickinson. There is no
reason why we shouldnat expect such a student to spend his or her university years with us. Emerson
did; Wallace Stevens did; Robert Frost did; Frank OaHara and John AshbeU and Fairfield Porter and
Adrienne Rich did; and had unNersides harbored women in residence when Dickinson came of age,
she *Nght have been glad to be here. She and Woolf could be the writers they were because their
fi~thers had extensive private libraries; women without such resources were deprived of the chance
to be all they could be. It is important to recall that the makers of culture last longer in public
memory than members of Parliament, representatives and senators; they modify the mind of their
century more, in general, than elected officials. They make the reputation of a count~T. ),fiche[angelo
outlasts the Medici and the Popes in our idea of Italy; and, as one French poet said, a~lc buste/Survit
~ la cit~": art oudives the cities that gave it birth.

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018473

DX025.0022

In the f~ture, will the United States be remembered with admiration? Will we be thanked for
our stock market and its investors? For our wars and their consequences? For our depletion of
natural resources? For our failure at criminal rehabilitation? Certainly not. Future cultures will
cert,qin]y be gratc~aul to k18 for mat~y aspc:cts of scim,dSc discovery, and faor our progress (such as it
has been) in more humane laws. We can be proud of those of our graduates who have gone out in
the world as devoted investigators of the natural world, or as just judges, or as ministers to the
marginalized. But science, the laxv, and even ethics are moving fields, constantly sm~assing
themselves. To future generations ou~ medicine will seem prin~itive, our laws backward, even our
ethica1 convictions narrow.
"I ~ried each thing; only some were immortal and free," wrote our graduate John Ashbery.
He decided on the immortal and free things, art and thought, and becmne a notable poet. Most art,
past or present, does not have the stamina to last; but many of our graduates, ]ike the ones
mentioned above, have produced a level of art above the transient. The critical question for Harvard
is not whether we are admitting a large number of future doctors and scientists and lawTers and
businessmen (even future philanthropists): we are. The question is whether we can attract as many as
possible of the future Emersons and Dickinsons. How would ave identify them? What should we ask
them in interviews? How- would we make them want to come to us?
The truth is that many future poets, novelists, and sc~eenwdters are not ]Jkety to be straightA students, either in high school or in college. "ihe arts through which ~hey will discover themseNes
prize creativity, originality, and intensity above academic performance; they value introspection
above extroversion, instght above rote learning. Yet such unusual students may be, in the long run,
the g~aduates of whom ave wilt be most proud. Do we have room for the reflecave imrovert as well
as for the future leader? Will we enjoy the student who manages to do respectably but not brilliantly
in all her subjects but one -but a~ tha~ one surpasses all her companions? Will we welcome eagerly
the person who has in high school been completely uninterested in pubhc serv-ice or sports--but
who may be rite next Wallace Stevens? Can we preach the doctrine of excellence in an art; the
doctrine o~inmllect~ml absorplion in a field o~-sludy; even the doctrine of unsociability; even the
doctrine of indifference to money? (Wittgenstein, who was rich, gave all his money away as a
distraction; Emily Dickinson, who was rich, appears not to have spent money, personally, on
anything except for an occasional dress, and paper and ink.) Can frugality, seem as desirable to our
m~dergraduates as affluence~rovided it is a frugality that nonetheless allows them enough leisure
t~ think a~d write? C~m we preach a doctrine of voc~li~m in lieu of the doctrine of competitiveness
and worldly achievement?
These are crucial questions for Harvard. But there are also other questions we need to ask
oursclvcs: Do wc vakm mostly" students who resemblc us in talent and personali .ty and choice of
interests? Do we remind ourselves to ask, before conversing with a student with artistic or creative
interests, what sort of questions will reveal the nex~ T.S. Eliot? (Do we ever ask, "Who is the poet
you have most enioyed reading?" Eliot would have had an interesting answer to that.) l)o we ask
students who have done we[l in ]English which aspects of the English language or a foreign ianguage
they have enjoyed learning about, or what books they have read that most touched them? Do we ask
students who have won prizes in art whether they ever go to museums? Do we ask m which
medium they have felt themselves freest? ]Do we inquire whether students have artists (writers,
composers, sculptors) in their family? Do we ask an introverted student what issues most occupy his
mind, or suggest something (justice and injustice in her high school) for her to discuss? Will we
believe a recommendation saying, "This student is the most gifted writer I have ever taught," when
the student exhibits, on his transcript, Cas in chemistry and mathematics, and has absolutely no highscho4 record of group activity? Can we see ourseNes admitting such a sutdent (which may entail
not admitting someone else, ~vho may have been a valedictorian)?

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018474

DX025.0023

President Drew Faustas new initiative in the ~rts will make Harvard an immensely attractive
place to students with artistic talent of any sort. It remains for us to identiFj them when the},
apply- -to make sure they can do well enough to gain a degree, yes, but not to expect them to be
welI-rounded, or to become leaders. Some people in the arts do of course become ieaders (they
conduct as well as sing, ur found public-service organizations to increase literacy, or work for the
reinstatement of the arts m schools): But one canat quite picture Baudelaire pursuing public service,
or Mozart spending time perfecting his mathematics. We need to be deeply attracted by the onesided as well as the many-sided. Some day the world will be glad we were hospitable to future artists.
Of course most of them will not end up as Yo-Yo Ma or Adrienne Rich; but they ~vill be the people
who keep the arts alive in our culture. "To have great poets," as Whitman said, "there must be great
audiences ~oo.a~ The matrix of culture will become impoverished if the~e are not enough gifted
artists and thinkers produced: and since universities are the main p~:oducers for all the professions,
they cannot neglect the professions of art and rcflectmn.
And four years at Harvard can certainly nurture an artist as a conservatorya-education cannot.
It remains true that great writers have often been deeply (if eccentrically) learned, that they have
been bilingaal or trilingual, or have had a consuming interest in another art (as Whitman loved vocal
music, as Michelangelo wrote sonnets). At Hai~,-ard, writers and artists will encounter notaonly the
riches of the course catalogue but also numerous others lake themselves; such encounters are a
prerequisim ~or the creation of self-confidence in an art. It is no accident that many of our writers
have come out of our literary magazine the Advocate, where they found a collective home. We need
comparable student homes }br the other arts.
Once we have our potential philosophers, writers, and composers, how will we prepare them
t-or their passage into the wider society? Our excellent students are intensely recruited by business
and finance in the Fall of their ser~ior year--somelimes even eadicr than that, Humanities
organizations (foundations, schools, government bureaus) do not have the resources to tly students
around the ~vorld, or even around the United States, for inter:views, nor do :heir budgets allow
recruiters and their travel expenses. Perhaps money could be found to pay for recruiting trips in the
early (~!1 for representatives of humanities organizations. Perhaps we can find a way to convey to
our juniors that there are places to go other than Wail Streel, and great satisfaction to be found
when they follow their own passions, rather than a passion for a high salary. But if we are to be
believed when we inform them of such opportunities, we need, I think, to mute our praise for
achievement and leadership at least to the extent that we pronounce equal praise for inner
happiness, reflectiveness, and creativity; and we need to make being actively recrm~ed as available to
students of the humauiries as it now is to others.
~,aqqth a larger supply of creative and reflective admittees on campus, fellow-students will
benefit not only from seeing their st3~le of Life and a~tenct~g their exhibits or plays or readings, but
also from thei~ intellectual conversation. America will, in the end, be gratefiil to us for giving her
original philosophers, critics, and a~tists; and we can let the world see ~hat iust as wc prize physicians
and scienuists and lawyers and judges and economists, we also are proud of our future philosophers,
novelists, composers, and critics, who, although they must follow a rather lonely and highly
individual path, are also indispensable contributors to our nationas bistoW and reputation.

Helen Vendler, Artliur Kingsley Porter University Professor

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018475

DX025.0024

Table of Contents
Introduction ........................................................................................................... 6
Recommended Reading and Harvard Websites .............................................................................. 6
Eligibility for Schools Committee Work .......................................................................................... 8
Pomntiai Conflicts of Interest as a Member of a Schools Committee ......................................... 8
Confidentialit3,~ ....................................................................................................................................... 8

1. Admissions Standards ....................................................................................... 9
The Committee on ~-dmissions and Financial Aid ......................................................................... 9
The Search fo~: "Distinguishing ]~;xceilences". ................................................................................ 9
Academic Credentials ........................................................................................................................ 11

2. ltow the Committee Selects a Class ............................................................... 13
Recruiting Pzospective Students ...................................................................................................... 13
The Ccmmon Application or the Universal College Application ............................................... 14
Application Deadlines and Decision Dates .................................................................................... 15
Early Action ........................................................................................................................................ 15
The Committee Process .................................................................................................................... 16
The Importance of Timely Interview Reports ............................................................................... 17
Ivy League Early Evaluation Progra~n ............................................................................................ 18
The Wait List ...................................................................................................................................... 19
Trans fer Applications ........................................................................................................................ 19

ltow Schools Committees Can Recruit Students .......................................... 20
College Fairs ........................................................................................................................................ 21
Acting as Secondm-y School Liaisons ..............................................................................................
Early Recruirnaent .............................................................................................................................. 22
Recruiting to Enhance Harvardas Visibility .................................................................................... 23
Recruiting Athletes ............................................................................................................................. 24
Recruiting Admitted Students .......................................................................................................... 25
Interviewing Applicants ................................................................................. 27
Scheduling ~he interview ................................................................................................................... 27
Conducting the Interview ................................................................................................................. 30
\Vriting the Intexa~iew Report ........................................................................................................... 3,1
Sending Your Reports to Cambridge and to Your Chair ............................................................. 36
Ranking Meetings ............................................................................................................................... 36
Transfer intc~mwmg ........................................................................................................................ 37

5. Sample Interview Reports .............................................................................. 38

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018476

DX025.0025

Introduction

Each ),ear, rnemhers of o~ Schools & Scholarships Committees recruit and evaluate
applicants to Harvard College. In the process, they cultivate critical relationships with pa~ents,
guidance counsdors, other alumni/ae, and the geueral public. As the competition among colleges
for the best students increases, so does our need for your help. We are grateful you have volunteered
to join our efforts. You will likely find the work personally rewarding, intel!ecmally stimulating, and
occasionally p erplexing.
This document ad&esses four subjects: 1) "Admissiot~s Standards" descmbes the structure of
the Admissions and Financial Aid offices. 2) "How the Committee Selects a Class" explains our
critema and procedures for recruiting students, evaluating them, and voting on their adrmssion. 3)
"How Schools Committees Recruit Students" describes recruitment you can do. The most critical
and practical part of this handbook is 4) "Intendewing Applicants," an overview oghow to
schedule and conduct a personal interview and evaluate students in w~itten reports, in
section 5) "Sampte ~ntetwiew Reports," you will find examples of~ctual interview ~epor~s with our
comments describing what was particularly well done and what the intervie~ver could have improved
to make the report more helpful to the Committee.
The Committee has developed these practices over four decades of work with alumni/ac.
Please read this document and consult our website (http:/iwww.adnfissiorzs_college.harvard.edu),
which includes an overview of the College. In addition, the publications and weh sites referred to
below will keep you current on IIarvardas academic, extracurricular, and other resources, The
A&nissions Officeas own site is at www.adr~fissions.college.harvard.edu. As always, feel fiaee to
contact us (617.495.1551) if we can be of further assistance in this important work. Once again,
thank you for all of your help!

Recommended Reading and Harvard Websites
Primary sources
SEAS outlines programs in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (~aw.seas.}mrva~d.edu)
Virtual Tour (5vww,~e,vs.ha~,,q~:d.edu~s~_?&t~_)

vd]i guide you around

and about Harvard Yard.

Admissions Video (]!Z:[21.i~
Electronic newsletters are sent to ali alumni!at intcrvicwers, usually 2 3 times a )-ear.
Freshman Seminar Program (y:ww, f,qs.harva~d.eduis~mina,m~) describes current seminars.
Practice and Performance Office for the Arts (~x~vw.fas.harvard.edt:/~"pand!?), lists the facilities,
programs, and organizations at Harvard in dance, music, theater, and the visual arts.
Accessible Education Office Resources for students with disabilities &v~,*;w ae ~.ias2 a*vard edu?

HARVO0018477

CONFIDENTIAL

DX025.0026

SecondalT sources
These publications, offered by other sources, can also help:
Courses of Instruction (w~x:wa:egi~a::r~r.~s.harvard.e_~A~7~!~::~Ses) is the Faculty of Arts and Sdences
course catalog.
Handbook for Students and Fields of Concentration
(httpj iha,adbook.f~.harvard.AC/dta~ / icb iicb.d~,~ )
describes degree requirements and general regulations.

Religious Life at Harvard features a United Minist:T directory,; call 617.495.5529 or consult
(http:i !chaplains.harvard.edu/)
Harvard University Gazette (http:/!nexvs.harvard.edu/gazette/is published xvee!dy by the
University
Nexvs Office during the academic term and three times over the summer. In addition, an
update of Harratd happenings is sent via e-mai! each weekday to subscribers. Alumni can
register fi~r d~ese e-mail updates on the Gazetteas wcbsite.
Office of Career Services (~*,:3S3Xd~APS5..:APS~bk;3;a,.~Aa*!.:.~:O~!) offers information about jobs and imernships.
Harvard Magazine (~,,~~?<3g,.}.~_;~_t..?:<asLJ.~tz~:,~a~2d~.:~.~!!) sends a]l alumni/ae copies eveU other rnonth.
Harward College Program in General Education
(~_t._t~.:~:w.gen~_~~f~.h_~.~_~._d_.u..~i~.~!~) offers information about the categories
of the new program and the courses offered.
GoCrimson.com provides information about Varsity Division I and recreational athletics on
Harvardas campus.
Samuel Eliot Morisonas Tltree ~ae~t~iie~ olr~nr~rff (1986) is perhaps the best one-volume history
of Harvard.
HemT Rosovskyas ~-I~e l~r~aty: _~._~ ~e2am ~F (1991) offers a primer on college
admissions and the mission of liberal arts college~.

University President Neil Rudetistineas 1993-95 Report, "Diversity and I,earning," surveys Harvardas
practice of and commitment to recruiting distinguished stude*~ls of all backgrounds.

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018478

DX025.0027

Eligibility for Schools Committee Work
Participation in School Committee work is open to alumrfi/ae of Harvard CoLlege and our
graduate schools. Important prerequisites include broad knowledge of the College, enthusiasm for
your experience as a studen~ at Harvard, and sincerity of purpose in worldng with prospective
college students, their families, schools, and the general public.

Potential Confficts of Interest as a Member of a Schools Committee
As a member of you~ local Schools Con~iztee, you become a voluntary--but no 1ess
official~-rcprcsentative of Harvard Unive~:sity. Accordingly, it is critical to avoid circumstances that
nfiglit suggest an appearance of inappropriate or dup[icitous conduct. For example, almnniiae who
offer college counseling smavices for a fee are not allowed to participate in Schools Committee xvork.
Interviewers whose children are planning to apply m Harvard are obligated to refrain from doing
Schools Committee work for a year, or a least ~hrough the full completion of the admissiems cycle.
(Committee members should alert their Schools Committee Chair to this possibility during the
summer befi~re/Jcmir ctfildas senior year of high school.) We shni~arly request that individuals refrain
from inter~dewing for Harvard and another undergradnam ir stivution. In addition, of course, you
should accept all interviewing assigmnents with total objectivity, whLle appi,ving appropriate
sensitivity to persona1, business or other connections to candidates for admissions.
Should you have any quest{ons about a possible breach of good faith about your role as a
volunteer for the Harvard Admissions Office, please contact the Admissions Office to speak with
your staff representative.
Confidentiality
Never discuss what you know" about students w~th anyone, even w~th school officials. (There
is one exception to this rule that can also raise potential problems of confidentiality: holding a
ranking meeting or otherwise sharing information abou~ any candidate within a particular Schools
Committee. See page 34.) Confident{a~ity ~s especially i~portant when working with thc general
public. F~ven well-intentioned comments can reveal--sometimes disastrously---more than was
intended. For instance, a principal or counsdor asking why the Committee denied a student
admission needs only to hear that tlie applicant "was not well supported" to go after teachers.

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018479

DX025.0028

1. Admissions Standards

Harvardas admission officers are not deafing with disembodied abstractions but with thcusands of vetT
real and veU human individuals whose qua[ides are ~ardy scientifically measured and labeied Lmmh:ed.

Wilbur ~, Beader
Dea~ qi Admirdon,c and Fina~wl.alAid
Report to the Prerident, 195~60

The Committee on Admissions and Financial Aid
Tfie Harvard College De,qn of k dmissi{ms and Financial Aid oversees the Admissions
Office, the F~ancid Aid Office, and the Stndent Employment Offige, al! of which are located at 86
Brattle Street, Cambridge, APS~ 02138. The Dean chairs the Standing Cormnittee on Admissions and
Finandal Aid of the Faculty, which includes more than 25 members of the Faculty of Arts and
Sciences (FAS). The Dean and the Standit~g Committee, acting on behalf of FAS, implement
policies on admissions and financiaal aid. Members of the Standing Committee also review cases that
are representat!ve of the entire pool, p~esent strong scholarly c~cedcntials, demonstrate excepnonal
crcativity m the arts, or raise questions of admissions policy. Wor "ldng under the guidelines
established by ~e Standing Committee, the Admissions Committee makes decisions on individual
applicants. al~le Admissions Committee is composed of the Standing Committee of the Faculty and
about 40 members from the three offices the Dean supervises.
"iI~e Financial Aid Office administers financial aid to eligible students who attend ~he
College. Harvard remains need b~ind in the admissions process, at~d ttarvard awards finam ial aid
based strictly on need. That ~s, the Committee makes each admission decision without regard co
whether a student has applied for aid, whether a student qualifies for financial aid, and regardless of
the amoun~ of financial aid for xvhich a student quaEfies_ Harvard awards finandal aid strictly on the
basis of a familyas need; we do not award merit scholarships. Thanks to the strong commitment of
the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and the continuing generosity, of donors, we are committed to
providing the financial aid resources necessary to make the College fulN accessible to students of
promise.

The Search for "Distinguishing Excellencesaa~
Our goa! is to attract the best students to the College. Part of the general pubEc believes
"best" ought to be defined by standardized tests, gradcs, and class rank. It is easy to understand why.
In his 1959-1960 Report to the Presidetal, [ta~ard Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid Wilbur J.
Bender wrote that "[qor a harassed admission officer [such a policy] has great appeal because ~t has

~ T}fis section rcprescnts extensive statis:icai analysis of the Committeeas acdons and ~epresents accnaately the way in
which the Committee approaches each case. Our anaiyses have demonslrated that persona[ att~_aibutes--as represented b7
the alumni/ae inmrview, extracurricular radng, and personal ra~ing--a~e factors in our decision making that are as
significant as academic ability.---as represented by rank in class; zigo~ of high school curriculum; .SAT, ACT, and AP/IB
scores; and teacher and guidance counselor 5ecommendations

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018480

DX025.0029

the merits of apparent simphcity, objectivitT, relalffve administrative cheapness in time and mouey
and wor~y, a clear logical basis and thercfo~:e easy applicability and defaensibility.a~
The Admissions Committee values objective criteria, but holds a more expansive view of
excellence. Test scores and grades indicate studentsa acadengc aptitude and achievement. The
Connnittee also scn~tinizes applications for extracurricular distinction and personal qualities.
Studentsa intellectual imagination, strength of character, and thdr ability to exercise good
judgmem--these ~re odmr, cdtical fkctors in the admissions process, and they are revealed not by
test scores but by studentsa activity outside the classroom, the tes~nony of teachers and guidance
counselors, and by alumni!ae interview reports. Seeaking evidence of dmse three criteria--academic
excellence, extracurricular distinction, and personal qualities--the Committee reads with care all the
components of each applicantas file: the high school transcript, standardized test scores,
extracurricular activities, personal statement, teacher and secondary school recommendations, and
the personal interview report.
Attempts to define and to identify precise elements of character, and ~ detern-~ine ho~v
much weight they should be given in the admissions process, require discretion and judiciousness.
But the Committee believes that the "best" freshman class is more likely to result if we bring
evaluation of character and personality iuto decisions than if ave do not. We believe that a diversitT
of backgrounds, academic interests, extracurricular talents, and career goals among students who kve
and learn together affects the quailw of-educaOon as much as a great facuI~~ or vasl material
APSesource8.

The Committee appreciates the degree to which many admissions decisions hinge on
judgment calls. In 2010-2011, 34,950 applicams competed ~or about 1,685 spots in the entering
class. Perhaps 85 percent of our applicants are academically qualifiedi A significant portion also
presents strong personal and extracurricular credentials. When considering an applicator, dmn, d~e
Commitme asks, "What makcs him or her distinctive?" The Committee identifies certain broad
~actors that generally carry weigh~ in this process. These "distinguishing excellences" might "tip"
into the class an applicant who presents the Committee solid evidence of academic excellence,
extracurricular accompSshment, and strong personal qualities. Tips come into play only at a high
level ot merit; the Comnuttee never g~ves enough of a tip to admit an average candidate ~t the
expense off a first-rate one. These are among the most common "tips" by which applicants,
presenting distinguished academic and extracurricular records, ~mght distinguish themsdves for
a&nission:
Outstanding and unusual intellectual ability. Harvard is likely to admit brilliant students
of sound character who offer substantial evidence ofintdligence at the most elevated level. More
t~an presenIiug ~}~e Committcc -a~ith superior testing and strong academic records in competitive
secondary scliool elassrooms, the applicant admitted primarily for unusual intelligence also presents
compelling evidence of cAPSeativity and originality.
Unusually appealing personal qualities, in certain cases, teacher recommendaoons, the
seconda*T school report, personal statement, and the alumniiae interview report offer consistent
testimony of ;m applicantas unusual effei~mscence, chad.T, maturity, or strength of" character in
addition to academic and extracurricular accomplishment. A residential commnnit~ ,~th strong
empl~asis on extracurricular participation, liar-yard prizes these qualities.
Outstanding capacity fo~ leadership, ttarvard aims to educate individuals to have broad
vision who ~dll be leaders in their chosen fields. Evidence of ability to lead others in positive wa}~
can distinguish an ;~pplicant for admission.
Creative abiliD~. The Harvard Supplement to the Common Application encourages
students a%vqth exceptional talents or interests" to send the Com~rflttee music CDs, compositions,
dance DVDs, slides of artwork, or selected samples of academic ~vork (including crcadve xvriting)
10

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018481

DX025.0030

for APSacuhy evaluation, which can inform admissions decisions. Studentsa axtistic participation and
performance help entich life at ~ tal-vard and beyond.
Athletic ability. The College has a long tradition of athletic excellence -in competition with
our intercollegiate rivals and among our freshman and House communities. Harvard enrolls students
who are among the most active in recreational athletics, and we le~d all undergraduate institutions in
the number oi" NCAA Division I athletic teams (41). Evidence of a candidateas abili~ to contritmle
to one of these teams, :rod of solid pe*sonal qualities and academic abilities, can distinguish a
candidate for admission.
Harvard and Radcliffe parentage. Among a group of similarly distinguished applicants,
the Committee is more likely to admit the sons and daughters of Harvard and Radcliffe alumni/ae
than students without these institutional ties when all other factors are equal. Children ofalumni/ae
generally prove to be highly competitive candidates even without a hneage tip. Their academic
credentials - test scores and grades - are nearly identical to those of the enmring class as a wliote.
Geographic, ethnic, and economic factors. The excellence and diversity, of ou; students
remain sahent attractions for many prospective students. Undergraduates come from every state and
more than 80 foreigm countries. They have attended pubhc, private, and parochial schools; represm~t
all economic, ethnic, and religious backgrour~ds; and possess a wide range of acaden~c interests and
extracurricular talents. "Such diversity is not an end in itself, or a pleasant but dispensable
accessow,"a U mvcrs,ty President NeLl Rudenstine wrote in his 1993-95 Report, "DNersiv,~ and
[,earning." "It is the substance from which much human learning, understanding, and w{sdom
derive. It offers one of the mosl powerful ways of creating the intellectual energy and robustness
that lead to greater knowledge, as walt as the tolerance a*~d mutual respect that are so essential to the
maintenance of our civil society."
These iactors are guidehnes that are neither compret:ensive nor absolute. Some successful
candidates present a number of these qualities in their applications and are, in other ~,ords, well
rounded. Other applicants are successful because they are well lopsided~they demonstrate
exceptional distinction in one of these areas. Yet the Admissions Commtttee denies and offers
ach~=ssion to students who might fit either description.
Our success depends on our abLlity to attract students of different personalities, ; cademic
interests, and extracurricular talents to Harvard. We proceed with care, discretion, and humili7
because we know we a~e working with imperfect infomaation, and that no one can predict with
certdnty what an individual will accomplish during college or beyond. The Commtttee appreciates
the element of subjectiviw involved in assessing a candidateas distinction in any one o{ these
categories and in identit~dng some of the personal qualities we believe these distinctions
demonstrate. And, hy g[v[~g importancc to butanan judgment, by admitting more than just
bets," we are aware our decisions become harder to explain with precision. By developing famJliarity
vdth the adntissions process, you can help us address the publicas concerns and misconceptions
about rccruitxnent and evalnation at Harvard.
Academic Credentials
Applicm~ts often ask about tim role rm~k-in-class and standardized tests play in admissions
decisions. These comments should inform you~: responses.
Rank-in-class. Ra,~k-in-class (or deciles, quintiles, percentages, etc.) is a helpful, nnportaut
gauge of academic achievement. Few successfal candidates rank below the top l0 tO 15 percent of
their high school classes, except in the cases of applicants applying from secondary schools :hat send
significant percentages of their graduates to selective four-year colleges. Reassure applicants that
11

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018482

DX025.0031

they will not be denied a&~ission solely oi1 the basis of a few places in r~mk; the overall pattern of
studentsa academic performance and the quality of their courses are far more importam than their
rank. Even when assessing applicants within a high-ranking range, the Conunitteeas decisions might
be unrelated to an applicantas class standing because of ti~e weight given other factors.
Standardized testing. Harvard requires all applicants to sub~rdt the results of the SAT or
ACT (w~th the enhanced xvriting portion) and the results of mao SAT Subject Tests (previously
known as the SAT Achievement Tests or SAT II exams). Harvard does not have clearly defined,
reqt~red minimum scores, but students admitted to the College represent a ravage of scores from
roughly 600 to 800 on each section of the SAT and on the SAT Subject Tests.
Candidates with scores lower than 600 (or a 27 ACT composite) are less likely to be offered
admission unless they provide compelling evidence of other unusual talents o~ accomplishments. At
the same time, the Com~ttee does not admit hundreds of applicants who have 700~- scores ,and
fine secondary school records because other candidates appeared stronger in other important ways.
Once the Co~rkrnittee determines that an individual is capable of thriving academically at Harvard -a
judgment made considering test scores, grades, and recommenda0ons--we are most interested in
the person behind the scores.
Re-centering of College Board scores. The College Board adjusted the scoring scale of
the SAT and SAT Subject "i ests in April 1995. Before this change, the national averages for the SAT
verbal and math tests were, respectively, 76 and 22 points below the "500 midpoint." The Cotlege
Board believes it is important that this midpoint be the actual mean for all tests, and they cite a small
initial sample of tes>takers in 1941 to explain the previously skewed scale. Scores have thus risen
considerably; a 420 Verbal has become a "m-centered" 500. Please consider this change when you
assess candidates_ Re centering has lowered the floor for an 800 score--on both the SAT and the
SAT Subject Tests. What was a "pre-re-centered" 730 verbal SAT became an g00; a "pre-recentered" 780 math SAT is now 800. Studentsa expectations for admisdon might be raised simply
because of lacge increases in the number of "perfect" scores.

12

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018483

DX025.0032

2. How the Committee Selects a Class

Recruiting Prospective Students
Many people often ask why, given the thousands of applications [ffarvazd receives every year,
we must invest such time, e~-fort, and resources to recruit talented students]" Vigorous recruitment,
however, has been instrumental to our success. Tt has broadened Harvardas appeal to a national and
international base, and enhanced the Collegeas accessibility. As Bender noted in his first Report to
>he President (1951-52),
That the College is engaged [...] it~ a vigorous recruitment program and that there is a large and growing
st~plus of qualified applicants co~f3:unt the Committee on Admission with new problerns o5 fundamental
po]icy. [;or the first time we can, within limits and we have to--consdou sly shape the make-up of ov~t"
student body instead of al!owing natural selection or laissez fairc to determine it.

Active recruim~ent helps sustain the critical opportunity to "consciously shape ~e make--up of our
student body" as colleges compete in;ensely for the best students.
Direct mail. Virt ually all college-bound students ~ake the PSAT by their junior year. High
school jup~iors and seniors also take SATs and the ACT, which survey students about their academic
experiences and interests. With studentsa permission, the College Board and the American College
Testing Company sell colleges tlxis information. Harvard has identified accomplished students vAth
these searches for maW years. We send letters and viewbooks to searched students, and we share
Student Search Lists xx~,th Schools Co*~unittee cbaJzs to craft recraitmcnt plans and to identify
students to invite ~o local presentations. Our research shows that students who qualify for this
search are about ~vxdce as likdy to be admitted as other applicants. Of course, these search hsts do
not include the names of every student who might be admitted to the College.
Joint travel/Exploring College Options. To respond to the increasingly early interest
students express in college admissions, the Admissions Comt~ttec is concentrafng more on spring
recruitment. Many officers recruit applicants through joint ~ravel. A group of five a&nissions
representatives--representing Harvard and four other colleges--travels to five cities in five days,
speaking in the evening with students and parents and in the morning with guidance coamiselors. In
the last severa years, we have traveled with representatNes from Duke, Georgetown, MIT, Stanford,
the Universi~ of Pennsylvania, Princeton, University of Virginia, and Yale, among others. We
euhance outreach through well-planned joint t2:avel, which exposes Harvard to a broader audience
than do individual school visits. Audiences learn about Harvard even if they attend ~he session to
learn about another college. And by cooperating with other colleges, we enhance the costeffectiveness of travel. Through spring and fall trips, we visit 130 cities in all 50 states and some
international territories and reach approximately 55,000 students and parents, as well as 2000 high
school counselors.
2 A little more than 40 years ago, Harvard College received 7,762 appLicafiom and selected an entering class of 1,134
men. The Offices of Admissions at Ha~rcard College and at RadcLiffe College merged in 1975-76, ir~creasing the number
of total spots in the er_teriflg ciass for men and wnmen to 1,600. Applications grew m 13etween 12,000 to 13,000 until
!993-94, when 15,259 students applied to the College. MeanwhBe, students admitted to Harvard and Radcliffe have
mamculated at higLier rates, driving down fl2e raxv number of students the Admissions Corraa~ttee can admit.
x,3~qth RadcLifFe and I-la~vardas historic announcement in [999 d-mr RadcLiffe would mmge with Harvard~and
establish the RadcLiAPSfe [[nstit~tte ~or Advanced Stqldy as an i~tegral part of Harvazd Umavers~-~a--aI1 applicants from tb.e
1999-2000 adn~ssions cycle on, women as well as men, apply to tile fulJ.y coeduca~onal Ha*ava*d College.

13

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018484

DX025.0033

Undergraduate Admissions Council (UAC). The UAC, working closely widl members
of the Admissions Committee, offers extensive personal outreach to prospective stc~dents. About
300 undergraduates volumeer their time to the UAC to coordinate overnight, on campus housing
for visiting high school seniors throughout the academic yea: and during our annual Ap:il Visiting
Program for admitted students. Their efforts can persuade admitted students to matriculate.
Through telephone contact, email outreach, student blogs, and visits to hometown high school.~, the
UAC sddi:esses prospective studentsa concerns and refers them to other appropriate sources.
Undergraduate Minori~ Recruitment Program (UMRP). The Admissions Office
established the UM~RP in 1974 to consolidate individual outre~ h programs to minority students,
and this student organization has been part of our successful student recruitment ever since.
UM~RPas more than 20 undergraduates conduct personal outreach to minoriv students through onc~m~pus hosdng and by extensive telephone, mail, and e-mail contact during the application process
and following the Committeeas decisions. UMRP members also volunteer a week of their own time
to visit high schools and some jnnior high schools across the country with large concentrations of
minority students :n order to encourage all students in these areas to apply to college.
Und~gmduams craft their itineraries through consultation with the appropriate area admissions
of~cer.

Harvard Financial Aid Initiative (tlFAI). EstabLished during the summer of 2004, the
Admissions Office and Financial Aid Office have implemen:ed a coordinated e~-ort to conduct
personal outreach to students ~vho may fal! within the parameters of the new program. Their work
was modeled after the work of the UiavfRP; accordingly, their recruitment strategies are similar to
(and often conducted in concert wilh) those of die UMRP.
Interview~ and information sessions in Agassiz. rhe Admissions Ot-iice runs year round
recruitment in Cambridge. From the first week in~une to Thanksgiving (with a break in early
September as students settle into their high school routines), we offer optional campus intervdexvs to
high school seniors. We add intetwiew reports generated here to applicantsa files, but Cambridge
interwews do not substitute for the alurnni/ae interview. We also offer studentded tours and group
information sessions throughout the year. Open to the public, the information sessions allow
students and ~heir families to ask an admissions officer and current undergraduates questions about
life at Harvard and the admissions process. Please visit our website or call us at 617.495.155] for
additional information, including up-to-date schedules and locations.

The Common Application or the Universal College Application
Harvard adopted tee Common Application in 1994-1995 and
2007-2008. More than 400 colleges and universities use these standardized forms, wlfich we hope
benefit applicants and secondary schools. Applicants can focus more time on their academic,
exl>qcurricular, and personal lives than on filling out multiple applications. Teachers and counselors
can devote more time to writing a single recommendation (and to counseling) and less to xedundant
paperwork. The Common Application is available free online (www.comu~{)~m;~.~,:~,_o~:r,q and our
website); the Universal College Application may be obtained at www.universaicollegeapp.com
addition to the Common Application or the Universal College Application, we require applicants to
complete a short supplement to indicate their interest, and ks depth, in a field of study, career, and
extracurricular activities--and to submit AP and IB results, an optional additional essay, or tapes,
slides, and papers for faculty evaluation.

14

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018485

DX025.0034

Application Deadlines and Decision Dates
Mid-October, 2011
The Admissions Office begins processing applications for Early Actiot~ candidates; interaview
requests sent to School Committee chairs
November 1, 2011
Deadline for all Early Action application materials. Students applying ~or Zgarly Action should
submit scores by the October series, although scores from the November series should reach us in
mine for consideration.
Early December, 2011
We a~gtl be2in our cared e~a/ua#on process for Regular Dea~don candidates at this *ime, read&g applications in the
order in w/~icb ~/.,~y a~ cov~pletea:
We have asked that candidates send a: least thc Common Application or Universal Application as
soon as possible to allow time for them to begh~ the intervie,xdng process in areas where this is
possible. We recognize that students, secondary school leachers, and counselors have many
commitments that may preclude early submission of admission ma~eri21s by this date. Candida:cs
~*rill uot be penalized in any way" ~f materials are submitted before the JanuaU 1 deadline.
January 1, 2012
Fired &adline jbr application matetialy_~r Regular DecMoa app~&ant.r.
Candidates cain complete testing requ~remcnts by using the J,,muary SAT or Februa~ ACT da tes, but
we hope that they will h,qve their testing completed by the December date.
Date Decisions Are Sent
A- Early Action decisiot~s are mailed/e-mailed on December 15, 2011.
A- Regular Action dec~stons are mailedie mailed on March 29, 2012.
A- Common Reply Date, by which applicants in the Early Action and Regular Decision
processes must accept or decline the offer of admission, is May 1, 2012. No deposit is
requircd.

Early Action
Harvard College has restored nonbindiug early action as part of its admissions process and
significantly enhanced its recruiting program to assist talented students from rnodest economic
backgrounds in tmviga~qng the admissions process. Hat-card has also increa~sed its investment in
undergraduate financial aid to more than $160 million. Currentlya, more than 60 percent of Harvard
College studet*ts receive scholarship aid, and the average grant is about $38,000.
In 2007, Harvard eliminated its nonbinding early action program on a trial basis and moved
to a single admissions deadline, announcing at the ~Lme that it would evaluate the impact of the
change after several years.

15

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018486

DX025.0035

a%a~ac piloted the elimination of early action out of concern that college admissions had
become too complex and pressured for all students, and out of particular concern for students at
unde>resourced high schools who might ~:ot be able to access the early adn-assions process," said
Harvard President Drew Faust. ~aOver the past several years, however, interest in early admissions
has increased, as students and families from across the economic spec:rnm seek certainty about
college choices and financing. Our goal hOWlS to remstimte ~m early-action program consistent with
our bedrock commitment to access, afi-ordability, and excellence."
%~,;~e looked careihlly at trends in llata~ard admissions these past years and saw that many
highly talented students, including some of the best-prepared low income and underrcprcsented
minority students, were choosing programs with an early-action option, and therefi)re were n=ssing
out on the opportunity ~o consider Harvard. We have decided that the Col ego and our students will
be best served by restoring an ea*ly option," sad Dean b~ichael J. Sn~th of the Facult37 of Arts and
Sciences.
Harvardas concerns about equity and transparency will continue to guide the stcucturc of its
admission program. It will mammin a nonbinding approach, which maximizes freedom and
flexibility for students. As in the past, students can apply under the single-choice, early-action
program by Nov. i ~md will l~e tu~ti~ed by Dec. 1 5, at which point smdent~ completing fmancial aid
applications will receive notice of their awards_ Regular decision -,viii continue to operate as usual,
,imth applications due on Jan. I and notification on April 1. All students, whelher admitted under
early action or regular decision, ~411 have until May i to decide whether to :,ttend.
To ensure that the return to early action set~es Harvardas commitment to access and
diversity across many dimensions, the ctmnge i~ admissions policy will be accompanied by
enhancements in the Collegeas recruiting program, including a ,row prograrn promoting transparency
in college admissions, greater outreach, and targeted staff visits to schools where few, students apply
early to college; increased involvement of Harvard utadergraduates throughout the year it: thee
major recruitmg efforts - the Harvard Financial Aid Initiative, the Undergraduate Minority
Recruitment Program, and the Undergraduate Adi~,~issions Councilas Return to High School
Program; and enhanced web features providing families with the ability to calculate the likely net
cost of sending a child to Harvard, and perspectives from fitmncial aid students on life at Harvard.
"The comtrfittnent to including first-generation, lowqncome, and historically disadvantaged
minority students in the full spectrum o[" admissions options is a kcy feature of this new early-action
option," said } latarard College Dean Evelynn Hammonds. a%Nae have made significant gains in
recent years in recruiting larger numbers of these students and in supporting them for success once
here. I am very pleased that we a~e able to re-conceNe early action, consistent with these goals, and
t~ \w~rk wid] s{udents bascd on xvhatcvcr tinactablc best meets their needs."
%a~ae continue to be concerned about the pressures on students today, including those
associated with college admission," said Harvard College Dea~ of Admissions and Financial Aid
William R. Fitzsimmons. "In all of our ~vork, ;ve will do eveuthing possible m level the playing field
in admissions and encourage all students to make thoughtful choices about how they can best
contribt~le to socie~."

The Committee Process
The ~Docket." Each member otr the Admissmns Committee represents specific geographic
areas, and so we reiaer to officers as "area ~-epmsentatives." A ~adocketa~--which we also refer to as a
"subcommittee"---is a geographic~*l region, designed to be roughly equivaient to each of the other
dockets in the number of applicants considered there. There are 20 dockets or subcommittees. Each
16

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018487

DX025.0036

office~: sits on at least t~vo dockets to h~form comparisons made among candidates across vast
geographical lines. Each subcommittee varies in size, but generally includes three to six area
representatives, a docket chair (a senior admissions officer), and the docke~as [hcutty readers.
Who reads lblders. The area person reads all the folders front his or her area--a folderas
~Srst read. The ~?rst :cadet records all data, contacts the applicant or his or her school t-or materials
missing from the folder, and comments on the folderas strengths and weaknesses. Reading every
folder from theli" areas enables area persons to present an overview of the rdative strengths
presented by the applicants there. Second and third readers check factual data recorded on the
~eader sheet and, more importantly, tilt-or additional interpretations of the folder. The third reader
records all evalimlions for emry [nto our database. Folders might receive additional evaluations,
whether by other admissions officers or by members of" the Facultay Standing Committee. These
othe~ evaluations offer more commentaU on the strengths of applicants who present special
attributes such as those described in section 2,
Subcommittee meetings. Once folders have been read, subcommittees mee~. The area
person, as advocate for each case he or she has read, summarizes to the subcommittee the strengths
and weaknesses in each component of each candidamas file. Subcommittee members discuss the
case, and then vote on xvhat recommendation to offer the full Committee. The subcommittee
examines the entire docket several times, extensively reviewing decisions--and in many cases
changing them--It ensure standard scrutiny ~br all applicants, whether they are presented ~tst or
last on a docket. After surveying tee docketas breadth of quality, the subcommittee can identify with
greater confidence those applicants who appear strongest. Majorities rule, but the degree of support
expressed [0r candidate~ is always noted both for candidates the suhcomnOttcc will and will not
recommend for admission. By identifying applicants this ~vav--"clear admits," %trong rejects,"
etc.--subcomt~ttees can compare canctidates with sirm[arly assessed applicants on other dockets.
Subcommittees then present and defend their recommendations to the full Cormr,ittee.
While looking at or listening to the summary of any case, any Cotrnnittee ,nember may raise
questions about the proposed decision and request a fui1 review of the case. g,{any candidates are represemed in full Co,ra-nittee. The Committee compares all candidates across all dockets, and
therefore across geog~a>hical lines.
This rigorous c~mpa~ative process strives to t~e deliberate, meticuious, and fair. It is also
labor intensive. But it permits extraordina~ flexibiSty and the possibility of changing decisions
virtually until the day the Adrr~ssions Committee mails them. This is especially important since the
Commil tee is always receiving new information on candidates. Please convey to applicators the dine
and care the Committee takes with each indNidual application.

The Importance of Timely Interview Reports
Your insights are most valuabIe if we have them for subcommittee--a caseas fanrst hearli~g.
We would, of course, love to read inte~iew repo~ as ~ve f~st ,-ead app~cantsa files. But many
students s~l wait to apply ~y tt:e final deadline, ma~ng it vkmally impossible for their ~eports to be
here for a folderas first read. ~ ~Fe, ~se ~e sm4e~ ~ffgem ~e
as~m~. Waiting an extended period before writing the inte~iew report can ~sadvantage the
studenl, as impressions and important details from the conversation can fade as time passes. As
such, a delayed report may gall to accurately capture the student interviewed.

17

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018488

DX025.0037

The committee process works best and most efficiently, then, when we have repot s for
subcommittee. Subcommittees may discuss a single case for half m: hour or even more before voting
on a recotrmaendation to offer the flail Committee. These conversations are more tentative when
critical items are missing whether they are teacher recommendati~>ns or interview reports. And
while the full Committee will take just as much time as the subco,nn~ittees do discussing a single
case, these discussious take mote time the more new information we must add to case representations. Subco::u~fittees begin meeting in November for the Early Action process and for
three- to four-day shifts in late JanusU until the end of FebraaU for the Regular Decision process.
Please consult with your Schools Committee chair about the exact dates of subcommittees
for the area in svhich you will be interviewing. Specific dates for subcommittee meetings depend on
several factors. Since ~,ach staff member sits on at least two subcommittees, we try to ensure staff
members do not have insuperable conflicts. We :~ttempt to make inter*Jew requests as early as
possible, yet we know there will be some requests we make f~)r inte~iews after subcommittees have
met. Occasionallya, applicantsa files co*nplete as late as late-November for Early Action and Februazay
foz Regula~ Decision. This results, most ofran, from unavoidable logistical fiactors. Mail sometimes
arrives late. Occasionally, we are overwhehned with mall to open, materials to en:er into our
database, and reams of paper to file. Nevertheless, we hope you can fulfill each inte,wiew request as
quickly as possible so that your Cambridge subcommittee has the benef~,t 0fyour inte~ciewersa
personal insights.
The last opportunity, for the vast majority of cases to be heard is during full Committee. The
Admissions Committee must have all inter-levy reports in hand for full Comxnittee. As you know
from reading above, the entire Committee convenes in one ~-oom to readew all the contenders for
admission. Many candidates are re-presented in full Committee, which again may consider a single
case for a half hour or more. Daull Contrmttee generaa.ly meets during the first week o~-December for
Early Acdon c~mdidates and from the end of the iirst week of March to the end of the third week of
March for Regular Decision candidates.
We are grateful that you do all you can to send us interview reports as early as possible.
Clearly, it is vital that ~ve have all intmaviexv reports by the full Committee stage. We hope this oudiv.c
helps you understand that it is critical to complete your interview and report as soon as p~3ssible~
ideally within t~vo ~veeks of receiving, the assignment from your Schools Committee chair.

Ivy Eeague Early Evaluation Program
As detertmned by each institution, admissions offices may advise applicams bei\)~c the
common notification date, in wrimag, of the probabilitT of admission (e.g. likely, possible, unl kely).
If the student is a recruited smdent~athlete, snch notifications may only be made from October i
through March 15, per Ivy League regulations_
Institutions may issue official "probabi]Jstic" communications only iu w~iti~g, from the
office of admassion. Such letters will have the effect of letters of admission, to be cot~fi~med on the
common notiEcation date, subjec~ to revocation only on the same terms as letters of admission.
(Such communications given by coaches, whether oa;ally or in writing, do not constitute binding
institutional commitments.) An applicant who .receives one or more such written communications
and who has made a decision to matriculate at one institution is encouraged (but not required) to
notify all other institutions, and to withdraw all other applications, as promptly as possiba.e.
Such early evaluations are oJ_aten precipitated by pressure on student-athletes from other
institutions requiring an early commitment. In some instances, students are given vetT little time to

18

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018489

DX025.0038

respond to these offers. Such candida~.es bring exceilences of all kinds in addition to athletics, and
the Admissions Committee can vote to notify" them that they are likely to be admitted - rather than
lose them to other insgtutions. Alum:~i/ac Schools and Scholarship Chairs will be informed about
such candidates by the sla~Tarea person and ~11 be requested to intervievv them if time allows.

The Wait List
The Comn~ttee places a number of accomplished applicants on the wait list each year. The
wait List includes the strongest applicants whom the Con~nitree was not able to admit but might still
"a~ish to consider for admission if spots in the entering class open later. Wait-listed students should
make definite plans to attend a college to which they h~ve been admitted, since the number of
students the Committee has been able to admit from the wait list varies from year to year. In some
years, we have admitted no one from the xvait list; in others, we have admitted more than 100
candidates from the xvait list.
Admitted students have until May 1 to accept or forfeit their spots in the entering class.
Should fewer than 1,680 students accept the Committeeas of[er of admission by the May I deadline,
the Committee may then select students who have decided to remain on the wait list to ~a~i1 these
spots. The wait list is not ranked. Wc mcet some time after May 1 to select students from the wait
list through a rigorous comparative process very similar to the full committee meetings described
above.

Transfer Applications
After a two year suspension, the transfer admissions program was reinstated during the
2010-2011 admissions cycle, just under 1500 students applied for 12 transfer spaces. Students
interested in applying during the 2011-2012 cycle should check Harvardas website or call the transfer
office (617.495.5309) in the fall to verify the status of transfer admissions for this academic year.
The application deadline for the transAPSer process is March 1, 2012, xv4th notification byJnne ~.
In the transfer process, Harvard considers applications in the spring from students who wish
to transfer to Harvard after con:pleting at least one year (and not more than two) of full time study
at another college or university. The Committee selects transfer applicants through a rigorous
comparative pzocess and on the basis of their record o~-academic achievement, the strength of
recommendations they receive ~rom college faculty members, and their overall promise. Only the
vcW strongest transfer candidates are selected for alumni interviexvs; you will be contacted directly
by your comnmttee chakperson should we need your hdp interviewing a candidate for transfer
admissions.

19

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018490

DX025.0039

3. How Schools Committees Can Recruit Students
Admissions involves %alesmanship," politics in the broad sense of the wo~d, humata and i,astimttonal
xelations}~ps. It is a mattcx of xvho wo*ks for you and how they work, of whom you select and whom you
reicct, of the public image or images of Harvard, which are affected by everything you do ~: dona~ do.
Witbar J. Be~?der
Deara ofAdmi.<;ia;~s a.,~d JVi~a~;cialAid
l"AC/port to the Prodded*t, !959-60

Through your recruitment efforts, you add an indispensable human dimension to what can
seem an impersonal process. You also can combat myths about the College, its mission, and its
students--myths that can dissuade talented students from applying. This human dimension--and
the simple but Lmpottant fact tha: you live near the candidates you interview--has become even
more important g,yen that we no longer have the financial resources tc~ make a second visit to ~nost
areas beyond Joint Travd.
Schools Comn~ttee members recruit students as well as inzerview them--but there is an
important distinction between the two. When recruiting, alumni/ae should introduce students to
~nd inform them about the College and the admissions process. They should not act m the capaciey
of interviewers, who inform applicants about the College and evalu,qte them for a&~ssion.
Recruitment efforts should c.ot be performed~or perceived to be performed~as a p~eiiminary
screening of prospective or actual applicants. Nevertheless, ak,mniiae should use the information
presented in section 2 to inform their advice to snadcnts.
In most settings in which you recruit students--the college fair or a sc[~ool visit, for
instance-.there is 1: ttle you wilt know abo~at individual students, except that they are interested in
learning more aloout Harvard. AC this introductory, stage, then, the task is essentially to present facts
about opportunities at the College and to dispel misconceptions students and their families have
about it. The Admissions Committee believes strongly that our staff, student workers, and
alumni/so should never disparage anolher college.
Informal contact occasionally does yield information about an individual that is pertinent to
the adrmssions process. For instance, students sometimes volunteer SAT scores, grade point
averages, and class ranks to enahle you to assess whether they arc "In Harvardas range." No matte~
how experienced a recruiter or interviewer is, do not make any predictions or impressions, positive
or negative, about a studentas chance ofadinission. Admissions tracers often parU this ciuestion
by saDng, honestly, that they cannot estimate a studentas chances until they have xead a compleled
application and can assess the yearas competition. And this analysis can only be accota~plished ~x6tb
full access to all the material in an applicantas file and through the extensive discussions shared atqd
comparisons made through ~he full Corm~aittee process.
When prospective students do ask about their chances of admission, it can be helpful to
describe factually Harvardas selectivity---as well as the selectNity of ozher liberal arts schools--ut~d
the importance of applying to a range of schools. When expressed withou~ unusual emphasis and
with a helpful, cot~siderate tone, this advice can hdp manage better studentsa and their familiesa
expectations in the increasingly competitive world of co]logo admissions.

20

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018491

DX025.0040

College Fairs
We receive hun&eds of notices from secondary schools, educational consortiums,
community organizations, and other colleges soliciting our participation in college fairs. Schools
Committee chairs receive copies of these notices and attempt to staff as many of these local events
as possible with their almnniiae members. College fairs vaW in format and audience. Some are
smorgasbords convening community colleges, techrdcal schools, military academies, state schools of
every stripe, and liberal arts colleges it: order to address every student interested in any sort of postsecondary educalion. Other college fairs h~vite colleges that share many qualities.
College fairs can test yottc endurance (fairs often run for three hours or morn) and versatility.
Attending college flairs, for some families, substitutes for studying dozens of college guidebooks. For
other families, the college fair is an opporttmity to discuss in greater detail with a college
represenmtNe what they have read in guidebooks and heard from friends. In a given evening, you
might be asked eveuthmg from, a~(7here is Ha~vard?" to "~aAC/~hat success do [ ta~w*ard students have
:in medical school admissions?"--and you might be asked these queslions many times over. This
should re emphasize the importance o[ being fitt:~iliar with the Collegeas current resources.
Under the section "Forms/documents" of the alumtai interviewer website, you v~li find
resources for alumni attending college fairs, including a "how-to" guide, a list of new initiatives at
Hat-card, and a college [air materials request form.

Acting as Secondary School Liaisons
Acting as a secondary school liaison may be one of the most valuable ways to identiff and
recrmt talented students and to build positive relationships and good will xvith their families and
school officials. Place a call yourself to the guidance department to introduce yourself and to explain
your role in the Harvard admissions process--or drop a note with information about how people
~an contact you. You should tell guidance and other school officials that you are an alumnusia a
member of ~he loca! Schools Committee, which works closely ~vith the Admissions Committee in
Cambridge. While you should apprise schools of the recruitmen~ work Schools Committees do,
describe explidtly how you wish to work with the school. Be clear that your tnission is to introduce
students to the College and to serve as an inibrmattonal resource. Confirm that the school
understands that your desired role is not one ~f evaluation, assessment, or screening of prospective
applicants. "ihis a~)proach can encottrage school officials to direct stu&nts to you w~thou~ the fear
that contact rmght affect a final admissions decision.
Depending on the secondary schoolas own policies, you might have wide latitude in worldng
~x,qth schools. Some liaisons allow students to take the initiatfve in contacting them. They share vv4th
school guidance offices their names, addresses, and telephone numbers, and ask the counselors to
invite students to contact them to talk about Harvard. Other liaisons visit 1heir schools once or
twice each year (usually in the fall and spring). Alumniiae often also interview appl[cants from their
schools, although they" divide interviewing responsibilities ~vith other Schools Committee members if
the load is too great for one person. Whateve~ approach you adopt through consultation vvith your
Schools Committee chair, schools should !~ow whom to call when they have a question about
Harvard, and they should feel comfortable contacting you. Open communication will best allow you
to introduce a secondary school to the College, describe what the A~hnissions Committee seeks in
strot g applicants, and invite the school to identify strong and promising candidates.

21

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018492

DX025.0041

Setting up a school visit. School policies on college representatives and their ptesence on
campus vary. Some schools designate specific visitation times; others prohibit visitation. Guidmace
staffs are orlon overworked and have to deal with many college representatives. UnOnely o5:
unreasonable demands of their or of studentsa time should be avoided. No preferential t-reatmen~ for
2 tatward should be expected. For these reasons, you will probably find it enormously helpful to
speak first with the admissions officer assigned to your region before attempting to schedule visits.
He or she can provide advice about what is and is not allowed or expected at certain high schools
and introduce you to guidance counselors with whom we have established relationships.
If you wish to visit a school to talk with students, call the guidance department yourself to
schedule a time and date to visit that will be mutually convenient for you, th e guidance deparunen~,
and the students. Guidance departments wdl often help secure a quiet and accessible place on scho:~l
grounds t-~r you to meet with students. Be explicit with guidance counselors that you welcome any
and all students interested in speaking with you about Harvard. Some alnmniiae meet xvith guidance
counselors before or after talking ~vith students or even in place o~-~alking ~vqth students. Guidance
staff can, in this way, help you to identify, students to recruit.

Early Recruitment
Early awareness. Traditio~>q] rec*a~itment strategies are no,v being expanded to increase the
pool of qualified high school students at once helping ourselves and, more importantly, raising
studentsa educational aspirations, whether those aspirations include Harvard o~: n~l. Insights we can
offer students about those quali~es the a&~issions process values--academic achievement in
rigorous curricula; disthrction, leadership, or special talent in cxtracurricular pursuits-- is most
helpful when shared with students Before or at the start of high school. There are many reasons why
Schools Committees are well equipped to nndertake ef~-orts to raise e&acational aspirations. We are
acquainted with many secondary schools and counselors and therefore have established lirms of
contact to junior high schools. We have access to recent college graduates, ~vho often make the most
effective role models, and to undergradual.es who may have attended the very schools we might
target for early awareness outreach. Indeed, volunteers for the lJndergraduate APS{inority Recruitment
ProD.am (UMRP) include at 1east two visits to junior high schools in their recruim~ent travel for the
College.
Schools Committees interested in early awareness projects slnould design programs
appropriate for their own settings. In get, era1, however, any outreach should: encourage improved
educational achievement in high school, impart greater awareness of dii-i-cmnt kinds of college
opportunities and knowledge about how to prepare for them, and provide students with some
undcrstanchng of college admissions and financial aid policies.
It is in~portant to include school personnel in the planning stages of any early awareness
program, lest our work be perceived as an intrwsion by outsiders who do not understand studentsa
needs. Schools Committees interested in establishing eaxly aware*ross effoxats should make a longterm comtrntment but begin by targeting only one or t~vo schools to fine-tune a feasible program.
Schools Commattees may wish to combine their resources vdth those of other coltege alumniiae
groups--to attract more volunteers and to broaden the programas appeal
~a~arly awareness efforts shonld not focus sotely on the most gi[~ed students; the program
should enhance all studentsa appreciation for higher education. Moreover, early awareness
conducted by Schools Committee members should not give the impression that studentsa
participation m a "ttarvard-sponsored" program might improve studentsa admissions prospects at
22

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018493

DX025.0042

the College. Contact your a~ea representative for more information about starting (or expanding)
early awareness. We have a variety of publ cations a~d a video that m~ght help your planning.
The Harvard Book Prize. Since 1910, the Harvard Book Prize has been an important and
ef[-ective way of a~tractmg the attention of talented young people to opportunities at the College.
That the 13ook Prize now also rep:esents, in more than 1,900 schools, one of" the highest awards a
school can give to a student in the junior class is a tzibute to the effectiveness of the Book Prize
Committee, which is part of the Harvard Alumni Association. Indeed, many Ha~ward Book Prize
winners choose to apply to Harvard. To help maintain Harvardas tradition of diversity, it is
{mportant to reach schools outside traditionally covered areas. An expanded Harvard Book Prize
Program can strengthen relations between Harvard and secondaW schools and encourage talented
students to consider attending I~arvard. Should you have any questions about this program, please
call tl:e HAA Clubs Office at 617.495.5732 or 800.654.6494.

Recruiting to Enhance Harvardas Visibility
I believe that student diversiPy" con~ibutes powertakflly and dkectly to the quahtT of education in colleges and
universities. Fo~ n~ore than a cenmU, Harvard has placed a ve*y high value or~ the creation of a residential comm~ufity
that bxaings together people with a wide range of backgrounds and expeziences. The breadth of views and voices in out"
universiD, challenges each of us to think harder, to see the diffexent sides of ar_y issue, to confront our oxvn assumptions
at~d r~reconcepti~ns, and to develop the kind of unde~statading that can come only when we are willing to mar our ideas
a~d ~rguments {n the company of people with very different perspectives. It also gives us the clzance to come to know,
understand, and respect a remarkable variety, of men and women wla~o~n we m.gl~t not othezawise have the oppormaiv :o
learn lion1 o~ wen to meet.

One of the Admissions Committeeas recruiting priorities is making Harvard accessible to
students from dNerse backgrounds: Here are some of our recruitment methods and obiecdves.
Recruiting minority students. National competition for talented minority students tans
escaiated since the early 1970s, when Harvard expanded minority recruitment ef~-orts. A Better
Chancc, Upward Bound, the National Scholazship Service and Fund for Negro Sit, dents, and the
Association of Black Admission and Financial Aid Officers of the IW League and Sister Schools-all of these groups work to improve opportunities for minority students. The College also reles on
the assertive contributions of alumni/ae. Please apprise students of UMRP and UAC outreach.
Harvard has long recognized the importance of reaching commutfity organizations through
which we can inform minority students of our interest and of the admissions process. Contact with
school o(-ficials, community educational organizations, churches, social clubs, and groups such as the
Urban League, the NAACP, and Tribal Councils can be fruitful. Alumni!ae o{ten recruit students
through these organizations in a fashion similar to the "school liaison."
It is important for you to know about minoriD- Efe at the Col ege, but discussions with
minority students--whether in the context of recruitment or the personal interview--should not
APSaocus on the topic o~-"being a minority." Alumni/ae should ~espond to studentsa questions aboot
multicultural activity at the Coltege~ for instance, but shoutd not ask questions that suggest students
are being ethnically screened or go through a "spedal" a&~fissions process.

23

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018494

DX025.0043

Minority recruitment offers perhaps the greatest contemporary challenge and opportuni~7
for creative admissions recruiting. Our success in this area depends heavily on your enthusiasm, and
elafort,
Recruiting economically disadvantaged students. The cost of a Harv~rd edncation and
lack of awareness of our financial aid programs dissuades many outstanding candidates from
applying. The Com=fittee seeks to attract these students because of how much a Harvard edncation
might change an individualas life .-and the life of our society--fo~ the better. Accomplished students
from economically disadvantaged backgrounds have often dislinguished themselves without the
benefit of the resources enjoyed by more affluent students. High achievement attained without such
~esources can suggest that a student possesses an unusual degree of motivation and potential to
contribute significantly to our community.
Outreach aMn to that described for attracting minoritT students can be constructive m
recruiting economically disadvantaged students: xdsiting schools outside affluent neighborhoods,
cultivating relationships with school officials, attending broad-based college fairs, and enlisi~g
HFAI, UAC and UMRP assistance. Familiarity with d~e Co!legeas policies of need-blind adn~ssions
policy and need-based financial aid is also critical.
Recruiting students from sparse connt~3,. Harvard wishes t~ draw students from aH areas
of the country--a challenge in sparsely populated areas. The Student Search List and information
gleaned from school officials and local newspapers can help you identify potential candidates. A
friendly note or phone call to introduce tl~e candidate from sparse country to Hal-yard can be au
important first step. Alunmi/ae might also wish to request HFAI, T~AC and UMRP assistance.

Recruiting Athletes
Organized athletics, intercollegiate and intramural, play a~ important role at the College. A
large number of our students participate in intramural athletics, and many Hatawrd athletes and
teams have in the last several years competed for the highes~ championships in their sports. Most
importantly, however, Harvard strives to provide a meaningful athleoc experience for those students
who elect to matriculate here~ot to de~-e!op a program for men and women whose sole i~derest in
the College is athletcs. From this pren~se it follows that athletes on campus should be
representative of the College in general--representative in their academic qualifications, their
academic and professional interests, and representative in their genecd performance and
participation in the life of the College. Such a poIicy does not in any way mea~ tl~at excellence in
sports is not or should not be a ~actor in our admissions policy. F~xtracurricular excelIence of d!
~nds has been and will continne to be extremely important in selecting students from amo*~g a large
group of qualified applicants.
Harvard works within the regulations of several intercollegiam att~lefic organiza6ons: the Ivy
League, the Eastern College Athletic Conference ~CAC), and the NCAA. As part of the Ivy
League, Harv-ard does not offer athletic scholarships. All financial aid is based solely on need.
NCAA rules are complex and occasionally inconsistent with our philosophy of athletics and, in
particular, financial aid. While the Co!lege challenges rules inimical to our interests, Haz-vard :hakes
eve~# effort to livc within the spirit of the rules, particularly those couceming recruiting. Due to the
evol~qng nature of athletic regulations, we keel) alumni!ae informed with annual "update" ~:~ailiugs
regarding rule changes and addiiions.
Alumni/ae may not have contact with atl~letes that differs m a.~y way ~-rom normal Club
conmc~ with non-athletic applicants. One point cannot be stressed enough: any v~oiation of the

~4

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018495

DX025.0044

principles, policies, rules, and regulations stated herein_ ~nd in subsequent mailings invites the most
severe penalties for Ha,ward aud our student-athletes. Questions or concerns in this area should be
directed to: William R. Fitzsimmons, Dean of Achnissions and Financial Aid, 86 Bratde St~-eet,
Cambridge, K~a, 02138, 617.:195.1557; or to Robert Scalise, Director ofAthledcs, Murr Center, 65
North Harvard Street, Boston, IviA 02163; 617.495.2204.
If you are likely- to have any contact with athlete~, please stud,v the basic ruIes of f tarvard, the
NCAA, ECAC, and Ivy Group Insd~uticms and specific regulation changes by carefully reading
athletic updates from both the Athletic and Achnissions Offices. What follows is a primer on NCAA
rules (individual rules appearing in bold lype):
All recruiting of prospective student-athletes must be done by institutional staff
members. You are considered a representative of Harvardas athletic interests as an alumnus/a,
friend, or do~or. This means that any contact you have with current o~ prospective student-athletcs
at Harvard can affect the eligibility of individual student-athletes and teams to compete in NCAA
and Ivv competition, A Adegaprospect" is any student who has started classes for ninth grade. This
meansathat recruhk~g a student who has started classes for the ninth grade is subject to NCAA rules.
Representatives of an institutionas athletic interests are prohibited from having any
contact with prospective student-athletes. Yd, may not have contact with a prospect or his or
her parents, on or off campus, in person, by telephone or in writing; however, student-ad~letes do
not have to be treated dii~erently from other applicants in the admissions process. If you are
assigmed to interview students who are also athletes by your Schools Co~nmittee chair, you may
contact the student for these purposes only. Schools Committee members may not have contact
with prospects ~vhom they are not assigned to interview. If a family friend or neighbor ~s a
"prospect," then you may continue to maintain this relationship; however, you may never have a
recruiting conversation.
Prospective and enrolled student-athletes may not be given extra benefits. An "extra
benefit" includes the provision of aW transportafion, meals, housing, clothes, service, enteri~ainment,
or other benefit no~ avgJlable to all students who are not athletes. Under no circumstances may you
provide an individua! prospect or enrolled student-athlete these benefits. Tearns visiting your area
for competition may be provided with meals while on a team trip, but you may taever take an
individual or small group of athlems or p~ospects to a restaurant tbr a meal However, enrolled
student athletes unable to travel home for holidays may be invited for a meal in your home, hut not
a restaurant. You may nov provide transportation for their trip to your home, and this may be done
only infrequently and on special occasions. Make sure you have the Athletic Directoras permission
be~~re extending an invitation. Prospectsa trips to campus must be financed by ~he Athletic
Department under specific guidelines, and invitations for such trips may only be made by coaches.
Contact the Athletic Director if you would like to contribute to a fund used for this purpose.

Recruiting Admitted Students
Schools Co~unittccs host receptions m April for all admitted students, and often in
December as well for Early Action adinits. These intbrmal gatherings, which often include parents,
should focus on Harv-ard and studentsa and their familiesa questions and concerns about attending
the College. One of the most effective recruiting tools is the conscientious avoidance of even slighdy
disparaging comments about other colleges. Pressure tactics often backfire. Alumniiae should call to
invite admitted sludents they interviewed to join them at such gatherings. This second meeting can
extend the personal outreach alumni/ae offe~ that has proven so successful to our recruitme~t
25

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018496

DX025.0045

efforts. If you cannot attend a reception for admitted students in your area, or if you live in an area
tlnat does not host such events, xve hope you will neverttaeless call and/or write to any students you
interviewed who were admitted in order to congratulate theI~q and to offcr to provide support during
line sludetl as collcgr dccision-making process.

26

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018497

DX025.0046

4. Interviewing Applicants
The interviexv is perhaps our most important recruiting tool. I13. recent years, the Adn-assions
Conamittee has been able to admit only about one of every fourteen applicants to the College, and
so alumniiae interviewers may be the only personal contact applicants have with the Ha>ward
adinissio~as process. Ensuring that the intek-view experience is positive, comfortable, and helpful is
the cornersto~ze of the critical person~ outreach you, as an alumni!ae interviewer and official
admissions represet~tative, provide to applicants.
That applicants feel that tbey have been treated with respect is another expectation the
Admissions Office has of the intetadcw. The Committee also relies on your ability to make
recommeHdations for applicantsa admission based on these f3ctors: the criteria outlined in section 2,
your own perceptions of the studentas "match" with the College, and your assessment of how well
he or she has taken advantage of available opportunities. Blessed with so many accomplished
applicants--many more that we have roon~ to admit the Committee often makes fine distinctions
among candidates. Many of these decisions hinge on intangible factors that alumniiae can
subst~r~tiate whh in erview reports that brea/he life iuto applicantsa tbldcrs.

Scheduling the Interview
Receiving assignments. To expedite inteta,iew assignments, you wilf receive basic
information about each applicant you a~e to interview: name, address, telephone number, high
school. Chairs assign interviews based on interviewer availability and accessibility, among other
pragmatic factors. You and your chair should talk about your availability--e.g., in ~vhat areas you
would prefer to interview applicants, when, and how many--before you conduit to Schools
Conmuttce work. Wh~lc the Admtsstons Commtttee appreciates the effort it takes to inter~,iew even
a single applicant, we believe alumni/ae offer more valuable individual assessments by inter~*iewing
at least four to six applicants each year. Interviewing several applicants cau expand your perspective
of individual candidates, the applicant pool, and the admissions process.
Matching applicants with interviewers. The Adrmssions Comrrtittee does not
reco~nmend a conscious policy of matching inmrviewcrs and applicants- by ethnici~, academic or
extracurricular interest, or: any other 5actor. Some applicants have reported that they felt they were
being "specialty screened" by meeting with an alumnus/a of similar ethnicitT, for example, and that
their raciai identiW was under scrutiny more than their academic achieveme~ts, extracu,ricular
passions, and personal qualities. "Matches" will of course occur in the normal process of assigning
interviews, and such assignments slmuld proceed.
ContaOing the applicant. P/ea~e ca/! ll~e ~b/icantyourreff2 We realize that our alunmiiae are
often busy and make time for interviewing among many important comn~tmen~s. Sometimes, for
these reasons, alumni/ae have a surrogate contact students. Yet students who describe their
interviews as constructive cite the personal interest alurrmi/ae took in them. Af~iead/); ~;asual, and
personal phone call can be lhejhrst sl@ ~o a positiv~" interdew experience. Be sure the student has your name
a*ld contact ka_.fi3rmafi~ i*~ case there is a <bange. AI the end of the call, slowly repeat your nan~e
and the best way to reach you.
While contacting a student via enaail can be useful, often the logistics can 10e ironed out more
easily in one brief co**versation. Be sure to check your email frequently if you do reach out via
email, as your message might get misdirected to an applicantas junk folder; follow up with a phone
27

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018498

DX025.0047

call if you do not receive a thraely response. No nccd to persist if twJo emails and wvo calls do not
produce a response, thoLtgh please n~te you~ effort on the intervie~v form and submit online.
Be clear about family involvement. Families are often eager to play a role in their childrenas
interviews. For instance, many parents will want to arrange the detdls of the interview w-ith you. T&
(,ao~,mdttee preFer,, ~hatyou set up,your inte~deavs directly with ,~tudents. Students not parents x~ill be
negotiating the day-to-day details of college. Students are often surprised when their parents
schedule an interviexv ~7~thout consultation. If you have no other option than to schedule the
interview with parents, ask them to have the applicant call to conErm the details of your meeting.
Parents might also accompany children ~o interviews. While you should indicate to applicants that
their parents are welcome to ask questions after you complete the interview, ensure that parents
kamw not to join you in the interviexv.
You may also need to reassure parents who are suspicious about the time and the place of
the interview. For instance, the Admissions Office receives calls from concerned parents ~vondering
why an alumnusia has called their daughter to come to his/her apartment in the early evening foe a
personal interview - ple:ase continue to use your good judgment in arranging the time and place for
the interview. If a candidate or their parent(s) wish to confirm your affiliation with Harvard,
encourage them to call our office (617-495-155l) and we will be happy to do so.
Selecting setting and time. When scheduling an interview with an applicant, negotia:e a
free that is mutually convenient and a place most free of distraction.s_- ~ically a public place that is
quiet, safe, and n>mmlly convenient, ~e the public library or a quiet coffee shop. Please ask ,~,hether
a student has adequate transportation to and from the intez~,iew. a21~s can affect yo~r arrangements
dramatically. While it is generous to offer to provide transport>~lion to an applicant ~o and ffrom the
interview location, we would advise against this arrangement- Instead, give the appkcant the
opportunity to suggest a location,
Ideally, you should examine your calendar and select those days and times you know you vdll
be available to conduce an interview. Then, on the telephone, you can give the student several
options; be sure to ask what is best for them, as well. Generally, the Admissions Cormnittee does
not recommend scheduling an interview that will occur during school hours or last beyond 9 p.m.
Let ~he applicant know you plan to spend no more than 60 minutes in a single~ meeting with them.
If you and the appEcant have significant difficulty agreeing to a dtne and place, it is probably
best to ha4e your Schools Committee chair re-assign the interview. Some alunmi/ae have thought
scheduling complications biased them agdnst a candidate, and others worded that--even if they
were not bothered by scheduling diftScultms--the student might perceive such bias.
The Committee knows that alumni/re can, and have, successfully interviewed students in a
variety of settings. The candidate xvSll w,q~nt ro make dm bcst impression possible and the intem, iewer
should help provide the setting for hLm/her to shine. Please be sensitive to the perceptions of
"being aionea~ m a strangeras home 0.e. the intervieweras home); any of the candidateas concerns
should be addressed at the time of the iuitial contact, and any worries put to rest. That said, we
encourage interviewers to conduct interviews in a public place that is quiet, safe, and
mutually- convenient.
Of co~arse, adhering to loca! norms and social customs in your area should be considered
and you know best what ~ese might be. While a "Starbucks" locale may serre to be an easy choice
in ceartain areas of the countU, this setting could be less than ideal in others. Again, we value your
good judgment in your interviews and have every confidence that you will display zhe same in
advance of arranging the interview, Alumni/re should be a~vare, however, of the possible
drawbacks of holding inter-views in particular locations, especially with regard to interviewing in an
intervieweras home.
28

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018499

DX025.0048

Interviewing on "neutral ground." Some alumni!ae interview on "neutral ground," e.g.
the applicantas school or the local public library. This approach usually Irfi~imizes transportation
comp ications and appeals to alumni/ae who live with their parents or who have small children.
Should you vdsh to interview a student at school, do not schedule your interview at a time that
interrupts the studentas class schedule or that requires the student to be at school at an unreasonable
time. ][fan applican~ is amenable to meefng yot~ at school, call the guidance deparnnent to reserve a
quiet place to talk. Remember, school policies about the visitation of college representatives vaW.
Some Schools Committees arrange for severa! alumniiae to interview students one-on-one
at a local school on a Saturday morning. With sufficient notice, a school vxdll open the building and
reserve rooms f{~r as many interviews as "adll be taldng pa_ace at one time, with an additional room
~eserved for parents and the second round of applicants. Alumni/ae often add certain amenises
(e.g., coffee, juice, donuts) for parents and applicants in the waiting room.
Interviewing in your home. Some alumni!ae in~-ite students to interview in their homes, a
practice t}m Admissions Oftice has increasingly come to discourage. Please note that s~ile students
and parents may express discomfort at the prospect of being interviewed in the home of someone
they do not know. In fact, some high school guidance coutqselors explicitly instru*ct their students to
reject offers to meet alumni in their homes. In these cases yc,~ should happily suggest an alternatNe
meeting location on neutral ground.
The Admissions Office suggests that interviewers select locations other tha~ their
own homes for interviews when possible, t{owevcr, we acMaowledge that sometimes it is helpfuI
or necessary to arrange intervie,x~ at the intervieweras ~ome, and under those circumstances, it is
important to bear in mind several important considerations. Be ~tware lhat interviewing in your
home may present travel complications. If you do inter~iew a student in your homo and send away
parents after they have dropped *lae student ot~; he or she might nervously xvatch the clock to make
sure parents are not freezing at the curb as they wait for the interview to end. The spouses of some
alumniiae have been incredibly ;mcon~modating by entertaining parents over coffee while their
children are being interviewed. The Admissions Committee appreciates, bat does not expect, such
graciousness. We suggest instead that you tell parents to return in forty-five minutes. Beyond
considering possible transportation complications, please be aware that a grand house might seem
impressive to a student as to be ix~timidating. Be conscious, too, of possible distractions, such as the
telephone and young children.
Interviewing in your office, Many alumni!ae interview applicants a~ work. But like a
beautifi,~l house, the boardroom of a naajor corporation or firm can be intimidating. Keep
distractions at a minimum by letting colleagues know you v,qli not be available for the duration of
your inter~de~v. Hold your calls or have them directed to your voice mail.
Interviewing in a local restaurant or coffee shop. Some alumni/ae interview applicants in
these settings, which ts fine assuming the applicant agrees. The alumni/ae interview can naake rnaW
applicants stir-conscious, so be aware that some applicants are more self-conscious if they are a~vare
that strangers--and their alumni!ae interviewers--are scrutinizing them.
We do not recommend interviewing students in their own homes. Some students
intm-~qewed in their own homes have reported they have felt as if their "f~mlly was on trial."
Intervqewing svadcnts at their homes also diminishes the control you would ottmrwise t~ave over
time and possible distractions. In the case of one alumnus who interviewed an applicant in her
home, the applicantas mother stayed through most of the meeting and became so iuvolved in
conversation that she asked her daughter to answer a ringing phone.
What applicants should wear to an interview. Your initial conversation should touch on
other issues of protocol and logistics. If applicants ask you what to wear, tell then* dm Admissions

29

CONFIDENTIAL

HARV00018500

DX025.0049

Committee has no policy about how students should dress for interviews, but that we hope
applicants wear whatever will help them feel comfortable.
On asking applicants to bring rfisum~s and other materials. Some alumni/ae
interviewers ask students to bring copies o{" tlieir extracurricular resumes to the in terview. Others
give students p~e-interview surveys. These materials can be valuable because they yield obvious
talking points. But we hope these materials will not be too detailed or burdenso*~m to applicants.
Surveys can seem to be redundant forms among so many others over which students have already
labored. Students have also reported that it was unclear how the alumnus!a would use the survey or
resume. Interviewers should acknowledge and confirm with students that providing a resume or a
survey is voluntary and by no means a required part of the admissions process.
Staffing the interview. Never interview more than one applicant at a time. A(c)he-on-one
intei~ciewing is most ef~--cctivc. A single inte~-iexver can direct an interviewas course and content more
efficiently than a panel of interviewers can. Some Schools Co~m~dttees, however, successfully have
pairs of interviewers assess a single applicant. There are ~vo common multiple-inter-viewer formats.
A group of alumni!ae can simultaneously inter~dew a single applicant or an applicant can interview
scparatdy x~qth two alummiae m a single morning or evening.
The multiple-intervicxver format c~n offer certain advantages. Post-interview discussions
allow" alumni/ae of different preferences and temperaments to check their biases when cvaluat2ng
individual applicants, and these ~scussions help the alumnus!a wtiting the intcrvaie~v report to
provide a more broadly sympathetic view of the candidate. New Scboots Commitme membe:s might
wish to join a veteran mtcrv,~cwer to develop perspective on the interaviewing process. Finally,
Scboots Conmaittees with a sur[aeit of inter~vqcwers can accommodate the interest of a greater share
of their membership by assigning an interview to a group of taro o~ three alnmni/ae.
There are pitfalls, too. Being interviewed by more than one person at a time can intimidate
students. You must take particular care to set the candidate at ease to prevent the group interview
from resembling a polite grilling. The format can also prove a difficult juggling act for interviewers.
Interviewers must selde am~mg d~emselves before the interaview begins who will ask which questions
when--orchestrations wifl~ which single interviewers need not contend. Please consider, too, the
efficiency of the multiple-interviewer format for your Commirtee. Schools Committees with small
active memberships might not be able to afford the time it takes two alumni/ae to interview a single
candidate.
Whatever approach your Scho~ls Committee adopts, let the applicant know the iutervqew
fortnat in advance, and explain why you h~ve chosen it. Each alumnus!a joining the interview
should then introduce himself or herself to the appaAcant at the start of the interview.

Conducting the Interview
Length. Let the applicant know you plan to spend no more than 60 rmnutes in a single
meeting vdth them--no matter ~vhich interview format your Schools Conamittec uses. A s~ngk
meeting, for this length of time, offers sufficient opportunity for yon to form an impression of the
applicant.
Explaining the purpose of the personal interview. Your first priority upon starting an
interview shotfld be to set the applicant at ease. Sitlk~g [:ace-to face with an apphcant rather than
allowing your desk or a large table to fill the space between you v~re ways you can help the student
feel more comfortable.

3O

CONFIDENTIAL

HARV00018501

DX025.0050

Beginning an intervie~v with a short introduction about your role in the admissions process
can also rdax the applicant. You should tell applicants that, as an interviewer, you work closely with
the Admissions Office. Add that although the Admissions Office is interested in your written
evaluation which becomes part of a studentas file it will be read in ~he context off all the ot[aer
application components: grades, ~est scores, extracurricular participation, persot~al essays, and
counselor and ceacher recommendacious. B,fany alum~iiae then reveal ho~v little they kno~v about
rl~e applicant, and that r_hey do not have access to :~pplications. Students will be less likely, then, to
assume you know everything about them, and :his can encourage dram to talk about themselves
more kredy. You should also encourage the student to ask you questions about ~mything pertinent to
the College, the admissions process, and even your own experiences as a student here.
Note-taking. Note-taking can help you recall details about your conversation that will prove
valuable in composing an interview report. App~aoaches to note-taWny vary. Some alumni/ae do not
write anything down that they would not want applicants to see. Others record mo~e evaluat:ve
co*mnents and even quotations. Still others place a pad and paper in the open, but spend tI~e first
t}~ree-fi,nrths of an intepcicw talking with an applicant and not taking notes. aAPS"nen, telling applicants
they wish to record some basic data, they ask applicants to review their current course work or their
extracurricular activities.
Note-taking, however, can prove distracting to an applicant. Asking for academic credentia s
can put a candidate on the defensive. Asking about test scores and grades first also puts undue
eznphads on "the mm~bers game." Remember that your objective is not to find out all the facts
- tlie application will disclose them. Again, the particular value ot ~he alummiae interview is
personal outreach it offers applicants and the personal dimension h~mrview reports add to
applicantsa folders. Never record intm-views.
Asking applicants for academic crede~tials. It is never necessaU to request acadetmc
credentials from studems if an interviewer pretcrs not to do so. However, there can be compelling
reasons to ask every applicant about his or her grades and scores. You~ approach in asking for this
information can help put candidates at ease and reassure them that grades and standardized test
scores are by no means the only things the Admissions Committee considers in evaluatir g
application, s. Many intetwiewers ask fbr this intbrmation near the end of the interview in a casual
tone: "So I can make sure that the AdmSssions Committee has all the information it needs in your
file, may I ask for your rest scores and g~ade infom~ation?" Others ask for the informafion at the
beginning of the interview and place those notes out of sigh~, moving quickly im~ a discussion of
other things. Yowa_aV~.prohibited, h~AC/x!_er, from contacting the high school fo~ this information.
The information must be shared voluntaxily by the applicant during the interview. If he or she
declines, theu please use your best esdm,qte to rank lhc applicant in the acadcmic categoW.
Questions to structure your conversation. Your conversatio~ should cen~er on
applicantas interests, not yours. Most interviewers begin intmviews with questions about shnple,
factua! matters that are easy for applicants to answer:
A-
A-
A-
A-
A-
A-
A-

Describe your schoolcomtnunity.
What courses a.re you taking?
Which courses do you enjoy? Why?
Which do you least enjw? Why?
In which activities are you invoDed? Why? Which do you most enjoy? Why?
What are the important activities in your school? Why?
What do you do in the summer?

31

CONFIDENTIAL

HARV00018502

DX025.005"1

A-

Do you have a favorite book? Or, which book have you recent:y read? Do you prefer
reading onli*m? What blogs oF sites do you read regularly?

These questious can help you structure the interview and allow the student to volunteer inf,~:mation
that will help you assess them. These questions can also help you pinpoint ideas, activities, and
passions that are o~interest to the candidam, which might lead to more specific discussion about
those interests.
As you talk about something of importance to the candidate, your questions should point
toward discovering motivation, commitment, and level and quality of contribution. Your questions
should be open-ended to encourage candidates to provide their own insights and reflections about
their experiences. If a student provides merely factual answers, you might wish to dra~v h~m or her
out by asking, %,Vhy?", ~How did you happen to do that?", a%gZas ihe result what you expected?"
When you talk about an idea or an intellectual concept in a book, play, current event, or research
project, encourage the candidate :o develop the idea.
Be a supportive listener. Regard a candidateas thoughts and feelings with respect and try to
appreciate each individualas unique qualities. Hear what is being said and how it is being said, but be
wa*T of t~ing to guess what is not being said and supplying motive or ~msupported insights. It is
better to report factually what an applicant said rather than to characterize what they have said. To
write, ~"J.he apphcant never sa~d more than three words at a lime, and she looked down at her hands
ah-nost the en~e tm~e" is more effective and less open to interpretation than, "He was nervous and
I think he would be out of place at Itarvard."
Avoid prolonged discussions of political and personal issues Interviewers are uot
usually judgmental about the content of an applicantas political opinions or f,qmily situation. They
use the interaction to gauge whether the studentas ideas are original and vvelLreasoned or simply
parroted from elsewbere. Conversations abont family problems can also be cited to provide
evidence of a studentas maturity- and ability to deal with adversity. The information reported can, in
fact, be nsed to boost a studentas chance for admission.
Yet students report that proIonged discussions of difficult or sensitive subjects can ruin an
interview. Such conversations include probing for opinions on politica1 topics (e.g., welfare, crime,
drugs~ abortion, capital punishmen0 r~r persrmal issues (e.g., religion, sexuality, family finances,
family illnes s, details of parental relationships and divorces). Studentsa reflections on these topics can
reveal the deg:ee to which tbey are aware of the wodd around them, and can yield insights about an
applicantas background or personality. But discussing such matters, particularly at length, can
reasonably be construed as an invasiou of privacy.
Be wary otaasklng, UTo which schuols am ym~ applying?" Aitmmi/ac often wish to
1mow what characteristics students seek in a college to measure how well they M~ow and are a matcli
for Harvard. The best way m start this conversation is to ask, a%Vhat are you looking for in a
college?" rather than, "To ~vhich schools are you applying?"
Some colleges make admissions decisions coutingent in part on studentsa perceived
co~ranJtment to their school. This is not the case at Harvard. Becm~se some students believe they
conld jeopardize their chances of admission to the College by discussing other schools, the
Admissions Committee strongly recommends that your discussions about studentsa interests in other
colleges focus on general characteristics rather than proper names.
Do not ask, "Is Harvard your first choice?" The Admissions Committee strongly
recommends against asking a student whether Harvard is his ~r her I~rst choice. The Committee
regards a studentas applicati,.m to the College as the most important interest an applicant can express
in Harvard. This question puts most applicants in the position of saying Harvard is their first

32

CONFIDENTIAL

HARV00018503

DX025.0052

choice--perhaps in spite of their actual preferences--out of {ear that they might jeopardize their
chances of admission by telling you that they might not ultimately make the same decision you did.
Questions you should askyourself as you conduct an interview. It can l~elp you write a
valuable intervqew report if you cvaluate studentsa comments as you interview them by asldng
yourself these questions:
A-
A-
A-
A-
A-
,,
A-
A-
A-
A-

A-
A-
A-
A-
A-
A-
A-
A-
A-

A-
A-
A-

Does the can&dam have potential?
Has the candidate reached her maximum growth?
Has the candidate been stretching hJ~aself?
Has the candidate been xvorldng to capacity? In her ~-u!l-time or part-time employment?
In his academic pursuits? In other areas?
Does the candidate t~ave reserve power to do more?
Hmv has the candidate used her time?
Does the can&date have initiative? Is be a sel~starter? What motivates her?
Does the candidate care deeply about anything--inteliecmal? Personal?
Is the candidate tI~.ote concerned about intellcctual subjects? Human subjects?
xgqmt has the candidate learned from his interests? What has she done ~qth her interests?
Ilow has he achieved results? With whav success or failure? Has she learned anything as
a result?
Will the candidate be able to stand up to the pressures and freedoms of Harvard?
What qualities, strengths, or weaknesses differentiate this candidate from others?
What choices has the candidate made [-or himself?. ~hy?
What is the can&dateas intellectual capacity? XXThat has she done with it?
What is the candidateas personal capacity? What has he done xv~th it?
What ts the can&dateas Harvard motivar.ion? Why and hoxv did she pick Harwrd? What
effort has the candidate made to inform himself about Harvard?
Is the candidate a late bloomer?
What is the quality* of the candidateas activities?
Does the candidate have a direction yet? What is it? If not, is she exploring many things?
Or is he just letting eveuthing happen to him? Where will the candidate be iu one year?
Five years? Twent?,-five years? "~Vill she contribute something, somewhere, somehow?
What sort of human being is the candidate now? What sort of human being will she he
in the future?
Will the candidate contribute something to H~ard and to his classmates? \Vill she
benefit from her Har~mrd experience?
Would you or other students want to room with this applicant, share a meal, be in a
semin~ together, be :earnrnates, or collaborate in a closely knit extracu~r~c~tlar group?

Questions applicants frequently ask intervie~vers. Students often ask vcW specific questions for
which you should be prepared ekber to speak ~arom your own experiences or, if you do not know
how" to ansvver their questions, to say so. These are txvo of the most frequently asked questions:
"Whatas Harvard really like?" This question probably has as many answers as there bare
been Hata~ard students. Remind students that you can only provide one perspective of life at
Harvard--your own. Sometimes, this question masks other curiosmes, many of them about whether
Harvard myths are true. Are there a lot of students at Harvard who attended private secondary
33

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018504

DX025.0053

schools? (Two-thirds of Ha:avard students attcndcd public secondary schools.) Do you lnave to be
rich to go to Ilarvard? Is Hacvard compentivc? Will I be able to do ~vell academically and participate
in extracurricular activities? These questions should emphasize how importaut it is for you to be
well informed about the current dynamics of the Harvard experience.
a"What ate my chances for admission?" Students often ask for you: assessment oAPSatheir chances
of adn-~ssion during the course of their interviews. Although the previous section addresses this
question, it is worth repeating here. It is very i~nportaut not to create any impressions or
expectations, positive or negative, about the studentas probability, of admission. Even if you think
he or she is under-qualified, it is not your place to make suggestions about their college applicatious.
Though welI intentioned, it is inappropriate for the interview setting. After alt, admissions offa:cers
of}ca par~T this question by saying, houesdy, that they cannot guess at a studentas chances until tI:ey
have read a c~mnpleted application and can assess the yearas competition. And this analysis can only
be accomplished with full access to all the matedal in an applicantas file and through the extec.sive
discussions shared and comparisons made through the Committee process.

Writing the Interview Report
Your goal in writing a personal interview report should be to help the Committee see the
applicam as a human being and to determine whether or not the student has the important
intangible strengths that might distinguish him or her in the admissions process and, if admitted, at
the College. Here are some pointers:
Showing is better than telling. The contusions expressed by an interviewer can t~ave
greater value when the reasons and basis for them are explained in the in{erview report--with
examples proving your points. TtT to supply kinds of information that would otherwise be missing
t-~om the folder. Comment on the quality, of an applicantas interests and commitments to
diffc:entiatc a particular candidate from the applicant pool.
Cite only facts that are important to the candidate or that support your judgments.
Assume tee candidate has provided general factua! background in her application. This allows the
best interpretation of the interview report, particularly since the reader will not always know you and
be able to accept automatically your conclusions. The inter~-iexv report should be more than a
recitation of activities or the assertion of a conclusion.
Comment on the quality of a studentas experiences with evidence proving the poin{.
While the combined evidence of the schoot record, counselor and teacher reports, and results of
standardized tests and AP and IB examinations pe~:mit the t~.ost complete assessment of academic
abi[iw, discussions of the content of a candidatcas sclnool ~vork, the way it is accomplished, and the
pattern and depth of his or l~er outside reading cat? yield helpfial information. For example, ifa
student is iuterested in science, information about long hours spent working in a hospital emergency
ward or building a computer can distinguish the quality of atq applicantas interest. Does the studen:
participate in athletics? If so, perhaps you can give us local context to help us assess her prowess and
potential to play here. Although wc dc~-er to the judgment of I-ta*ward coaches when considering a
studentas athletic ability, infomaation provided in intet~4ew reports can help us alert coaches to
students they might have overlooked. If he is a performing artist, do you know about the caliber of
the groups with which he performs or exhibits his xvork? Is it unusual for a student from his high
scl~ool to participate in the arts (because, for example, sports are the dominant extracurricular
activi~, or the school lacks serious clubs f-or st~dents in~erested in the arts)?

34

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018505

DX025.0054

For students to whom you are giving your support, approach writing the report as an
opportunity to "make a case" for the candidate. Why should this particular applicant come
here? What special cont~aibufion might this student make or how might he benefit f~om the Harvard
experience?
Write candidly. Interview reports sometimes telegraph impressions out of fear either of
quashing a studentAdegs chances or of appeazing too enthusiastic about them. We hope you consider the
global nature of the Comn~tteeas assessments; we seek consisteucy throughout all the materials in a
studentas folder. By itself, one blemish or even one exceptional quality or credential will neither
demand nor prevent admission. In many instances, the interview confl:ms other evidence in thc
applicantas file, and it can certainly make a difference in the ultknate decision. Balance this advice
with the fo]]ovAng note.
Consider your potential audiences as you write. Any number of individuals on the
Admissions Committee might read your reports--faculty, admissions staff, and other members of
our community. Admitted applicants who enroll at ttarvard may read lheir application flies through
the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act. (Students occasionally do exercise this rigt~t.) Be
professional in writing about a candidateas strengths and weaknesses. Avoid sla~g and comments
that could be it~terpreted as derisive.

perro~ on what can be .teen in a 60 mit;ut~ convearsatiot~ but zuho i~r also able to report fiaank[) on what was seetz
whelher it should stren4lhe~a ~r weaken a studenta.r aj~plication is of inestimable ual~,~e.
Length. Each report should include a summatT and indicate whether you feel the studcnt
should be admitted or not, and why. Reports should be as brief as possible, but not at the expense
of providing hdpful information and judgments. Do not feel pressured to polish the prose of a
report on a canc{idate with whom you have not been very impressed. We are far more concerned
wilh t}~e content of the report---~md your judgt~ents--thao the reportas styalc.
Be aware of, and suspect, your own biases. Since ,no one can really be "objective" in
attempting to evaluate another person, be aware of your biases. It is easy to feel that a student ,~vho
shares your values and enthusiasms is a veU strong applicant or that one whose view of the world
is greatly at odds with yours is confused. The good inter~#iewer makes allowances for tl~s,
appreciates a point of view on its owu merits, and evaluates tlqe interview accordingly. Somctsmes
interviewers call attention to their own preferences: ~This is not the sort {)f person I most enjoy,
but... ," or "I probably favor the student who has had to work hard...." This approach can help the
reader interpret the intcrvicw report more accurately-.
Numerical ratings. The Conm~ittee does not expect to achieve anything approaching
national consistency wi~h the use of numerical ratings, so we use them in the most general way to
show" xvhether an interview was favorable or unfavorable. In any case, the Adn~issions Corn~nittee
relies more heavily on your prose. Keep in ~nd that vve have recently changed ho~v we ask you to
assess can&dates. Consider the ranges ~br all criteria. Intc~,ie~vers somethnes comment that we do
not pay enough attcntion to r_hci~ write-ups and numerical ratings. The credibility ofyou~ ratings
depends on your use of the numerical range when you interview ~pplicants. You dimi~Jsb, the impact
of your support if, for instance, you rate everyone a "1" or "2+" across dl categories.

35

CONFIDENTIAL

HARV00018506

DX025.0055

Sending Your Reports to Cambridge and to Your Chair
After the results of a spring 2008 web use survey were tallied, numerous requests pointed to
enhancing web services available to chairs and intetwiewe~s. Snggcstions included creating an onlne
submission form, stabilizing website availabihty, allowing ch;tirs to assign intet-vicws online and
creadng club management tools for chairs. Responding to your requests, we launched a newly
designed web portal in the fall of 2008 and have revised and reorganized it subs:antially the past two
adi~issions seasons.
Even before you begin submitting interview reports, please feel free to login using your
current access code (PIN) and become familiar with the site, download updated information abou~
the College, and generally become familiar with navigating the site. If you donat remember your
access code, please use the "Forget your Access Code?" hnk on the login page in order to have the
code sent to your email address on record. As you navigate the site you can be assured that you
cannot break anything or accidentally delete yourselfl
Please fmd the site here:

Ptease begin by reviewing your profile and editing your contact information accoi:dingly. We
encourage you to use your "post.harvard.edu" address, as this will remain constant even if you
decide to ~orward your mail to a different account. As always, if you have any questions or
concerns, please feel free to contact 0~e adinissions officer assigned to your region with questions or
to provide feedback.
~nenever possible, you should use the onlhae version of the ir_terview report form. If that is
not possible, please keep a copy of your report for your records, send a second to your Schools
Commi lee chair, and send a third copy to the Admissions Office. Sending a copy to your Schools
Committee chair alerts him or her that you did the iuterview and enables hzm o~ her to give us a
cop}" of the report should xve misplace it and not be able to react~ you in a dmely fashion. We also
have several fax hnes by xvhich you can send us reports (see Documents and Forms on ~he website_.
Finally, you can send reports by mail and priority mail to the Harvard College, Office of Admissions
and Financial Aid, 86 Bratde Streetl Cambridge, ~l 02138. If you choose to file on-line, email, or
fax your reports, please remember you do not need to s,mil-mail them as well If t-or some reason
they are lost or never arrive, your area representative will contact you.

Ranking Meetings
Afalel: completing all intm~qews, some Schools Committees hold ranking meetings to
compare candidates. These meetings can approximate Ihe Cot:nrmttee process in Cambridge. If the
Schools Committee applies roughly the same standard of selectivity as the A&nissions Commtttee,
alumni/ae can better understand the strengths necessaW for candidates to distingdish themselvesa in
the admissions process. Alumniiae also have the opportunity to temper their own judgments of
candidates wheu they hear how odmr alumni/ae lnave evaluated other candidates.
Candidate rankings are valuable to us for the input they provide and to Schools Committee
members for the information they share. Any Schools Comn~ttee member who has had a greaterthan-usual share of either strong or xveak applicants for the year can also put his or her own

36

CONFIDENTIAL

HARV00018507

DX025.0056

Ja~terviewees in perspective and understand better the decis!ons ,nade in Cambridge. Ranking
meetings also provide valuable exposure for new" interviewers.
There are some caveats to consider before initiating a ranaking meeting. They ~equire
considerable time and effort. Recommendations from ranl~ng meetings are most valuaable if every
applicant from a given area is interviewed, if all interv,ie~vers have the opportumty to introdnce any
candidate for the Schools Committeeas considerations, and if all of this work can be completed
before the area person enters subcommittee meelings in Cambridge. Please keep in mind, too, that
recommendations Schools Committees make for car~didates after a 60-minute 5p, terview and ;anking
meeting discussions are additional elements---but not substantially determinative ones--that the
Committee weighs in the context o~" a~l other informatio~ in an applicantas file.

Transfer Interviewing
We may ask you to inte,-AC/-iew transfer applicants after the freshman adi~ssions season ends.
We understand these interview requests come when people are both busy and exhausted from
~nisl,i~g Ihe admissio~s process ~-or the new class. But, unlike interviewing for freshman adrmssion,
alumr~i/ae see only" pre-screened candidates. Keep in mind that a typical t~ansfcr applicantas
extracurricular activities are slightly less important than her academic focus :rod tit with the t tarva~d
curriculum. Since w-e have less personal in{om~at~on about these students than we have for
~areshmen, conveying a sense of the person in an intervicxv report is especially critical. Will the
student be happy here? How well do you think they will make the transition-academically,
socially--from their current schools to Harvard?

3?

CONFIDENTIAL

HARV00018508

DX025.0057

5. Sample Interview Reports
Marcus

Marcus is a top-~ight candidate for Harvard. We spent about an hour talking, and I was able
to learn quite a bit about this outstanding young man. He is clearly a leader both in the classroon~
and out. Marcus is vcU interested in becoming a doctor and has worked hard to acl~ieve a 3.5 grade
point average. He has also taken his college tests and has mid-650s on all. Because of his interest in
medicine, Marcus did volunteer work in a hospita! this summer. We talked for a while about the
p:e-med program at Ha~mrd.
Extracurricular, Athletic, Community, Employment, Family Commitments (2)
Substa~tial schoo/-~ade, r~gio~al ~r state recogni~iom major comdbutio~ / Ieadership.
Extracurricularly, Marcus is a strong high school contributor who could add a good deal at
college as welh tie has played the clarinet in the school band for three years, t~.kes p~ri in the public
se~wice club, and has rowed on the varsity squad for two years as well.
Personal Qualities (1)
hare peru-onal qualities and appeal
Fine young man. Very enjoyable conversation.
Overall (1)
AbsoluteS, supeNorfor admirrioas," truly unusual in the entirea applicampool
With this combination of academics and extracurrlculars 1 canat imagine that we could do
better. Please hurry and accept this fine young man. Heall make a wonderfi~i alumnus! If you need
more informa:ion, donat hesitate to call me at the numbers listed below.

Comments:

The interviewer makes pronouncements without substantZa:ing them. Where is the
evidence that Marcus is % leader both in the classroom al~d out" or that he is % strong high school
contributor"? Wha: did he do when he volim~eered i~ the hospital? How signi~cant is his
contribution to extracurricular activities? Why has he had to work hard to achieve a 3.5 GPA? Is
he taMng a rigorous academic program? Does he show any s*~s ofinte!lectud curiosity?
The ratings seem inflated by at least a full number, and ~ar from being a "dear admit,"
Marcus does not appear to be a particularly" strong candidate, based on the information we have
here. If there is stronger evidence for Marcusa admission, it should be included in the report itself,
not offered to be made available over the phone. T~e interviewer seems unaware of the
competitiveness of our selection process or the strength of our applicant pool.
3g

CONFIDENTIAL

HARV00018509

DX025.0058

Daniel
Academic (2)
MagnapotentiaL Excellent grades and mid to h{~h-700 SAT s~:o,z,s (3.3 + A(7]).
Daniel articulates his thoughts and reasoning well, and told me tbat heas "in thc top 5
percent" of his 70-member class at Ci~ Prep. His scores, as you kuow, are Jmost perfect across the
board. He enjoys science (particularly chemist_tT, "because I love takit~g a law or technique and
applying it to new mnits and in labs"), English, and history*. Akhough not certain about a career, he
is leaning tow~rd medicine. He said he enjoys English but did not seem particularly interested in
discussing literature (a particular interest o{mme given that I am an English pro[kssor), but after
talldng witi~ him more he came to the conclusion that what really intrigues him about his English
classes is the art of composifion, ~hetoric, and argument. I could tell from the way he speaks that he
puts considerable thought into the ideas tae puts forth (though he never sounded labored or took
large pauses to compose thoughts), so this inte~:est in composition sounds spot-on.

Extracurricular, Athletic, Community, Employment, Family Commitments (~)
Substantial s~hool-wid~, regional or ~ate recog~d~iot~ major conMbutmn/ leade~Wdp.
Danielas mother teaches in one of the inner-city public high schools, and she is dm one
Daniel credits for his "sense of dut2~a to others. He is very active and interested in cornmtmity
service, asked many questions about PBH, and promises that be will lead a Boy Scout troop
wherever be ultimately attends college. From his questions and thc ~vay he described his
involvement, I got the sense that his efforts were real and inspired; hcas not merely showing up for a
few hours one Saturday a semester to fulfil his schoolas service reqdirement (my sons xvent to City
Prep, so Iam qmte familiar with their service requirement and most studentsa perfunctoU approach
to completing it).
Communiv service is his maior interes~ outside the classroom, [oliowed by Model UN,
editing the school paper, and volunteering summers and time dm~ng tim school year to sundry
activities. Daniel is also an Eagle Scout. When I commented that it is unusual to encounter
somconc his age still involved ~n scouting, he said there ~vere only four other peers involved and that
he feels "duv-bound" to continue his commitment.

Personal Qualities (3+)
Above average personal quah~ and ap23ea!
Danid is more articulate than n-lost young people I have interviewed, and it sounds as if he
has had substantial public speaking opportunities through scouting and his work wilb the Model
UN. When xve started speaking about the resolutions Danid had to debate at some simulations, he
finally started speaking in a little more animated ~tshmn. For instance, Daniel expressed some
emotion when describing his assignment, as a reprcscntadve from Ireland, to defend a position
shared only by the Vatican, whose representative eventually abandoned centuries of church tradition
to leave Ireland alone contra contraception. Nevertheless, he soldiered on, tlwmgh not convincing
many others.

39

CONFIDENTIAL

HARV00018510

DX025.0059

Daniel is very interested in sports, but his invol~ cment has been bruited as a result of a torn
ACE Daniel brought a copy of the school paper and some other writing he has done. "through this
deed and m many words, too, Daniel seemed a bit aggressive in enumezating his accomplishments.
In the course of ~he interview, however, it came out that a Harvard alumnus at City Prep co~ched
his sales technique. His "reaPa personality seemed more in evidence when he asked qaaesdons such
as, "Do I have a chance m get in to Harvard even though Iave never invented anything or won the
world chess AC/kampionship?" .And he spoke with general ~di~Sration and affection for his motheras
work and his commitment to Scouting. I enjoyed spea~ng with Daniel, especially after he became
more relaxed.

Overall (2-)
Clear admit

one to recruit

Daniel, with his abundant ambition, would have no problem fitting it at Itarvard, but he is
still a bit of an awD,vard fellow, t 2e is obviously competent in getting things done, articulate, and
motivated. I-Ie would do well in a large research university.

Comments:

Two factors distinguish this report as particularly helpfu!. Firs% the interviewer cites Danielas
activities to substantiate the intervieweras qualitative comments and to justify the extracurricular
rating awarded to Daniel. Contrast this with a report thav merely lists activities and makes broad
conclusions: "Daniel is the strongest applicant for Harvard College I have ever interviewed."
Second, the interviewer quotes Daniel directly or paraphr,qses specific exchanges to justify her
assessment of the quality of his extracurricular participation and his persona! qualities. This does r~ot
make this intervieweras pcrspectiveainfalhble or doom Danielas chances for admission, but this report
conveys clearly the basis of the intervieweras iudgmcnts. The overall rating might be a bit generous,
but Daniel sounds like a candidate who wqN receive serious consideration during our dchberations.
This interview report will add an ~mportant dimension to those discussions.

4O

CONFIDENTIAL

HARV00018511

DX025.0060

Evelyn
Academic (1)
Summa potential. Genuine scholar" near-peqbct grades arm/~at scores (m most casea) combimd Mth eviderlce
daoTigina/ scholar~.Oip
Evelyn is the editor-in-chief of her schoolas literature magazine and enjoys writing poe!U.
She is also an officer in her schoolas scie~ce league team, which has won the Grayas Anatomy
contest in cardiovascular science competition for the last 3 years. She is excited about t~.Ang to win
the fourth straight competition soon. She also is in her schoolas ChemistW Charter Club, wtfich
teaches seminars for yo-anger students.
I liked her methodical approach to her ~hture intellectual pursuits. She is loo~dng for an
interddsciplinary experience in school and her career and is currently most interested in
Environmental Science and Public PoaAcy.
Sheas rcal~y very close to "trul.~ unusual" in intellectual curiosity and orig{nalily, which is ~vhy
I gave her a 1 academic rating.

Extracurricular, Athletic, Communi~a, Employment, Family Commitments (2+)
Substantial school-wide, regional or sta/~a recognilion; major co,,ddbution/ /eadenh~
What I really like about ~Evelyn was tha~ she has a handful of interests outside of school and
has focused in on those for which she has a tzue passion.
She has been svAmming competitively for many years and is on her high schoolas varsity
team, primarily now doing individual medleys and d~e backstroke. Her team is ~.pparently ve*;y
competitive regionally. She also volunteers as a swimming coach for an 8U team on weekends and
duritag the summer.
She has several of[?cer positions in extracurricular chubs and activities. She is the editor in
chief of her school literary magazine and enjoys writing poetU. She is president of the Environment
Club. She is an o~}]cer of her school Science League team, which has won several competitions (see
Academic). She is also an officer for Interact, a community service club that does t~andraisezs and
volunteers at shelters and retirement homes. She is also an office~: in her schoolas Chemistry Charter
Chub, which teaches younger students.
Evelyn has aiso traveled to some interesting places, ind~ding her parentsa countries of
c~rigin, China and Romania, as well as Israel and Greece. She has enjoyed those experiences at~d
feels that they have positivdy int2uenced her thinking and approach to different t3q?es of people.

Personal Qualities (1)
Rara petxonal appeal atad charamr
Evelyn ranks very high in all of the example characteristics listed above. She has a unique
blend of poise, confidence, sincerity, and humidly in her demeanor. She is lhought~al and expresscs
her ideas very clearly. More than most students her age, she was able to engage in a two>way
discussio ~ on a xvqde varletT of topics; she was very interesting to speak with. I enjoyed the time
spealdng qth her and am completely convinced that she will conmbute gready to her college, both
in ~e classroom arad through her extracurricular involvement and social interactions.
41

CONFIDENTIAL

HARV00018512

DX025.0061

Overall (2+)
Clear admit," one to rec,~it

While I hold the ranking of 1 for a once in a lifetime tTpe of candidate, I must say that
Evelyn was probably the best candidate for Harvard that I have rc, et in about 8 years of interviewing
She ~night no~ be the absolute best in any given candidate, but I really liked how well rounded she is
and how much she has to offer in every regard.

Additional Comments

F~vdyn visited Harvardas campus and sat Ln on some classes. She was enthusiastic when
telling me about one of the classes. She also has thought carefully about what she is looldng for in a
school, including the scholastic, community, geographical, and social aspects. When she says that
she is looking for a diverse group of students and experiences, 1 donat think sheas memorized it from
the ttarvard brochure I think she is truly- looking for and ready for ~vhat Hatward has to offer. She
will be an asset if accepted for admission.

Comments:

Although the interviewcras academic and extracurricular radngs for Evelyn seem a bit
inflated given the accomplishments cited in the report, the thrust ot? this report is clear: Evelyn is
bright, engaged, and engaging, and her interviewer recommends her highly for adrmssion. It would
have been helpfifl to read a Jew quotes from Evelyn--those things she said that led the interviewer
to write, "She is thoughtfial and expresses her ideas clearly." What were some of the many topics
about which F,velyn could engage in a two-way conversation? What did she say that made her
seem especially intellectually curious?
It is helpful to know that Evelyn is the best candidate for Harvard that the interviewer has
seen in eight years; it would be even more helpful to knox*: approximately how many candidates tee
interviewer has seen over this eight-yca~: period (Iaen? Forty?).

42

CONFIDENTIAL

HARV00018513

DX025.0062

Melanic
Academic (2)
Excelle,tt grades and low to mid 7~0 scores

Extracurricular, Athletic, Community, Employment, Family Commitments (3)
Above average activz~ orpar~cipatioz~
Melanie is involved in a n~m~ber of sports. She herself adnfits that she is no~ grea: at these
sports but she likes being active.

Personal Qualities (3)
Abo~e average appeal a~d character
Melanie seemed to be interested in a lot of different things but not otto or >.vo things in
particiar. She told me sheas veU independent, wants to see new places and experience different
things. She seems quite mature.

Overall (3)
Stro~g candidate
I donat feel there was anything that really stood {~t~t for Melanie. It,s difficult tO write a
strong review- for her. She is definitely a smart young lady but i donat fed that she necessarily stands
out reladve to other candidates i have interviewed in the pas~.

Comments:

Not every interview report will advocate for a candidateas admission, so it is not fl~e
intea_-vieweras lack of support for Melanieas case that gives pause m the admissions ofEcer ~eading
this write-up. Rather, it is ~he lack of any narrattve comment about Nlelanieas academic rating and
the seemingly cursor- treatment of her extracurricular ms~olvement that stand out.
it may be the case that ~he only activity Melanie is involved in is her sports, but this report
does not make ~hat clear. Did Melanie mention any other commitnmnts (i-am.ily, school, or
otherwise) o~ interests ~hat occupy her time? Did the interviewer ask about other involvements?
Later in the report the interviewee notes, "Mdanie seemed to be interested in a lot of different
things but not one or ~vo things in particular," which seems to indicate that Melanie expressed
other interests besides sports. To be a competitive candidate fo~ Ha~-vard, a student need not focus
exclusively on one or two pursuits (academic or otherwise), which is the impression gleaned from
this short report. An extra sentence or two providing more detail in each section would g~eatly
improve this report.

43

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018514

DX025.0063

Anthony
Academic (2-)
Magna potentml. Exce//ez~t grades and mid- to h~h-700 scores (33 + ACT)
An:hony is the stron~,est student iave interviewed out of West High (19% to four year
colleges) m at least 10 years. ]
~,~a~0:
],,-as probably on par ~xdth Anthony, though she
was a humanities winded student, whereas Anthony is more quan~itat~vel-y, strong. Highpoints are
his ACT math and science scores (35 and 36, respectively) and SAT Math I/(800). Verbally, too,
hcas ~ight years ahead of i]~e other" students l see from his high school. If I had to guess I xvouid say
that heas a bit o~an academic loner at his school since Anthony admitted that "most of my friends
donat get as excited about school as I do...I guess math just comes easy to me, and I like the brain
teaser problems the teacher gives us at the end of each class." Anthony w/l! take his first AP ~ests
tl-fis year, and Eeas most excited about calct~lus and physics, his two favorite classes this year. He was
disappointed that West got rid of the AP ChenAPSstry class last yea~, so he set~led for honors. He is
also the schoolas high scorer in the city- math league. He was ranked third out of 816 at lhe end of
last year, though he admitted that his class size will prob,qbly fall as students continue dropping out
throughout the senior year.
Auchonyas not a o,m-trick pony acadet~cally, though, t always ask West smdcnts about their
junior theme for honors English, and Anthonyas disc~ssion d~out his paper xvas t~ae most interesting
Iave heard in a long time. Heas researching water rights disputes in the ciD"s histoU, and heas trying
to find out how different waves ofirmrdgration have changed the tone of the debates or affected
axgurnents for or against titT expansion. Anthonyas having a hard time fi~:ding sources and his
interviewas arenat going the way he planned, but I give hhn credit for having a h)l)othesis and
gathering the evidence. We talked about some of the courses I took as a HistoU and I,iteralure
concentrator (mosEy about France and the U.S.), and he seemed interested in those, too, asking me
questions [ hadnat thought about s~nce college.

Extracurricular, Athletic, Community, Employment, Family Commitments (5)
Substantial activi(y outride of conventional activilies smh a~" majorfamily comn;~a/ments or term-time ~,,ork
Anthony works 20~ hours each week at the local K.F.C., and he doesnat have a lot of thne
f~)r other activities. Heas been working there for almost two years now. He cooks, buses tables, and
works the register. The major downside, he says, is "coming home smelling like a bucket of
chicken." A lot of the kids I interview at West work part-time, but Anthony works more than most
of them and is a bcttcr student than almost all of them. 2 asked him what he spends his money on.
tie said he tries to save f~r college but usually rends up helping his mother pay for things around the
house, buying all of his own clothing, and paying for evetTthing associated with his car, which heas
proud of.
Anthony does a few activities at school that he can do during lunchtime meetings or during
his study hall (student government, class day- committee). [ was mnprcssed that he works in the
school tutoring center during his free period, becm~se I imagine he could use that time to do his
homework. He wants to sing in college or do more comn~uni~ service, possibly tutoring. I was
surprised that he had already heard about PBHA and some of the singing groups on campus. He
said he learned about them xvhen a Harvard undergraduate did a presentation in his school last
March, and he read more about them on the internet. He sounded excited by the IOP and the
44

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018515

DX025.0064

visiting ~ellows, but hc hadnat heard of it before. Actually, he was excited about eveud~ing Harvard
has to offer, and I think head discover lots of other interests ~vhen heas actually on a college campus.

Personal Qualities (2)
Stro~ personal appeal and character
I was excited to meet Anthony, and it was fun to talk to someone [rom West who is so
clearly interested in his schoolwork and is doing so well. I coold ~dl that he must be good at his
Ia-2baC job because he has a real presence about him. He makes a very favorable impression.
I do think be was a bit nervous (maybe more excited than nervous?) for the first 15 minu~es
of our it~terview, but be l{~sened up completely by the end, and we ended up talking for more than
an hour. He also has a sel~deprecating, observant sense of humor that would setare him well at a
place like Harvard. A highpoini of our interview was when he told me a very fi~nny stoU about
making "bootleg chicken" after hours at KFC! Apparen~dy the~e are people who make deals with his
manager to cook their own chicken in the KFC fryers for events like family reunions and parties
because itas much cheaper than I~nying it flaom KFC and much easier than doing it at home. I told
him he should write a sho~t story about ttne experience.

Overall (2-)
C~aear admit

one to rectal/,

I think Harvard could use more students like Anthony. Ite would probahly have a bit of an
adjustment to Harv-ardas acadc~mcs, but he has raw talent in spades, and heas never been in an
environment vAth other students who were eager to ]earn. Netther of his parents has an education
beyond an associateas degree, so he wo~ld be the f]rs~ in his f~ami[y to go to college. Morn is a fi:ont
desk manager at the local Radisson. Dad is out of the picture, from wt~at I could gather. Anthonyas
a rolc model for his t~vo younger siszers, and he xvould be a role rhode2 for other stuc~enls at West
and in the city if he xverc accepted.

Comments:

This de~ailed report about Anthony, a high-achieving student of modest means with a
substantial termqime work comn:ivment, helps paint a nuanced picture of Anthony as a thoughtful,
lively person and excellent student. Ha,~v-ard has long sought to recruit and enroll high achieving
students of modest means, and the interviewer helps make a case for why the Committee should
consider Anthonyas canclidacy seriously.
The report is especially helpful ~br telling us what Anthonyas interests are and xvhat he would
like to do in College even though t~e hasnat bad time to pursue those interesta in high school. From
the report it is also clear that the interviewer understands West High School and liow exceptional a
student like AnthoW is coming from the school (at least in terms of applicators t~ Hat-yard).

45

CONFIDENTIAL

HARV00018516

DX025.0065

Wilbur
Academic (3+)
Uu#~ /a~tde pote~tia/. Good grades a*Td mid-600 to/~w-700 scores

Wilbur Smith is a young, rather nervous fello~v of sL,~teen (he turns seventeen next month)
who used up most of the interview ti*~ne t~ying to elicit from me some indication of whether he had
a good chance of being adrratted to Harvard. No matter how much ~[ tried to steer the conversation
to other topics, somehow xve always returned to that one. Consequently, my impression of him is a
bit vague.
It is unclear to me wby Wilbur Smith should manifest such insecuril~. ~te is certainly not a
poor candidate: his test scores are all in the low 700s, with the exception of a 610 in chemistry.
When we came to the subject of histoU and government, his intended major, he did seem to
manifest a genuine interest in the departments here.

Extracurricular (3-)
Sotid par/i@at~on but ~dthout dkatmcfio~*.
At his school he is score in the Speech Club (preparing and delivering them at tournaraents),
on the soccer team, and on {ira football team. He elaborated very litde about activities, but focused
instead on asking questions. He did not mention aW significant leadership roles.

Personal (4)
Some~vhat ~eu/ral or sh~h/.l), ,~egalive impre.~ion.
i sensed that Wilbur has absorbed the idea of going to an ambitious college more from his
atmosphere than from his internal desires. There was a ce~t,qin immaturity in his questions ,qnd lhe
plethora of them a!erted me to the fact that perhaps he felt he had to ask them so that I would not
think hin~ apathetic.
What struck me though was h~s nervous manner, his obvious confusion when he blu~ed out
that he had been visiting other colleges, and his embarrassment xvhen he felt that many o~ his sco~es,
etc., were not up to Harvardas standards. He seemed especially curious about the a&nissions
process, dmt is, the process behind the scenes.

Overall (4)
Acceptable butperhaps ~ot competitive compared ~o other apph~vm~:
I am puzzled by the impression Wilbur gave during this inte~wiew. I am not sure whether it
was his youth or the fact that he got lost on the way and arrived quite. ]ate or perhaps his confusion
as to his own aspirations. In any case, I hope his teachersa reports and his essay g~ve a better sense
of what he is really like than i have been able to do here.

46

CONFIDENTIAL

HARV00018517

DX025.0066

Colnments:

This is an incredibly helpful report, targeting those personal qualities of the candidate that
suggest he wou!d not be a good choice for us. The interviewe~ acl~owledges that perhaps she
did not see Wilbur at his besl, but she also gives us enough concrete information and examples
of his behavior that we feel confident in her evaluation of Wilbur. The tepor~ certainly gives us
a vivid picture of this young man mad provides the type of insight we ~re unlikely to get
else~vhere in the application.

47

CONFIDENTIAL

HARV00018518

DX025.0067

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018519

DX025.0068

Schools Committee
Chairperson Handbook

2011 - 2012

Offi~* ofA dmissioas and Fiaanciat Aid
86 BratlJAC/ Street
Cambridge, ~L~ 02138
Reviredjal! ~j 20* 1

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa

HARVO0018520

EYES ONLY

DX025.0069

Table of Contents

Introduction .................................................................................. 1

2. Managing Membership ....................................................... 5

T~ainh~! L~dadn~) Committee Voi~ ~teer, ...................... 7

3. Managing Student Recruitment ...................................... 10

aIahc Nlorato~:~um ....................................................................... I I.

a. M=n=ging l~te~iew Assignee.is ..................................

INTRODUCTION
Schools Committees are the backbone of Ha~mrdas admissions omreach. We appreciate the
time and effort that you put into this work and hope this document will help you coordinate your
Schools Committee efficiently, it assumes familiarity with the 2011-2012 Inte~wiewer Handbook,
but several important items are repeated here. Section 1, "The A&~fissious Calendar," presents a
timetable of the admissions season, by which you should schedule your Schools Comnfitteeas work_
Section 2, "Managing Membership," includes information about ekgibility, con~Ncts of interesb
training new Schools Committee members. It also offers advice on solictung aiumni/ae to join your
Schools Co~ttcc and on organizing ~hem to recnfit and inte~dew students most efficientlya.
Section 3, :aManaging Student Recruitment," focuses on some of the nuts and bolts of that work,
and Section 4, "Managing Interview Assignments," focuses on processing interview requests.
As the world of college ach~-dssions changes, so do the best approaches to recruitment.
Please share your successful recruiting ideas so that we can share them w~th other chmrs. As al~vays,
please contact the Admissions Office if there is any way that we can be of assistance. Again, thank
you fo~ all of your help.
Staff resources. Your usual contact in the Admissions Office is your area adnafissions
representative. In addition, Elizabeth Adams (SSDfo@jas.harvard.edu, 617.496.68"75, Fax:
617.495.8821) is also a critical contact. F, lizaheth supervises the maintenance of interviewing
records, from Schools Committee rosters to lists of applicants aszgned for interviews in your area.

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018521

DX025.0070

The Cambridge Admissions Conference (CAC). EveU fall, we invite you to Cambridge
to review admissions and financial aid issues. We host CAC to coincide with the fall IIAA meetings
and a home football game. CAC allows us to address your concerns, and gives you the opportunity
to renew your acquaintance with Cambridge staff, the College, Cambridge, and Schools Committee
members ~i:om across the countW. We hope you share your :insights [-tom (;~\c with your Schools
Committee members. This year CAC xvill be held beginning on October ~3*~a and x,dll continue on
the 14~ and 15~ra.
Schools & Scholarships Committee of the Harvard Alumni/ae Association. About 50
alumni!ae oi~ the National Schools & Scholarships Committee of the Harvard Alumni!ae
Assoc-iadon advise us c~n martins o~" both ~ational and local policy three thnes each year. We
co,~krnunicate any changes in our frequent newsletters to you and in newsletters to all Schools
Committee members.

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018522

DX025.0071

1. The Admissions Calendar
To help plan your Schools committeeas activities, here is an abbreviated admissions calendar.

JUNE/JULY
Survey current interviewers about
contimting Schools Committee work; their
assessment of their own performance in the
preceding season; m=d faor address
telephone, and e mail changes
A- Update list ofintmviewers on S&S website.

Encourage dumni/ae liaisons to re-connect
with assigned schools in your area.

JULY/AUGUST
A- If you wish to increase yore Comnnstteeas
membership, contact Elizabeth Adams for a
list of ahmmiiae in your area to solicit,
A- Order copies of our new recnfiting
brochure (the "Mutt") that your Schools
Committee vxdll need for the yearas
recruim~em activities.
A- Plan and host an end-of-summer picnic for
underg~a&~ates and your Corrmfittee.

OCTOBER THROUGH FEBRUARY
A- Cambridge Admissions Conference (always
coincides with :he [~all HAA meeting).
A- Assign interviews as soon as requests arrive
from Cambridge. Follow-up vdth assigned
interviewers to ensure interviews occur and
reports are sect as soon as possible to
Cambridge. Encourage interviewers to
submit reports on the S&S webs[re.
A- We begin our careful ev~q!uation process of
Early Action applicants.

AUGUST TO OCTOBER, AND
ONGOING
A- Assign club members as liaisot~s to
individual high schools. Sche&~le school
visits or other recruitment events,
consulting with area officer as needed.
A- Respor_d to all college fair invitations after
recruiting Schools Committee members to
cover event~. Ensure supply of Murrs and
"aone-pagers" (available online) to cover
th e s e even ts.
A- The Admissions Office sends you and all
Schools Committee members an e-mail to
indicate that onliue resources have been
updu ted.
EARLY SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER
A- Confer wilh yotir staff representa:ive in
Cambridge about joint travel to your area
and events your Sct3ools Committee migbt
sponsor.

Hold an organdzational tneeting for your
Schools Co~mnittee. IFan admissions
officer will be in your area on joint travel,
meet with him or t~er and encourage dub
members to join you.

NOVEMBER
A-

November 1: Deadline for spplication
materials t-or Single Choice Early Action
applicants.

A-

Prioritizeinterview assignments for Early
Action applicants, as subcommittee
meetings for Early Action candidates begin
in mid-November,

A-

Confcr with your staffrcpresentafive for the
subcommittee and full committee dates that
correspond with your area.

DECEMBER
A- Full committee meetings for E>~rly Action
candidates take place the first week of
December.
A- December 15: Decisions for Early Acton
can&dates are mailed/e mailed to students.
A- Reach out to congratulate students admitted
Early Action, and when appropriate, invite
to local Harvard Club events.

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018523

DX025.0072

Begin assigning inte~wiews for Regular
Decision candidates.

JANUARY/FEBRUARY
Deadline for Regular Decision application
materials: Jan._~l.
A- Continue to assign interviews as soon as
requests come fron, Cambridge. Follow up
~xith assigned interviewers to ensure
interviews occur and reports are sent online
as soon as possible to Cambridge.
A- Ensure all apphcants from your area have
been interviewed (ideally by mid-[ ebrua~.
A- Confer with your staff representatb,m about
applicants from your area.
A- Subconm~ittee meedngs begin the ftrst week
of February. Please attempt to have all_
interview reports for candidates sent to
Cambridge by Jae time your subcommittee
begins to meet.

number of transfer candidates. Follow up
with assigned interviewers to ensure
interviews occur and reports are sen~ qa~ckly
to Cambridge.
MAY
A- Admitted smdent~ must respond to offer o~
admission by May 1,201L
A- Share wi~h interciewers the information
al0out which admitted students have decided
to matriculate.
MAY/JUNE
A- Confer with staff representative abou~ wait
iist candidates in your area, shotJd the
Admissions Comn-nttee be able to admit
students (corn the wait list.

MARCH
A- Confer with your staff representative about
applicants about whom you have new
information. Ensure that all area applicants
have been inlerviewed.
A- Full Committee meetings begin the first
week of March. The last opportuni~ for the
vast majority of cases to be heard is during
full Committee. The Admissions
Committee must have all i~nterview reports
in hand for full Committee.
LATE MARCH/APRIL
A- Decisions sent Thursday, March 29, 2012.
A- Following the end of the moratorium on
Friday, March 30 at 8 a.m. candidateas loom
time, share with interviewers the Admissions
Committeeas final decisions on your areaas
applicants, and encou~ge dram ~o call to
congratulate admitted students they
mte~AC/iexved.
A- Hold reception for admitted students and
parents.
A- Visitas Program lacr admitted students:
Saturday, April 21 to Monday, April 23.
A- Assign intervie~vs for transfer applicants if
requested by y,-n*r area officer. Transfer
interviews are only conducted for a small

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018524

DX025.0073

2. Managing Membership

ELIGIBILITY
Participation in Schools Committee work is open to alumni!ae of Hat~aard College as well
as our graduate schools. Important prerequisites include broad knowledge of the College,
enthusiasm fl~r you~ experience as a student at Ha~avard, and sincerity of purpose in wet "king with
prospective co21ege students, their families, schools, and the general public.
POTENTIAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST
As a member of your local Schools Committee, you become a voluntau, but no less official
representative of Harvard Co]lege. Accordingly, it is critical to avoid circumstances that might
suggest an appearance of inapp~:opriate or duplicitous conduct, zMumni!ae who of[)r coEegc
counseling services for a fee, for example, are required to stop Schools Committee work.
Interviewcrs whose children are planning to apply to Harvard College are obligated to refrain from
doing Schools Corm-nittee work for a year, or a least through the fi~]t completion of the admissions
cycle. (Your corraTvt~ee members shAPSuld aIert you to this possibility during the sunu-net before the
ci~ildas senior year of high school.) We similmly request that individuals refrain from interviewing [ao~ both
Harvard and another undergraduate institution. In addition, of course, you must make all interviewing
assignments with total objectivity, wtzile applying appropriate sensifivi~ to personal, business or
other c{m~.ections to candidates for admissions.
Should you have any questions about a possible breach of good faith about your role
as a volunteer for the Harvard Admissions Office, please contact the Admissions Office to
speak *vith your staff representative.
CONFIDENTIALITY
Never discuss what you know abo~t students with anyone, gven vAth school officials. I,There
is one exception to this rule that can also raise potential problems of confidentiality: holding a
ranldng meeting or othmawise sharing information about any candidate within a particular Schools
Committee.) Confidentiaht3~ is espedally important when wocking with the general public. Even
well-intentioned com~nents can reveal--sometimes disastrously--mo~e than was intended. A
principal or com~selor asking why the Committee denied a student admission needs only Io hear the
appkicant "was not well supported" to go after teachers.
MAINTAINING SCHOOLS COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP
Interviewing applicants is pcrhaps the Collegeas most important recruiting topoi. Ensuring
that the interview experience is positive is the cornerstone of the critical personal outreach you and
your Schools Committee members provide to appficants. As a chair, your first priority, is ensuring
~hat you attract enough enthusiastic alumni/at to complete interviews for alt candidates from your
area. Schools Committees can rccrui~ *n other ways, too, and your Schools Comn~tteeas success
depends largely on how n~any volunteers you can attract to your Corma~ittee.
Keeping your list current. Each fall you should update your mte~aviewevsa contact
information on the S&S website. Updating e-mail addresses is crucial. Though tedious, maintaining
an up&led database ~vill help you minimize scheduling snafi~s in the ~all and winter, when you
receive dozens of requests f~r interviews from us--and for represemation at college fairs by local
schools. To hdp your revisio*~s, we suggest sending each of your active Corrmdttee members an
end-of-the year survey asldng alumni/ae for updated contact intormation (_especially e-mail) as well
as these questions:

H~GHLY CONFiDENTiAL - ATTORNEYSa

HARVO0018525

EYES ONLY

DX025.0074

GENE1L~L INFORMATION
!. When betwccn October and FebruaU wonat
yon be available to assist in Schools
Comrmttee work?
2. In which high school district do you reside?
3. Do you have chJdren attencling any area
high sclnools? What are their ages?
INTERVIEWING
1. How many intet~#iews can you conduct this
year? [The average is 4 to 6.]
2. ~here and when can you interview
applicants?
3. If you have previonsly interviewed
applicants ~o Harvard, is there information
that would be helpful as you irtterview
future applicants?
COLLEGE FAIRS
1. Will you be available to attend any loca!
college

2. When wilI you NOT be available to attend
college fairs?
SCHOOL VISITS
1. Will you act as a liaison to a school
co~ulmniw?
2. How many schools can you work with as a
liaison?
3. Can you visit N0~ schools during school
honrs?
4. Are you interested in assisgng early
awareness efforts?
5. Are you x~!~ng to spotasoc a Ha~AC/ard Boo~<
Prize at your local or other ~ea high
~chools?
COMMITTEE EVENTS
Can you host any of these Schools Committee
events: Summer picnic for area undergraduates;
fall orie~ta tion meeting; ranking meeting; spring
reception for admitted students from your area.

Rotating Schools Committee responsibilities. Using the results ofvohmteer smaveys, you
can better decide how to assign Schools Comrmttee work. Asking alummiae volunteers to assess
their own strengtha and weaknesses as a recruiter or interviewm: o[ff.rs you the opportunity to
redistribute responsibilities accordingly--e.g., you can assign more college nights to alunmiiae who
prefer staffing these events or you can assign fewer interviews to alumni!ae who do not provide the
Admissions Committee valuable commentary {m applicants.
Recruiting new volunteers. The Harvard Alumni Association maintains a database of
alnrnniiae and their addresses and e mails--a useful data source to recruit new SchooIs Committee
members. Please contact Elizabeth Adams (ssintb@tas.harvard.edu) to run a list for yo~*. We have
been able to tailor lists to various specifications: gradtaates of the College who live within certain ZIP
codes and who graduated within the last 20 years, etc.
Using some method ofpre screening, akin to the annua1 survey of active members, can be
helpfi~l. The Admissions Committee hopes that all alumni!ae involved in recruitment and
interviewing are eager to make these experiences positive for prospective students, their pare~ls, and
school officials. Moreover, answers to pre-scceening sucveys can also help you assign Schools
Committee work to the most appropriate volunteers.
You may wash to adapt your own solicitation based on this sampte:
Dear Alumnus/a:
Each year the Harvard College Admissions Off~cc relies on local alumni/ae ~o
help recruit and interview high school students who apply from (area). We arc eager
this year to expand our alumniiae team, and we are writing now to invile yon to
consider helping us interview a growing, exciting, and diverse group of applicants.
Each alumnus/a is assigned to interview four to six applicants on average each
year and to provide the Admissions Committee a w~itten report of each interview.
Ta:~is personal outreach can be helpful for the applicant as well as the Admissmns
Co~mittee, allowmg t-or a thorough a&nissions process. As part of Schools

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa

HARV00018526

EYES ONLY

DX025.0075

Committee work, you might also be asked to represent Haiward at college fairs, to
act as a liaison to a local school, and to assist in other Schools Committee work.
If you are interested in joining ~s, please complete and return the enclosed
survey. There vall soon be a meeting of our interviewing group in (area) to which
you will be invited if you are interested in this important work.
Thank you very nmch for your support, and we hope to work with you in the
coming year.
If you need additional support in recruiting new volunteers, contact Elizabeth Adams.
Managing membership when you have too many volunteers, Few Schools Co,rm~ittees
a~tract more volunteers ~han there is work to assign. But if you face this happy dilemma, consider
establishing a rotation of active members for each aspect of Schools Committee work as well as
informal wait list for the balance of interested alurnni/ae.
Managing vohmteer complications. You might wish to assign alumni/ae volunteers who
have demonstrated consistent difficulty completing assignments on time orwho do not present a
welcoming or current impression of Harvard to less demanding Schools Committee jobs. We
recognize that such re-assignments require discretion and diplomacy; do not hesitate to discuss
potential problems with your slaff representative.

TRAINING ~MND UPDATING SCHOOLS COMMITTEE VOLUNTEERS

Fall organizational meeting. Wc recommend 1ricking off each admissions season ~dth a
meeting of your Schools Commitme and those akunniiae interested in becoming volunteers. ,%Ve
recommend a separate orientation session, as well, f,:~r new voluntccrs.) Confer with your area
representative in advance for an update on any new a&nissi(ms procedures or policies, or try to
s chedule your meeting to coincide with a J oint ~AY=avel recruitment trip to your area.
Your agenda depends on several mundane factors. How many alumni/:~e wiaJ attend? ltow
familiar and experienced will your audience be with Schools Committee work? What h,qve members
expressed :nterest in learning more about? Wili yottr slaff representative be present? Here are some
options to consider:
A-
A-
A-
A-
A-
A-

Tntroduce Schools Comtrfittee officers and
returning membcrs.
Int~o&*ce new Committee members.
Review preceding admissions season;
oudine local procedures.
Review the new publicaaon, the
and other docmnet~ts on O~e S&S wcbsite.
Review financial aid policies.
Review interviewing practices. Your staff
representative can conduct such a session, if
preset~t. Othm~aise, confer with your area
representative about matertals you might
share wilh your Schools Committee. Some
chairs choose to circulate sample interviews
written by members of their own Schools

A-

A-

Committees to illustrate helpfu! and
unhelpful aspects of interview reports.
Please note that the inte~tieweras handbook
contains sample interview reports.
Review Harvard news. Review the "XVhatas
new at Harvard" document on the S&S
xvebsite for a list of recent changes academic, extracurricular, residential,
social at the College. ~Ihis can provide a
valuable supplement to the information
offered h~ our publications and from your
contact with undergraduates from your area.
Consider printing and distributing the
one-page (double-sided) Interviewing
Tips Sheet, a condensed version of the
intervieweras handbook.

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018527

DX025.0076

Host a casebook session. We have selected
scverai applications to the College,
protected the anonymity of their authors,
and adapted them to a casebook.
Admissions of[2cers run casebook sessions
for Schools Committees, other alumniiae,
and guidance counselors ~o simulate how we

read, discuss, and vote on in&vidual cases.
If an admissions officer ,xdll be in the area, it
may be possible to conduct a shortened
casebook sess*on (perhaps by reviewing just
one case and examining how an intmwiew
would change the decision) as a training
tool.

Fall orientation meeting for new interviewers/interviewer training. Depeuding on
your fall meetingas attendance and agenda, you might need to hold a separate orientation meeting ~or
new intevdewers. Yotn: orientation should address the process your Schools Committee has
established for recruiting students (e.g., attending coltege fairs, acting as liaisons ~o local schoo!s,
etc.) and for interviewing applicants (e.g., how many alurnni/.qe interview individual students at a
time, whedmr your Schools Committee holds ranldng meetings, etc.). Please review these critical
points, too:
Schools Committee members are considered official representatives of Harvard. This
designation entails three primary responsibilities: 1) The NCAA regulates the recruitment of
smdent-athletes by official college representatives, which we outline in the Interaviewer Handbook
a~d in this documm~t on pages 12 to 13. 2) Prospective applicants, their families, and secondary
school officials will expect Schoo!s Committee members, as official representatives of Harvard, to
be well informed about the experiences of current undergraduates as well as the mechanics of the
admissions process. 3) AIumni/ae on Schools Comrm~tees should also be aware that, as o[*icial
representatives, they wi!l personify "/-tarvard.ColIege" to some degree, if not totally. In recent years,
the Admissions Committee has been able to admit only about one of ev-ery fou~::een applicants;
alumniiae interviewers may be the only personal contact applicants have with a Ha~aard graduate.
That prospective students fed they have been treated with respec: is one of tl~e most important
cxpcctations the Admissions Cormnittee has of alnmni/ae volunteers.
Alumni/ae on Schools Committees recruit students as wetl as intetwiew them -- but
there is an important distinction between the two activities. When recruiting, alnmni/ae
should introduce students to and inform them about Ha~ward and the admissions process. They
shouid not act as interviewers, who inform applicants about Harvard but also evahm~e them for
admission. Recruitment efforts should not be pertBrmed---or perceived to be performed--as a
prelimina~T screening of prospecfve o~ ~mtual applicants to ~he Collcgc. Nevertheless, alumniiae
should use the information presented in section 2 of the I~tcrviewer Handbook to inform their
advice to students.
Even after starting to interview applicants, new interviewers should contix~ue to talk wilh
Schools Con~nittee veterans about conducting interviews, evaluating applicants, and writing reports.
Some Schools Committees pair new interviewers wth more experienced ones and have them
conduct ~,o to three interviews as a team. Post-inte~wiew discussions allow alumni/ae to check
their biases when evaluating individual applicants for the first time, and they help new intet~aiewers
writing reports to provide more broadly sympathetic views of candidates.

H~GHLY CONFiDENTiAL - ATTORNEYSa

....

HARV00018528

EYES ONLY

DX025.0077

Be sure interviewers are aware how this approach can affect interview dynandcs. Being
interviewed by more than one person at a time can intimidate students. The format can p~7ove a
dift~cu~_t }uggling act for intel-viewers. Interaviewers must settle among themsdves before the
interv-iew begins who will ask which questions when--orchestrations xvith which single inter-viewers
need not contend. Interviewers must also take particular ca~e Io set the candidate at case to prevent
the group interview from resembling a polite grzlling.
August picnic. Several dubs host an August picnic to wish undergraduates from your are~q
well as they prepare to return to Cambridge and, incidentally, to keep current Schools Comr~Sttee
members in touch with life at the College. You might wish to consider scheduling this event before
the others above, yet we have listed it last because we believe that it is of lesser priority than, for
J~lst:m~ce, the orientation meeting.

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018529

DX025.0078

3. MANAGING STUDENT RECRUITMENT

Section 3 of the Inter~dewer Handbook addresses some practical methods to recruit students
to the College. We repeat much of that text here for youc convemence wiih iz~ore explicit
suggcstiot-~s tc~ assist you in coordinating student recruitment and delegating Schools (;ommivtee
respot~sibilifies.
THE COLLEGE FAIR
Organizations sponsori*~g col!ege fairs send notices to us year round. We will send copies of
these notices to you. Since the Admissions Office receives literally hundreds of these invitatioras and
many are for events far from Cambridge, it is often not feasible for staff members to attend ~Lrs.
We hope your Schoots Committee will staff as maW college flairs as is reasonable and constructive.
Which fairs a~e worth attending? If you have any doubt about whict~ events are
worthwhile, confer with you~c staff representative. As the Interviewer Handbook holes, fairs dif~-er
widely (and wildly) in type, size, and turnout. Prospectivc applicants and families attendit~g c~llege
fairs demonstrate a wide range of familia~i~~ vdth Harvard. Even as some of these factors would not
seem to recomanend attendance at many college fairs, if Harvard is not represented we often give
precisely the aloof and uncarmg impression of Harward we hope to combat. Plus, we can miss
attracting students we ~vish to reach, Many students have noted how an initial enconnter witt~ a
helpful and enthusiastic alu~nnus/>~ sparked their interest in Harvard. Staff representatives
appreciate knowing which fairs in their area were attended.
Who should attend college fairs? Enthusiastic, high-energT, Schools Committee rnen~bers
a~e often best equipped to staff college ~-airs. Chairpersons have often fi~und that recent graduates
enioy cepreset~ling tt~e College and find t~cm fairs a good way ~o become acquah~ted witl~ Schools
Comt~ttee work. College fairs can test enducatme (fairs often run three hours or more) and
versatiliD~. Attending them, for some families, subsiimtes fc~r studying dozens of college guidebooks .
and websitcs. For other families, the college fair is an opportunity to discuss in detail with a college
representatNe what they have read and heard f~om friends. In a g~ven evening~ you might be asked
eveuthing from, a%~ahere is Harvard?" to "V-91~at success do I Iarvard students bare in medical school
a&~:issions?" and you might be asked these questions many times over.
What supplies will you need to attend a college fair? a[he Admissions Office can
provide a table banner, which will identify Schools Committee members as Ha:yard representatives.
Clubs should keep this and reuse them for future fairs. With enough advanced notice, we can also
send you a supply of "Mur~:s"--the shortened, enhanced vemion of our guidebook introduced in ~l~e
su=~t;~er of 2009. On tee S&S website you wLll als{~ find a one-page reformational handout that you
can do nload, print locally, and distribute widely. This publication is especially helpful at larger fairs
where representatives may distribute hundreds of handouts.
If you have ~i~r:her questions about College Fairs, please see Quick Reference for
Attending a College Fair on t m websirc under D,ac~mzen# a~d Pi)rms. This document contains a
how-co for aktending college fairs, as we[1 as answers questions that students frequently ask about
Ha~vard.
JOINT TRAVEL--EXPLORING COLLEGE OPTIONS
To respond to the increasingly early interest students, their parents, and guidance counselors
express in college admissions, the Admissions Committee is concentrating mo~e on spring
recruitment. Many more officers pxomote tla~ard to prospective applicants through a travel
alternative used in spring and fall: joint travel, known as Exploring College Options. A group of five
admissions representatives -representing ttarvard and four other colleges--travels to five cities in
five days, speaking in the evening wilh students and parents and in the morning with guidance
counselors. In the last several years, we have traveled with representatives from Duke, Georgetown,
10

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018530

DX025.0079

MIT, Stanford, the University of Pennsylvania, Princeton, University of Virginia, and Yale, among
others. The College enhances outreach through wel! planned ioint travel, which exposes the College
to a b~:oader audience--students, families, and schools--than individual school visits do.
Audiences hea~ about Harvard even as they t>ight have initially been a~trac~ed to attend the session
because o~ another collegeas presence. And by cooperating with other colleges in planning, we
enhance the cost-effectiveness of travel.
The admissions officer representing the College in any given joint travel visit mipoht not be
the officer assigmed to your area. The Admissions Com,nittee recognizes that a joint travel visi~
o~-ten provides the link ,a~ith Cambridge you need to back up you~ efforts on our behalf.
According to the guidelines established by the colleges cc~operaring in ioint travel~ only two
alumni/ae from each school may attend the evening session. While we hope you rmgbt be able to
recruil two of your Committee members to assist the Harvard area representative, you should also
confer with him or bet ({~r ~he office~ who will be traveling in his or her stead) about the possibiht7
of scheduling a meeting with you or even a group of your Cormanittee members. (Some groups
gather for an early dinner or a post event gathering.) Such a meetitqg can help you become be~te{:
acquainted with your staff representative and provide a chance to discuss concerns sad questions
your Schools Committee has about the admissions process.
ENCOURAGING ALUMNI/AE TO SERVE AS SCHOOL LIAISONS
As we rdy increasingly or: joint t~avel as the most efficien~ mevhod o~ reaching out to
prospective applicants and their families, and in light of the ~ecent budget reductions in the
Admissions OAPSfice, area representatives will ~ot be visiting individual schools as they have in the
past. This shi~t in recruitment strategy increases Ihe opportunity ~br alurnniiae to develop
relationships with local schools on our behalf. The Interviewer Handbook ou~es the methods by
which individual alumni!ae can intro&me themselves to local schools ~:nd explain the role they hope
~o play with college-bound secondsU school students. Schools Corranittee chairs play an important
role encouraging alumniiae to capitalize on this opportuniw and coordinating school assignments.
THE MORATORIUM
The I~w League colleges have agreed to honor a three-day period during which official
rep~esentativeAPS of colleges--including admissions officers, atumni/ae, and coaches---may not talk
with applicants. Designed is to give studen{s a respite d~aring which they may think about their
college choices without pressure from any number o f Jn ten sely intercs ted parties, this yearas
moratorium begins at 5 p.m. candidateas localtime two days before the ,-nailing date Wednesday,
March 27. It ends the day after dccxsions are mailed and e- mailed: Friday, March 30:8
candidaleas/oca~,a~7~e, it is your responsibiliv! to ensure that members of your Schools Committee are
aware of this rule and observe this courtesy to our applicants.
RECEPTIONS FOR STUDENTS
At the very least wc hope you and your interviewers will find the time to call to congratulate
ever~~ admitted student from your area. Some Schools Committees also host receptions taor admicmd
students before students must make their college decisions (May 1). You may also wish to in-Ate
students admitted in the Early Action process to Harvard Club sponsored holiday gatheri~ags or
other evcnts. You should be aware that the Admissions Office invites all admitted students to our
a,mual Visitas program ~or admttted students in April, which wilt be held from Saturday, April 21 to
Monday, April 23, 2012. Please rD" to hold your Schools Comnnittee ~eception before this event.
Receptions should be informal and include parents. They should focus on Harvard and
studentsa and their familiesa questions and concerns about at~et~ding the College. Pressure tactics
often backfire. One of the most effective recruiting tools is the conscientious avoidance of even

11

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018531

DX025.0080

slightly disparaging comments about other colleges. Here are some more practical suggestions on
setting the right tone at these receptions.
A- Alumni/at should call admitted students they interaviewed to invite them to attend such a
gathering. They should also try to attend these receptions. A second meeting can extend the
personal out~each that has pro,,en so successful to OUr recruitment efforts.
A- You and your interviewers ,:,,aill need to act quickly to invite students, some of whom nvght have
ahaea@ made up their nfinds by the time your recepnon takes place.
A- Be sure to check whether a student has access to transportation to the reception.
A- Be t-riendly and welcoming. Choose an easy-to-reach place, and create a relaxed atmosphere.
While it is not alxvays true that informal is better than formal, mauy veteran chairs have reported
that they have had better receptions with soda and pizza in a casual place than when they served
haute cuisine in a grand space.
A- Invite (if possible) current students and recent graduates to talk informally about the College. If
you ask some of these people to make individual presentations, keep them as brief as possible.
informal conversations allow the best oppormnity~ for alumni/at and current students to address
questions and concerns individual students and theJx families might have.
A- Avoid formal presentations about the College (there have been enough of those by this tired)
unless you are lucky enough to have a }~cuID" member in attendance who can talk aboul studies
or some other topic in depth with which students are not already familiar. The one opportunity
students might not have had in the college admissions process ~s thac of talldng ~vith a facuhy
member.
A- Be sure alumni/ae do not vastly on>number admitted students and farNlies, which can
overwhelm families.
Some students ~iI te~ you that they are hesitating about committing to Harvard because of
financial concerns. If there are questions about a studentas financial aid package, please t~cge the
smdem, as well as his or he= family, to contact the Financial Aid Office (617.495.1581) themselves.
Do not act as an intetwnediatw in a familyas discussions with the Financial Aid Office. Whtle such an
offer to help a iananly is land and often wdl intentioned, our financial aid off~{ ers will need to ask
families specific questions and talk over the financial aid package ,adth access co the studentas
complete financial aid application. Do not hesitate to show your ~nterest and support, but tell the
fi~nftly that zhe best and most efficient ~vay to ask for reconsideration of financial aid is to contact us
thcmselves.
NCAA roles regarding receptions and prospective student-athletes. As the Interviewer
Handbook states, you and your Schools Committee members are considered representatives of
Harvardas athletic interests just by being dumni/ae. This means that any contact you have with
c~trrent or prospective student-athletes at Harvard can affect the eligibility, of individual studentathlems and teams to competc m N C~%A_ and i~7 competition.
One of the mosI salient NCAA rules is that representatives of an institutionas athledc
interests are prohibited from having any contact with prospective student-athletes, who are also
known as "prospects." A prospect, moreover, is any student who has started classes for the ninth
grade. This means that recruiting any student who has started classes for the ninth grade is subject
ro NCAA rules.
There is a narrow exception to this role in the context of the standard process of college
admissions. That is, you and members of your Schools Committee will be assigned to interview
~tudents who are also athletes, and the member of your Committee assigned to interview the student
may contact him or her for these purposes, but for these purposes only. Schools Cc,nIxfittee
members may uot have contact w~th prospects whom they are not assigned to interview.

12

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018532

DX025.0081

These rules raise a number of issues pertaining to receptions as well. This brief batteQ" of
questions and answers sh~mld inform your Schools Committee activity in regard to student-athletes
and receptions.
May an alumnuaj a hold an annual ,w~p~ion o~ly~r a~hletes at ~he request q/aa coazh? No, whether or
not the coach is inw~ived. All receptions should be conducted in accordance vdth existing
institutional policy. Alurnni/ae mW nothold coach o~:chestrated receptions. All receptions
must be open to all prospective applicants and students from your area, athletes and nonathletes.
May a coach give a list of allpros~ects in an area lo the Sehook Commi~ee member w,~o ~vall h~a~ a
Committee reception? Yes. The list must be incorporated into a larger list of all area prospects,
and invitations (and the ttrnlng of those invitations) to prospects and non-athletes must be
identical. The list tnay not be devised by starting with the list of prospects, and then only
inviting applicants from their high schools. All applicants who live within a uniform radius
of the evet~t should be invited.
Is ilpe~d~sible for the c,a~.b ,a, send to thej)rospeclr the inflations ~o /his alumni/ae rec~o~? No. The
coach mW urge that the prospects attend in any otherwise pen:~ssible correspondence, but
im, itations mus~ be offered through regular Schools Co~Nttee chmmels.
M~9, ah~mni/ ae eall~,v~ect~ and encourage/hem to a#e~ad t~e rec~tion? No. Alumni/ae, inclu~ng
alumni!ae who are members of the Schools Corn*rotter, may vevaer telcphone a prospect
un/ea~ it is ~ecOy associated with t~is or her a&~ssions inte~iew or sim[Iar pa~t of the
ad~ssions process. Invitations ~o receptions should be in w~itmg o~ via email.
Mq~ the univerJitjas coach attend the t~@l~a? Yes. Provided the recepdon fa~s within a
per~ssible contact petfiod for ~e coachas sport and is counted as one of the ttatee
pen~ssible contacts [~r atlathletes in attendance whom the school is recruiting in any sport.
Mqy h~h schoo/ coaches be in~ited t~ attend lhe mc~ptioa? No. High school coaches may neverbe
entertained off campus by alumniiae o~ coaches.
M~ ~a~nts qfpm~ects be invited to attend ~he reception? Yes, though only on the ;ame basis as all
parents of a//app~cants invited. If parents of p~ospects a~e not charged a fee, then parents
of all applicants should not be ch~ged a fee.
~I~a a~gumni/ ae s~eak to ~ects at the reception even ~thg are voz member~ ~ the Schooa Cammittee,
which rc~resen# admis:mns? Yes. At events open to a~ appkcants, prospects need not be
treated any differenOy ttaan othe~ applicants.

IVY LEAGUE EARLY NOTIFICATION PROGRAM

As determined by each instit-ation, admissions off?ces may advise applicants before dm
common notification date, in writing, of the probability of admission (e.g. kikely, possible,
unlikdy). If the student is a recruited ~tudent-athlete, suet: notifications may only be made from
October 1 through March 15, per Iv?- League regulations.
Institutions may issue official "probabilistic" communications only in wridng, from the
office of admission. Such letters will have i!~e effect of letters of admission, to be confirmed on
the common notification date (in December for Early Action candidates and in March for
Regular Decision candidates), subject ~o revocation only on the same terms as letters of
admission. (Such commumcations g~ven by coaches, whether orally or in writing, do not
constitute binding institutional commitments.) An applicant who receives one or more such
written communications and who has made a decision to matriculate at one lnst~tution is
t3

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018533

DX025.0082

encoaraged (but not required) to not~f7 all other institutions, and to wid~draw all other
applications, as promp@ as possible.
Such early evaluations are often precipitated by pressure on smden>ath[etes from otlner
institutions requiring an early comcmitment. In some instances, students are given veU little thne
to respond to these offers. Such candidates bring exccllences of al! kinds in addition to atEletics,
m~d the Admissions Committee can vote to noti~, tlaem that they are likely to be admitted rather tlnan lose them to other institutions. Alumni/ae Schools and Scbolarsh*p Chairs will be
in~om~ed about such candidates by the staff area person and ~11 be requested to interview them
if time allows.

14

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018534

DX025.0083

4. MANAGING INTERVIEW ASSIGNMENTS

The prs-nau work of Schools Comrmttees is to offer personal interviews to applicants to the
College. Any organizational structure and process that helps your Schools Committee conduct
interviews and send to Cambridge timely reports suits us.

WHEN DO WE NEED INTERVIEW REPORTS?

"i~e Admissions Comrmttee benefits enormously from reports that help reform our
decisions. The value of these reports depends on their time,hess. Given the large number of
applications in recent years and the adtr~tedly compressed timing for filing interviews for all these
candidates, we ot~t~er these considerations to inform you when your Schools Committeeas interview
reports are most critical to our xvork in Cambridge.
Alumni!ae insights are most valuab[e if we have them for subcommittee--a caseas first
hearing. We would, of course, love to read interview reports as we first re~d applicantsa files. But
many students still ~vait to apply by the final deadline, making it virtually linpossible for tkeir repo~ s
to be hem for a folderas first read. a[ahe committee process works best and most efficiently, then,
when we have reports for subcommittee. Subcommittees begin meeting i~a mid-November for Early
Actiou candidates and for three- to tour-day shifts from late January through February for Regular
Decision candidates. Occasionally, applicantsa files complete as late as Feb~uaU. This results, most
often, from unavoidable logistical factors.
The lasa opportuni~" for the vast majority of cases to be heard is during full Comrmttee. The
Admissions Committee must have all intetwiew reports in hand for full Conm~ittee. The entire
Committee convenes in one room to review a]l the contenders for admission. Many candida:cs are
re-pxesented in fult Cot~m~ittee, which again may consider a single case for a haJf bout ~,: more. Full
Committee generally meets in the first week of December for Early Action and ~arom the end of the
first week of NAPS~rch to the end of the khitd week of March ~or Regular Decision:
INTERVIEW PROFILE NUMBER

In some areas, the increase of applicants we have seen in recent years has necessitated the
development of new tools and processes to manage incoming requrests, in an effort to dde S&S
Chairs burdened by an increasing demand for interviews, we have developed the Interview Profile
Number (IVP) system, which may be implemented at the discretion of the local S&S Chair and the
correspondang adrmssions ~epresentauve. Interviewers vAll not see the IVP of a candidate.
Admissions officers have the option to assign an applicant an intervie~v profile of 1, 2, 3, or
4. The numbers correspond as listed betow:
i - Please have interviexv report in as soon as possible.
2 - Please have interview report in by the sub-comm tree deadline.
3 - Please have interriew report in by December 1 @A) or March 1 (RID).
4 - No additional information needed at this time.
ASSIGNING INTERVIEWS

Interviewing Requests. Please refer to the S&S ebsiteas instructions, which ate updated
each year and during the year w~tb important changes, for instructions about assigning intelrviews
using tbe siteas assigning functiop, This f~mction replaces the e-mail fists sent to chairs in previous
years.

15

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018535

DX025.0084

Ensuring alumni!ae interview a sufficient number of applicants. You should talk with
each Schools Comrni tee member about his or her i~lterviewing availability." e.g., in which areas he
or she would prefer to inte~qew applicants, when, and how many--before he or she commits to
interviewing. The Admissions Comn~ttee appreciates the effort it takes to inte,~iew even a single
applicant. Yet, the Committee believes that alumniiae offer more valuable assessments of
applicants if they interview between four and six students---as a minimum, ideal range--in a given
admissions season. This can expand interviewersa perspective of individual candidates, the applicant
pool, and the admissions process.
While ihe Admissions Committee prefers that every alumnus/a who interviews meets xvith
between four and six students in a given admissions season, ~ve understand that you will occasionally
need ~o fill interview assigmment gaps with ad hoc interviewe:s when re.ore active interviewers are
away on business, vacationing, ill, or even incommunicado.
"Matching" applicants with interviewers, qlhe Admissious Committee recommends
assigning intervie~vs on the most pragmatic and efficient basis possible. Where does the applicant
live or go to school relative to where interviewers live? How many interviews has a particular
alumnusia conducted and do they have time fo: another? These answers to these questions, above
all else, should inform how you assign intervie~vs. The assignmm:t feature of the website does not
peru.fit cliairs to see an applicantas extracurricular interests, which of course prevents chairs fi:orn
assigning interviewers candidates based on thcse interests.
The Admissions Committee :ecomrnends against a conscious policy of matching inteiwiewers
and applicants by race or ethniciw, shouid the interviewer happen to know an applicantas race or
ethnicity. Some applicants have reported ~o us that they felt as if they were being "specially
screened" by meeting with an alumnus/a of similar ethnicity, and d~at their racial identity--more
than their academic achieverncnts, extracurricular passions, and personal qualities--was under
scrutiny. "Matches" will occur in the normal process of assigning interviews, however, and s~ch
assi~ments should be allowed to proceed.
Ensuring interviews have been completed. As you might recall from the lnterviexver
Handbook, we e*~c~urage all alumni/ae to keep one copy of each of their interview :eports for their
records, to send a second copy to you, and a thJxd copy to the Adnfissions Office. We encourage
akunni/ae to keep one copy themseNes in case we need to contact them for a duplicate or so that
they might be able to refer to their rel~orts should the area representative have ~.dditional questions
ablaut the interview. The Admission2 Committee encourages them to provide you a copy for the
same reasons_ More importantly, the copy you receis, e might ser,~e as the best notice that an
a!umnus/a has completed an interview assigmment.
Alumni/ae \~AC/aeb Portal enhancements. As usual, we are constantly working ~o improve
and cnhance the web services available to chairs and interviewers- We hope you will take the time to
explore the updates as well as let us knoxv if you have any suggestions for the future.
Please log in t{~ d~e site using your c~Jrrcnt access code (PIN) and become familiar with the
site. It-you donat remember your access code, plcase use the "Forget your Access Code?a= link on
the logm page in order to have the code sent to your emall address on record. As you navigate the
site you can be assured that you cannot break any{hing or accidentally ddete yourself. Please find
the site at:
https://admapp.admissions.fas.harvard.edu/hanevo/alumni/haService sadAdeg

Please begin by reviewing your prone and edit the contact itaformation accordingly. If you
have mo~e than one email address, we would encourage you to use your post.harvard.edu address..
Please note that the site bears similarities with its predecessor, but is considerably different given tts
services and [-unctions. Should you have questions about the siteas functionality or suggestions for

16

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018536

DX025.0085

its improvement, you should first contact Elizabeth Adams, SSinfo~,t;as.harvard.edu, wirl~pestions.
You may also contact your local area representative.
Some volunteers object to submitting reports to area chairs and thus (it might so be
perceived) subjecting tt:em to "checking." If anyone r~,ises this concern with you, you can point out
that reports are going to be read by a fair number of people on the Adiaaissions Committee, often
including members of the {~cu[V, and that they should therefore be writte*~, even wkcn negative in
content, in a pzofession~d manner.
Rem2nd alumni/ae that, t-or their own sake and for the sake of meeting Com~ttee deadli~ms
promptly, they need not feel pressured ~o polish the prose of a report on a candidi~te with whom
:hey have been very impressed. We are far more concerned witI~ the content of reports--and their
judgments--than their style.
Despite your pleas, some inte~-vqc;vers will forget to let you know they ~re vacationing, away
on business, or ill, which can often result in reports languishing for two to three weeks. Should you
not hear irom rateraviewers or see interaview reports for that length of time after assigni~g them, you
slnould follow-up xvith the appropriate alumnus!a and, if necessary., re-assign the interview.

RANKING MEETINGS

After completing all the seasonas intervie~qng, some Schools Comt>iltees hold ranking
meetings to compare the qualifications of local candidates. Cornparing candidates wit}~iu a Schoo~.s
Committee gives alurrmi/ae a reason~ble approximation of the Committee process in Cambridge. If
the Schools Committee applies roughly the same standard of selectivity as ~he Admissions
Co~unittee, alumni/at can better understand the strengths necessary fox candidates to make it
successfi~lly through the admisszons process. Ahimni!ae also have the opportm~ity to temper their
own judgments of candidates when :hey hear how ott~er alumni/ae have evahiated other students.
Ranldngs of candidates are valuable to area representatives in Cambridge for the inp~tt they
provide and to Schools Committee members for the inforn~ation they share. Any Schools
Committee member ~vho has had a greater than usual share of either stroug o~ weak apphcants for
the year can als~ pu~ }ds or her own interviewees in perspective and understand better the decisions
ma~e in Cambridge. Ranking meetings also provide valuable exposure for new interviewers.
Holding a ranking meeting requires considerable time and effort. Recommendations from
ranking meetings are most valuable if eveU applicant from a given area is interviewed, if all
interviewers have the oppo~:tunity to introduce any candidate for the Schools Committeeas
consideration, ;rod if all ~f t)~is work can be completed b~*a~ subcomrmttee meetings in Cambridge.
Ran~ng meetings can provide the Admissions Committee additional perspective on
candidates. Almnniiae should keep in mind that recomnmndations Schools Committees make for
candidates after a 60-minute intera~qexv and ranNng meeting discussions are additional elements that
the Committee weighs in the context of all other information in an applicautas file in Cambridge.
Suggestions for the meeting. Should you ho~_d a ranidng meeting, use wh,qtever fore, at
suits your Schools Committee best (e.g., by area, by subcommittee chairs, etc.). However yo~
choose to structure t!~e meeting, you should approach the ranking meeting in a fast, ion similar to the
Committee process described in the Interviewer Handbook, indicating which canc~da tes received
the strongest support, etc., from your Schools Committee. Do not split h.qirs over numerical ratings
as the strongest dete~:minams fbr where you should rank candidates. As the Inter~aiewer Handbook
states, the Adiniss~ons Committee does not expect to achieve anything approaching national
consistency with the ta,se ofnumerical ratings, so we use them in the mos~ general waay ~.o show
whether an interview was favorable or unfavorable.

17

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018537

DX025.0086

It is just as important to indicate to your area representative which candidates ~eceived
strong majority support as it ~s to ,nchcate which candidates received strong support from a ~ninori~y
o~" the Schools Committee. This information can be useful to the Admissions Committee. And
representing strong interest f-~orn a minority of Committee members appreciates the ha~d work they
did throughout the year and can reduce possible friction over whose ca*~didates won the most votes.

Transfer Interviewing

As a Schools Committee chairperson, you might be asked to acrange an inte~-,*ic~v for a few
transfer applicants in March or April. Unlike interviewing for freshman admission, we do not
request an interview unless we have determined, from reading the application, that the stude~t has ~
vm-y reasonable chance of admission.

18

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa

HARV00018538

EYES ONLY

DX025.0087

CONFIDENTIAL

HARV00018539

DX025.0088

STANDING COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS AND FINANCIAL AID IN
HARVARD COLLEGE
2011-2012

The Standing Committeeon Admissions and Financial Aid in Harvard College has responsibilityto
oversee the admission of students to the College and the administrationof the financial aid program which,
recent years, has provided support tbr seventy percent of undergraduates.
Colnmittee members are appointed by the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and mL~st be
me~nbers of the Faculty. The Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid has traditionally been appointed chaimmn
of the Committee by the Dean of the Facultya.
In practice, the Committee serves a variety of functions, but basic to its efforts is the determination of
admissions and financial aid policy. In fact, policy is often derived from practice by the manner in whida the
Commi~eevotes admission or rejection to the applicants, lahe decision to admit a stndent with one set of
characteristics over a second applicant with mher characteristicscreatcs adlnissbns policy. In addition, the
members of the Committee serve as interpreters of the admissions policy to the Faculty at large and in turn
bring faculty opinion to the Committee. Members are chosen from each of the three broad areas ofschola,shlp
and represent as well such student-sensitive positions as Masterships, the Freshman Deaffs Office and athletics.
Few faculty members are able steadilyto devote large amounts of time to the Committeeaswork. The
process of representing, recruiting, evaluating, and admitting applicants and determiningtheir financial aid is
an extraordinarilymaduous and time-consumingtask. The day to day operation, therefore, has been carried on
largely by the fl~]l-time admissions start; Althongh it is efficient, this arrangement is far from ideal. The
recruitment of members of the Faculty who will be able and willing to spend significant time with the
Commi~eeoperation is as necessaryto the health of the Committeeas a successful admissions operation is to
the health of the Harvard community. The Committee t~nds itself obliged to won with multiple constituencies:
faculty membersAdeg applicants, their teachers, parents, undergraduates, alumni!ae, and government and various
special interest groups. The Co~nmittee operates best when its collective membership can relate to all these
constituencies.
Finally, it sho.uld be noted ~vith pride that the Cammitteehas a long tradition of independence flaom
iuappropriate pressures. Decisions have always been made solely by the Committee No one from the OfIice
of the President, the Alumni Ol~ice, or anywhere else inside or outside the University has pre-empted the
Faculty Committeeasresponsibilityto vote every case. The Hmward admissions operation stands unique in both
its vitality and its independence. Without the Faculty Committeeas active participation neither would be
possible.
Revised by MEM
18 October 2004

CONFIDENTIAL

HARV00018540

DX025.0089

E

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018541

DX025.0090

Reading Procedures, Class of 2016
UPDATE PROCEDURES
FIRST READERS are expected to verify that the information on the Summary Sheet
matches the information supplied by the candidate on the application, paying particular
attention to the items highlighted below. If any information is missing or incorrect,
changes should be made using the UPDATE/PROFILE sheet provided in the folder
(sample attached) and noted in the appropriate places on the Summary Sheet. One
exception: School code changes must be made by PDF/KAH (and NOT on the
UPDATE/PROFILE sheet).
From now on we will report exactly what the applicant reports as ethnicity on the
application. Readers should update information regarding Ethnic Codes
only if ethnicity is checked on the application, but not recorded on the
computer.
The following list of our existing historical codes is for your reference:
A - Asian American
NH - Native Hawaiian
B - Black/African American
NA - Native American
H - Mexican American
O - Other
14 - Hispanic (not clearly "M" or
P - Puerto Rican
"P")
W - White/Caucasian
In addition to these previous ethnic categories, the following codes follow the new
government reporting guidelines:
A- Hispanic or Latino
XCM-Central America, CUB-Cuba, MEX- Mexico, PRI - Puerto Rico, XSH South America, ESP-Spain, XOH-Other
A- American Indian orAiaska Native
XAN-Alaska Native, XCW-Chippewa, XCH- Choctaw, XCK-Cherokee,
XNV-Navajo, XSX - Sioux, XON -Other
A- Asian
CHN - China, IND-India, .1PN-Japan, KOR-Korea, PAK-Pakistan,
PHL- Philippines, VNM- Vietnam, XEA - Other East Asia,
XIS -Other Indian Subcontinent, XSA - Other Southeast Asia
A- Blackor African American
XAA - U.S./African American, XAF - Africa, XCB - Caribbean, XOA - Other
A- Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander
GUM-Guam, XHI-Hawaii, ASM- Samoa, XOP-Other
Pacific Islands (excluding Philippines )
A- White Options
XEU -Europe, XME- Middle East XOW - Other

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018542

DX025.0091

Note that foreign citizens are listed as such, (without an ethnic code,) no
matter what they have checked on the application,
In short, the ethnic codes on the Summary Sheet will come from:
- Demographic fields the candidate checked on the application
- Information the student supplied when registering for College Board tests

CITIZENSHIP CODE / COUNTRY OF CITIZENSHIP: Please verify the
citizenship code and country of citizenship for each applicant. There are four
options on the application that can be checked: (I) U.S. Citizenship, (2) U,S. Dual
Citizenship, (3) U.S. permanent resident and ([4) "Other" OF foreign citizen.
The applicant holds only American citizenship.
APP, The box "U,S citizen" is checked with no other country of citizenship listed.
SUMMARYSHEER Should read "CI-I-Z: United States of America"

The applicant is a dual U.S. citizen, (a citizen of both the U.S. and another country).
APP. The box "U.S.idual U.S. citizen" is checked with another country listed to the
right.
SUMMARYSHEER. Should read "CITZ: United States/<other country>"
The applicant is a U.S. Permanent Resident.
APP, The box "U.S, Permanent Resident" is checked with another country listed.
SUMMARYSHEE-R.

Should read "Ci-TZ: PERN RES/<other country>"

Caveat. If an applicant has checked the U.S. Permanent Resident box but notes
that his or her application for permanent residency (or "green carda~ is pending, that
applicant should be recoded as "Other citizenship." We must prepare an 1-20 form if
the applicant is admitted and the application for residency is still pending, and the
citizenship code is the only way we know to do this.
The applicant is a foreiqn citizen.
APP. The box "Other citizenship" is checked with a foreign country listed to the right.
SUMMARYSHEER.

Should read"CITZ:

<other country>"

PLEASE NOTE: The accuracy of our citizenship coding is CRUCIAL. Miscoding
affects many of the important statistics we are required to compile (including
ethnicity), and we need to keep careful track of who needs a visa to study in the

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL

i

ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018543

DX025.0092

United States.

SCHOOL CODE: If an applicant is coded to the wrong school, please fill out a
school code update form and leave the form, along with the folder, in the school
code update basket located in the fileroom annex. If the student needs to be read
by the chair, first readers should pass the folder on to the chair along with the
school code update form, so that the student will be coded out in a timely fashion
and the chair will know to submit the folder for recoding. If the required recoding
alters the docket and first reader assignment, please turn the folder in immediately
and indicate that fact on the school code update form, so that the operations team
can ensure that the interview is reassigned to the appropriate club and group and
the folder is passed along to the appropriate reader.
SEX: Occasionally the gender designation reported on the Common Application is
coded incorrectly in our system. Such a coding error should be corrected. Please
note that gender coding is optional and in the case of an applicant who does not
designate a gender on the Common Application, any previous gender designation by
that applicant (on tests, etc.) will override a blank gender designation.
COMMUTER: Readers should use "C" (commuter) or "R" (resident),

LINEAGE: Folders are occasionally coded incorrectly. Use the UPDATE/PROFILE
sheet to change parentsa college and/or graduate school. In the case of an HiR
College son or daughter, the folder should be read by WRF, following the normal
reading process, if the decision might require special handling or if another reading
might be helpful.
FACULTY, STAFF: Code ONLY children of professors at the Faculty of Arts and
Sciences as an "F"; children of faculty from other parts of the University as well as
children of administrative Staff should be coded "S" on the UPDATE/PROFILE sheet,
Please be careful to apply faculty and staff coding where appropriate as
we need to keep accurate statistics on these applicants. All "F" and "S"
folders should be sent to WRF after the normal reading process has been
completed.
ACCESSIBLE EDUCATION OFFICE (AEO) REFERRALS: Code all applicants who
may require special accommodations due to disabilities or special needs with the
AEO flag on the UPDATE/PROFILE sheet. We can then provide a list to assist the
AEO and FDO in providing accommodations when appropriate,
ATHLETE: Use the number "7" to alert coaches to an athlete with potential Lo play
for Harvard. Be sure the appropriate sport is listed as the first extracurricular
activity. DO NOT CHANGE ANY PRE-CODED ATHLETE.

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018544

DX025.0093

SCORES: We hope to relieve readers from having to update the scores of any
applicant. Applicants will know by checking the website which scores are in our
files. They can report scores (which will be marked aunofficiala) as they like. By the
time you are reading, we hope the vast majority of applicants will have checked the
website and updated tests. They will be reminded to do so in the acknowledgement
letter.
You can check scores by logging in to the alum portal:
https:/iadmapp.admissions.fas.harvard.edu/hanevo/alumni-loginHA.do?fp
Once on the welcome page, you will find a link, (located on the left frame) named
"Find Applicants." When chosena the link takes you to the FAS PIN system Iogin
page where you wil! enter your HUID and FAS PIN. Once your HUfD is validated,
you will be routed to a search page, allowing you to search for applicants, displaying
the results in commiEee screen fashion. Scores are available beneath the searched
applicant.
You should almost never need to update scores. If you do, they will merely be
another set of unofficial tests. Applicants are on notice that they are responsible for
changing aunofficiala to aofficial,a which they can only do by getting scores sent by
CEEB/ACT. Paper copies of scores sent via fax, email attachment or U.S. mail are not
considered official.
If, however, you have a case with no scores on the reader sheet that you
feel is worth committee discussion, enter the scores as unofficial on the
UPDATE/PROFILE sheet. If the scores appear on the transcript, bring the
folder to KAH who will be able to note them, mark them as unofficialr and
verify them later.
We receive secure web downloads of scores, so we do not have to wait for the
scores to be mailed to us. Applicants are told not to use ~arush reports,a but if they
do, they will arrive electronically as soon as they are scored.
FERPA-"
.This year we will be importing the applicantas FERPA selection as indicated on the
Secondary School Report (SSR), alleviating the need for readers to record the FERPA
selection. The import is intended to capture all online submitted SSR FERPA
selections. A final spot-check on the admitted class (waitlist and deferred included)
will then be performed, updating applicant files as needed.

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018545

DX025.0094

II.
CODING GUIDELINES FOR SUMMARY SHEETS
All readers must code a preliminary overall rating, a profile, the school support, and the
interview(s) (using the codes below and pluses and minuses). Writing prose comments
is left to the discretion of the reader.
Overall
1. Tops for admission: Exceptional - a clear admit with very strong objective and
subjective support (90+% admission).
2. Strong credentials but not quite tops (50-90% admission).
3. Solid contender: An applicant with good credentials and suppor~ (20-40%
admission).
4. Neutral: Respectable credentials.
5. Negative: Credentials are generally below those of other candidates.
6. Unread.
First readers should code "threes" (and "fours" if they wish on occasion) as follows:
3+=673: Someone for whom late information could easily lead to admission
3 =683: Standard strong, but could be admitted if substantial new info elevates the
case.
3-=693: Solid but would need unusually strong new information to make it.
4+=x74:
Etc.
X=6 if coded out by the first reader, otherwise it is the third readeras rating. The 7,8,9
rating can be used by the first or third reader, the latteras reading superseding that of
the first reader. No overall ratings should be changed in the meetings, but others may
be updated.
Academic
1. Summa potential. Genuine scholar; near-perfect scores and grades (in most
cases) combined with unusual creativity and possible evidence of original
scholarship.
2. Nagna potential: Excellent student with superb grades and mid-to high-700
scores (33+ ACT).
3. Cum laude potential: Very good student with excellent grades and mid-600 to
low-700 scores (29 to 32 ACT).
4. Adequate preparation. Respectable grades and low-to mid-600 scores (26 to 29)
ACT).
5. Marginal potential. Modest grades and 500 scores (25 and below ACT),
6. Achievement or motivation marginal or worse.
Extracurricular, Community Employment, Family Commitments

HZGHLY CONFZDENTZAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018546

DX025.0095

1. Unusual strength in one or more areas. Possible national-level achievement or
professional experience. A potential major contributor at Harvard. Truly unusual
achievement.
2. Strong secondary school contribution in one or more areas such as class
president, newspaper editor, etc. Local or regional recognition; major
accomplishment(s).
3. Solid participation but without special distinction. (Upgrade 3+ to 2- in some
cases if the e/c is particularly extensive and substantive.)
4. Little or no participation.
5. Substantial activity outside of conventional EC participation such as family
commitments or term-time work (could be included with other e/c to boost the
rating or left as a "5" if it is more representative of the studentas commitment).
6. Special circumstances limit or prevent participation (e.g. a physical condition).
Athletic
1. Unusually strong prospect for varsity sports at Harvard, desired by Harvard
coache&
2. Strong secondary school contribution in one or more areas; possible leadership
role(s).
3. Active participation.
4. Little or no interest.
5. Substantial activity outside of conventional EC participation such as family
commitments or term-time work (could be included with other e/c to boost the
rating or left as a "5" if it is more representative of the studentas commitment).
6. Physical condition prevents significant activity.
Personal
1. Outstanding.
2. Very strong.
3. Generally positive.
4. Bland or somewhat negative or immature.
5. Questionable personal qualities.
6. Worrisome personal qualities.
School Support
1. Strikingly unusbal support. aqahe best ever," "one of the best in x years," truly
over the top.
2. Very strong support. "One of the best" or "the best this year.

3. Above average positive support.
4.
5.
6.
9.

Somewhat neutral or slightly negative.
Negative or worrisome report.
Neither the transcript nor prose is in the folder.
Transcript only. No SSR prose.

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018547

DX025.0096

PLEASE NOTE: Support is coded teacher one, teacher two, then counselor. Teacher
three and teacher four are optional, if applicable.
,
GPA and GPA Scale:
The Academic Index is now calculated using GPA and GPA Scale. Therefore, the area
person must provide a GPA AND GPA Scale for each applicant. These will be converted
automatically to the 20 to 80 scale in NEVO.
Here are the rules according to the AI instructions:
GPAs qenerally: The secondary school GPA should be taken as presented on the
secondary school transcript; when both unweighted and weighted GPAs are
presented, the unweighted GPA should be used. (Tf there is a question as to
whether the school is using an unweighted or weighted system, the scale should be
defined as unweighted, based on what the A grade earns in a regular course.)
GPA scales and conversions from Table II: Table II, the "CGS General
Conversion Table" (formerly Table I:II, the values are unchanged), should be used
for the GPA scales shown (100-points, 11.0/12.0, 7.0, 6.0, 4.0, A-D) even if the
transcript or secondary school profile provides a conversion to a Table ]7 scale.
"Hi~jh" GPA systems: Although some secondary school transcripts show that
GPAs may be routinely higher than the nominal highest grade on the scale, it is
difficult to generalize about these practices. For example, especially with regard to
schools that use 4.0 scales, there are high schools in which a high percentage of
GPAs may be above 4.0 but also schools in which the highest GPA achieved is
routinely far below 4.0. For 2011-12, Table II will continue to provide, based on
experience across the league to date, that for some scales the highest nominal GPA
will have a CGS below 80 and for others a CGS of 80 will begin at the highest
nominal GPA.
Scales not provided on Table II: Given the relatively small number of admitted
and matriculated students for whom Table II scales are not provided, it is preferable
not to create new scales if possible. Tn such cases, a GPA on a 4.0 scale should be
calculated using the following formula, and a CGS then derived using the 4.0 scale
on Table II: HSGPA/HSGPA scale = "x"/4.0, where "x" becomes the value from
which the CGS is derived. For example, if on a 5.0 scale a student has a 4.8 GPA
(whether the scaleas top grade is A or A+), the formula is 4.8/5.0 = x/4.0. X=3.84
and the CGS = 73.
This calculation will be done automatically in IVEVO when you provide the
GPA and GPA Scale used by the school.

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL

i

ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018548

DX025.0097

Calculatincl GPA when not provided by the secondary school: When the
secondary school does not calculate/report a GPA, the institution should calculate an
unweighted GPA based on the secondary schoolas grading scale, using all courses for
which grades and credit hours are provided, and weighting semester grades as onehalf full-year grades. Enter the GPA and GPA Scale on the update/profile
sheet.

=

=

GPA period: GPA data always should be for more than one year, including 10th and
11th grades, 9th grade when available, and official trimester or semester grades (as
opposed to midterm grades) in the studentas current year if available at the time the
decision is made. If "official" grades from the current year are available but are not
counted in the schoolas cumulative GPA, they should be added to the cumulative
GPA and weighted appropriately: e.g., grades for first semester or trimester of
senior year would be weighted as one-half or one-third year, respectively.*
GPAs from multiple schools and repeat years: When a student has a~ended
multiple secondary schools (including a post-graduate year), all GPAs provided by
the schools should be used to the extent possible (see #5 above when a school has
not provided a GPA) and weighted as in #6 above. [f Lhe institution believes this
result is not logical and fair, it should describe what approach it believes is better,
subject to the ]W League Admissions Committeeas agreement.
For applicants from Canada; For a Canadian GPA where the passing grade is
50%, add 15 points to the academic average before determining the CGS. If the
passing grade is 60% add :10 points. If the passing grade is 70%, add nothing.
Please add the extra points to the GPA before entering the results on the
update/profile sheet - ie.. for a GPA of 86 where 50% is passing, 101
should be entered in GPA.

9, Follow the procedures listed below for A~[ calculations for students from schools that
do not follow the American curricular system.
"International School" AI calculations
For all national curricula, unless specified otherwise elsewhere, include all courses as
part of the GPA calculations.
6enerallAY=; Except as provided here, each school should calculate GPAs from
international schools as it seems most appropriate; such calculations then should be
~ When institutions calculate "final" all-class AI data for full admit cohorts in the spring and
matriculant cohorts in the fall, athletesa AIs should be calculated in the same manner as nonathletesa AIs so that all AIs in the cohort data are calculated identically. The athleteas
individually reported AI will continue to be the AI used at the time s/he received a likely or
admissions decision, unless later testing or GPA information raised the AI (see E-8 below),

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018549

DX025.0098

reviewed during the spring meetings to determine what standardization might be
agreed on., Institutions are encouraged to circulate questions during the year to
determine what other institutions are doing and if a consensus exists that could or
should be followed.
International Baccalaureate Systems:
Use the following equivalents to calculate a GPA:
7 = A+ = 4.3
6 =A=4.0
5=B=3.0
4=C=2.0
3=D=1.0
A-
A-
A-

A-

If the applicant is taking a gap year, actual two,year IB results are used.
In the absence of final marks, use predicted marks. If predicted marks are not
available, use internal grades.
For IB schools in the U.S., use the course values given on the transcript; for ]B
schools outside the U.S., double the weight for Higher Level courses as opposed
to the Standard Level courses.
Use the same standards for "domestic" applicants as to "academic" versus "all"
courses.

British systems:
Count all GCSE (= O Level), AS and A level results in order to calculate a GPA:
A* (same as A+) = 4.3
A= 4.0
B= 3.0
C=2.0
D= 1.0
A-
A-
A-
A-

If the applicant is taking a gap year, actual A-Level results should be used.
A Level grades are given double the weight of AS and GCSE grades.
Internal grades are usually not available and should not be used if they are.
In the absence of final marks, predicted A-Level grades should be used when
available.

Pre-U Proqram (New British System)
Use only Principal Subjects with the following conversions for British Pre-U
programs:
D1 = A+/4.3
D2 = A+/4.3
D3 = A/4.0
Mt = B+/3.3

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa

HARVO0018550

EYES ONLY

DX025.0099

M2

=

BI3IO

M3 = B-/2.7
P1 = C-/1.7
P2 = D/!.0
P3 = D-/0.7
4. Singapore schools followinq standard 3C qradinq conventions
Include H1 (GP, Project, etc.) & H2 predictions on a 4.0 scale to calculate GPA.
Double weight for H2 marks. For H3, the scale is:
A-
A-
A-

Distinction = A/4.0
Merit = B/3.0
Pass = C/2.0

Double H3s as well. If provided, include O Level/GCSE marks in calculation of GPA with
a single weight like we do with the British System.
5. Australia
Push schools for a transcript of some sort. If all else fails and you are given the state
final exam result or prediction (ex: UAI for NSW, OP for Queensland), use that.
6. New Zealand
For courses in which there is the possibility to get more than a grade of Achieved:
A-
A-
A-
A-

Excellent = A/4.0
Merit = B/3.0
Achieved = C/2.0
Not Achieved = F/0

For courses graded only Achieved/Not Achieved, we will consider these the same as
Pass/Fail, so a mark of Achieved will not be included when calculating GPA.

TABLE II : Used for calculating Converted Gradepoint Score (CGS)

Letter Grade
Equivalent

11.011 2.0
Scale
Average
l~00and

7.0 Scale
Average

6.0 Scale
Average

4.0 Scale

97.00-97.99

11.70-11,99

6170 - 6.99

5.70 - 5.99

4.20 -4.29

79

96.00- 96.99

11.40- 11.69

6,40- 6.69

5.40- 5,69

4.10-4.19

78

Percentage
Average
;~800~d,-

]0

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018551

DX025.0100

94.00 - 94.99

10.70 - 10.99,

93.00 - 93.99

10.40 - 10.69

92.00 ~
91.00 90.00 89.00 -

t ~;~0 :- :i0i~9:
9.80 - 9,99
9.50 - 9,79

75

4.90- 4.99

3.90- 3.99

4.80- 4.89

3.80- 3.89

4,60 - 4.69
4.50 - 4,59

9.30 - 9.49

5.60 - 5.69
5.50 - 5.59
5.40 - 5.49

4.40 - 4,49

3:76
3,60
3.50
3,40

86.00-86.99

8.70 - 8,99
8.40-8.69

5.20 - 5.29
5.10- 5_19

4,20 - 4,29
4.10-4.19

3,20 - 3,29
3,10-3,19

65

81.00 - 81,99
80.00 - 80.99

6.75 - 6,99
6.50 - 6.74

4.60 - 4.69
4,50 - 4.59

3.60 - 3.69

79.00 - 79.99

6,25 - 6.49

4.40 - 4.49

3.40 - 3.49

2,60 - 2.69
2.50 - 2.59
2.40 - 2.49

55
53
51

77,00 - 77.99

570- 5.99
5.40-5.69

4.20- 4.29
4JQ - 4,~9

3.20- 3,29
3.~Q-3.~9

2.20- 2.29

48

76.00 - 76.99

2JO - 2.~9

47

74,00 - 74.99
73.00 - 73.99

4.70 - 4.99

3.90 - 3.99
3.80 - 3.89

2.90 - 2.99

1.90 - 1.99

45

4.40 - 4.69

2.80 - 2.89

1.80 - 1.89

44

71.00 - 71.99
70.00 - 70.99

3.5 - 3.99
2.5 - 3.49

260 - 2.69
2,50 - 2.59

1.50 - 1.59

D+

40
38

Below 70.00

Below 2.5

Below 2.5

Below 1.50

D

35

92:9~
91.99
APS0.99
89.99

87.00 - 87.99

5,90- 5,99
5.80- 5.89

3.60. - 3.69
3.50 - 3.59
Below 3.5

3.50 - 3.59

~
-

73
:

~;79
3.69
3.59
3.49

70
69
68
66

1.60 - 1.69

INTERVIEWS:
The final reader should also record the personal and overall ratings from the most
credible staff and alumni interview reports in the folder.

INTERVIEW PROFILE (IVP):
BeloW is the language for uniform implementation of the Interview Profile number (IVP)
for use with all Schools and Scholarship Chairs. The IVP will serve as a guide for Chairs
to know when our office needs the reports, and therefore how quickly they need to be
assigned. All interviewers will be told that they should submit their interview report no
later than two weeks after receiving the interview assignment.
1.
2.
3.
4.

Please have interview report in as soon as possible.
Please have interview report in by the sub-committee deadline.
Please have interview report in by December 1 (EA) or March 1 (RD).
No additional information needed at this time.

This language has been distributed to the S&S chairs via email and can also be found in
the updated handbook and website instructions. (Please ask Liz Adams if you need help
accessing the site). Please have a conversation with your chairs to determine if
11

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL

i

ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018552

DX025.0101

you wish to use the IVP, and please make clear that this information should
not be shared with other interviewers or applicants. If your chairs have
additional clerical or operational questions about the IVP, please direct them to email Liz
at SSinfo@fas.harvard.edu.
When reading, please input your IVP code in the relevant spot on the purple code-out
sheet. If you are passing the folder to your chair and you decide that you need the
interview ASAP in the meantime, please input your ~[VP on the orange sheet and hand
that in separately, In this instance, still record the IVP on the purple sheet so
that your chair knows what you have ceded. This will help the data entry
team by minimizing the possibility of conflicting numbers.

PROSE COMMENTS:
If the folder will most likely be discussed in Committee, first readers should note on the
Summary Sheet important academic and extracurricular accomplishments that are
particularly pertinent to the case. it is also helpful to reference teacher reports or other
items that may be crucial to our evaluation of the Case. in addition to numerical
ratings, readers should try to summarize the strengths and weaknesses of the folder in
brief paragraphs or comments. Avoid slang and jargon and try to identify the special
strength of the candidate, if any. REMENBEE - your comments may be open to public
view at a later time.

III.

FOLDER ROUTING

INADVERTENTLY CLEARED FOLDERS: Occasionally, folders will be mistakenly
"cleared" (considered complete) and placed in your basket. (The cause is usually an
inappropriately pulled inventory card.) The applicant will not know that the folder is still
incomplete, because when he or she checks the applicationas status on-line, the
database will indicate that the folder is complete. Return the file to the Records Room
and give it to fan/Jenn with a note indicating what is missing. Do not place wrongly
cleared folders into the misfile box. Any matedal that is misfiled in a folder should be
put in the misfile box as soon as possible. The misfile will often be critical to clearing
another folder.
FOLDERS SHOULD BE READ AND PASSED IN A TIMELY FASHION: Readers
should take care to not allow folders to pile up. First readers need to read folders from
all assigned dockets as they clear, not just those whose subcommittee meets first. This
is important, and we will monitor readinc; progress centrally, ff you need help keeping
up for whatever reason, let us know immediately. Readers should place their

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL

i

ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018553

DX025.0102

completed folders immediately in the basket of the next reader or in the code-out box
in the Fileroom Annex. First-time readers will have a separate code-out box.
SEC:OND READERS: Except by new readers (for whom special routing instructions are
provided below), second readings should be used only in the rarest of instances:
A) Tf three readings are needed for a complex case.
B) If the case raises issues of policy.
C) ]:f the case would be greatly helped by a second reading from the former area
person or someone with special knowledge of an area or type of case.
No second reader will ordinarily be assigned. If you want/need a second reading,
consult the enclosed docket assignment sheet to identify other readers on your docket,
Try not to burden one person inordinately.
F:I:RST-TII~IE READi=I~: New readers should have their first fifty Early Action folders
read by the docket chair as well as any other subsequent folders that might help
instruct the new reader in future evaluations.
GENERAL ROUTING RULES:
1) A folder should be passed directly to the third reader:
A-

If the first reader rates a folder a "2-" or better (ie. a case the first reader thinks
should be admitted)

A-

If the folder will definitely (or almost definitely) be discussed in Committee.

A-

If you want the third readeras opinion or want simply to have the third reader
informed about the case. (Such cases probably should be coded out first.)

If the first reader has a significant degree of uncertainty about how to
proceed with the case, he or she should consult the docket chair.
2) A case rated a 3+ may be coded out or passed to the chair. The first reader should
consider carefully the likelihood that additional anticipated information (e.g., a
superior music rating) will make the case more compelling, in which case the folder
should be passed to the chair. If there is no further information anticipated and the
case is qualitatively a 3+ (a strong case but like many others), an experienced first
reader can code out.

13

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL

i

ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018554

DX025.0103

3) Typically a case rated a "3" or less with no particular attribute that would make it
competitive can be coded out. Obviously !ate information or school context could
change this initial evaluation, The first reader, as an advocate, must be doubly
certain to check all late information that might make a difference to the case prior to
the Committee meetings. This is particularly important for candidates whose
outstanding personal qualities become evident once we have the alumni/ae
interview.
Readers new to a docket should feel free to discuss with the docket chair any special
guidelines about which folders should be passed on and which folders should be coded
out.
All UPDATE/PROFILE sheets should be completed FULLY (WITH INK IN LEGIBLE
FORM), pulled from the folder, and returned to the appropriate boxes in Fileroom
Annex.
Each folder includes an UPDATE/PROFILE sheet with complete names and high school
information so most readers will not have to code these. However, if you need to fill
out a blank sheet, PLEASE WRITE THE COMPLETE NAME OF THE APPLICANT AS
WELL AS THE SCHOOL NAME AND YOUR INITIALS ON A BLANK SHEET
AVAILABLE FROM THE FILEROOM ANNEX.
SPECIAL READINGS
A-

WRF should see cases that could be particularly sensitive or controversial or that
raise issues of fundamental policy.
Folders of competitive candidates who attended secondary school outside the
U.S. and Canada may be passed on to the appropriate U or V docket area person
or RNW if help in assessing foreign credentials is needed. Be selective- donat
pass on a folder unless you are sure the applicant is both competitive and
appealing or has some unusual attributes.

A-

Faculty readings will be done after the folder has been coded out. A
memorandum will be distributed later regarding specific procedures.

A-

Slides/tapes/CDs/DVDs of clearly competitive candidates with an unusually
strong talent may be passed on to appropriate staff/faculty. Handling of this
material will be addressed through memoranda over the course of the fall.

ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED APPLICANTS

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018555

DX025.0104

It has long been a priority for Harvard to seek talented students from all backgrounds,
including those extraordinary individuals who are able to transcend economic
disadvantages and achieve unusual academic distinction. The College Board Descriptor
Plus Data is a new search technique that helps to identify through "geodemographic"
means outstanding students who appear to come from less affluent communities and
socioeconomic backgrounds. A student from the Access Success data search will have a
"Y" printed on the reader sheet next to "HFAI Search?"
DISAD?
After thoroughly reviewing the folder, if you believe the applicant is
from a very modest economic background, please code a "Y" in the
"Disad?" (for staff identified disadvantaged) section on the Reader and
Update Sheets, In the past, admitted students who had been staff identified as
"Disadvantaged=Y" were found to be economically needy 78% of the time.
In addition to the HFA[ Search flag, we have included other parameters to help
with your evaluation of the applicantas economic background. These can be
found in the box located in the upper right of the summary sheet. They are:
A-

FEE PAID:Y or N

A-

FEE WAIVED: Y or N Note: In the past, applying for a fee waiver has been a
reliable indicator of high economic need 89% of the time,
*Please note: ~[n addition to the fee waiver forms we currently accept, we now
include waivers issued by Expanding College Opportunities (ECO). ECO is a
research initiative aimed at increasing the number of high-achieving, low-income
students who apply to selective colleges and universities
HRP_REQUESTED_INFO: Since the summer of 2005, a postcard describing
the Harvard Financial Aid fnitiative has been included within all search letters
mailed to students. Students interested in learning more about financial aid at
Harvard were asked to return the postcard or sign up online in order to be
contacted by HFA]~ student coordinators during the summer and fall. ]~f a student
has returned the postcard from the search, or has otherwise contacted the HFAI
office specifically for information about the program, they will also have a "Y"
next to the "HRP_Requested_Info" designation on the reader sheet.

A-

HRP: This is a rating assigned by the students from HFA] and UMRP based on
the quality of phone conversations they had over the summer. The ratings will
be A, B or C. The student coordinators are supposed to provide a write-up for

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa

HARV00018556

EYES ONLY

DX025.0105

only those student conversations to which they assigned Aas (Tops) and cas (Not
so great). These ratings do not indicate level of need.

OTHER ITEMS

V=

Acknowledgments to guidance counselors, teachers, and others: The area
person may occasionally feel it worthwhile to acknowledge unusually helpful TRs
and SSRs by writing a note to the author. The acknowledgment should bear in
mind that the candidate may or may not be admitted. Supplementa~ letters
of recommendation may have already been acknowledged with a card
or letter, but if not, particularly with recommenders who are alumni or
others about whom Harvard might be concerned, you should call the
letter to the attention of MEH or WRF and an acknowledgment will be
sent.
Support Materials: ALL support material should be dropped into the appropriate
bucket in the mailroom for sorting and scanning.

Misfiled and missincl materials: Please write "misfile" on top of any material that
has been mistakenly filed into the wrong folder and return it to the misfile box in
the Fileroom Annex. If a teacher report, school report or any other material that
would be helpful to a competitive candidate is missing, first readers should
request a copy be re-sent. Folders should be sent on to other readers unless the
missing pieces are crucial. In such cases, first readers should hold onto the file
and check the red folder.
A-

Folder items that require attention: Unanswered letters should be handled by
first readers where appropriate.
Fee Waivers: Any requests for a fee waiver should not be removed from the
folder. However, if a fee waiver request is in the folder and was not recorded,
you should add it to the special notes on the purple Profile sheet.
Twins: Twins may confound our score file. Please be extra careful in checking
and in assigning scores in these cases.

VI.

SCANNING, INDEXING AND THE NOLIJ CONNECT DOCUMENT VIEWER

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018557

DX025.0106

As you know, we have incorporated an image scanning and document viewer system
into the admissions process. The system is intended to ease access to documents that
have been digitally downloaded and printed but not yet filed into the applicant folder. A
second ~process is also in place and designed to capture documents that are mailed,
emailed, faxed or hand delivered. Once these documents are scanned into the system,
the document viewer (nolij connect) delivers an electronic copy of the document to your
desktop. In the event a critical document is not in the physical folder, more than likely
it will be in the image system.
We have added a basket in the mailroom to collect and sort documents received. The
forms collected in these baskets should have content that is *specific* to the admission
decision of the applicant and are marked as such. For example, mailed applications or
supplements, letters of support, teacher reports, Harvard eval, (coach, arts, music,
Harvard faculty), midyear reports, SSRas etc. So you know, we donat scan everything
sent to us: There is a specific bin called "non-scannable materials." Meg Senuta
manages the scanning process and Haley Frampton manages the mailroom/sorting
process. Both are able to answer questions about document types if the need arises.
Documents displayed in the viewer are named by the document type. A list of those
types are displayed below:
A- Application
A- Application Supplement
A- Personal Essay
A- Coach Eval
A- Faculty Eval
A- Arts and Music Eval
A- Fee Waiver
A- Interviews (alum)
A- Staff Interviews
A- Dean/Director Letters
A- Likely Letter
A- Final Report
A- Letters of Support
A- Midyear
A- Reader Sheet
A- SSR
A- SSRPart II
A- Counselor Eval
A- Transcript
A- School Profile
A- Home School Supplement
A- Teacher Report.
17

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018558

DX025.0107

F

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018559

DX025.0108

Class of 2015 - Overall
Apps
Overall

34950i

Admits

Ad Rate

Waitlists

WL Admits** WL Ad Rate

2188

6.3%

3172

31

1.0%

Asian Americans

7310

385

5,3%

784

2

0.3%

- India

1781

60

3.4%

180

1

0.6%

- Pakistan

2601

- Other Indian Subcontinent

177

10

7.1%

91

0.0%

- China

2570

179

7.0%

328

0

0.0%

- Japan

36i

20

5.5%

35

0

0.0%

- Korea

963

60

6.2%

126

0

0.0%

- Other East Asia

315

20

6.3%

40

0

0.0%

- Philippines

412

2.2%

30

0

0.0%

- Vietna m

406

9
25

6.2%

24

0

0.0%

- Other SE Asia

360

17

4.7%

29

0

0.0%

14895

1082

7.3%

1686

22

1.3%

White Americans

** WL Admit numbers included in Admits

Please note that because the total number of applicants in a particular self-designated group is often
small, a minor change in the actual number of students admitted from that group can cause the
percentages to vary noticeably.

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL

i

ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018560

DX025.0109

G

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018561

DX025.0110

Class of 2015 - C Docket
i
C Docket
Asian Americans

Apps

Admits

Ad Rate

Waitlists

WLAdmits~* WL Ad Rate

2071

117

5.6%

183

1

0.5%

664

37

5.6%

75

0

0.0%

- India

59

1

2.7%

8

0

0.0%

- Pakistan

10i

0

0.0%

1

0

O.O%

- Other Indian 5i~bcontinent

11

2

18,2%

O[

0

0.0%

265

18

6,8%

0

0.0%

3

- China
-Japan

701

35

4.3%

7

0

0.0%

~33

6.8%!

16

0

0.0%

- Other East Asia

40

2.5%

10

0

0.0%

- Philippines

68

1

1.5%

3

0

0.0%

- Vietna m

49

3!

0.0%

43

6.1% .......................... _4 ....................
2

0

- Other SE Asia

0

0.0%

5.1%i

1

1.2%

- Korea

White Americans

758

2.3%

39

85

** WLAdmit numbers included in Admits

I
Please note that because the total number of applicants in a particular self-designated group is often
small, a minor change in the actual number of students admitted from that group can cause the
percentages to vary noticeably.

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018562

DX025.0111

H

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018563

DX025.0112

Class of 2015 - NLNA Overall
Apps
] ~dm~-, /~dRat~ " ~aitli;ts

NLNA Overall

34008

WLAdmits** WLAdRate

1846i

5.4%

2894

29

1.0%

353

4.9%

764

2

0.3%

1777

58i

3.3%

179

1

0.6%

- Pakistan

260

10

3.8%

14

1

7.1%

- Other Indian Subcontinent

175

8

4.6%

13

0

0.0%

- China

2526

167

6.6%

316

01

0.0%

- Ja pan

341

11

3.2%

32

0a~

0.0%

- Korea

953

56

5.9%

122

0

0.0%

- Other East Asia

329

17

5.2%

38

ol

o.0~

- Philippines

405

5

1.2%

29i

0

0.0%

5.9%

24

0

0.0%

29

0

0.0%

20

1.4%

Asian Americans
- India

- Vietnam

7225

405

- Other SE Asia

White Americans

24

359

17

4.7%

14193

840

5.9%

1467i

** WL Admit numbers included in Admits

Please note that because the total number of applicants in a particular self-desisnated group is often
small, a minor change in the actual number of students admitted from that group can cause the
percentages to vary noticeably.

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL

i

ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018564

DX025.0113

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018565

DX025.0114

Class of 2015 - NLNA C Docket
Apps
C Docket
Asian Americans

Admits

20311

656

- India

58

- Pakistan

lO

- Other Indian Subcontinent

Ad Rate

" Waitlist~ ~[.Admits~; -Wl.A~ P~te

104

5.1%

168

1

0.6%

35

5.3%

73!

0

0.0%

1.7%

71

0

0.0%

0

0,0%

1

01

0.0%

2

18.2%

0

0

0.0%

- China

261

17

6.5%

35

0

0,0%

-Japan

68

3

4.4% a:

6

0

0.0%

- Korea

132

9

6.8%

16

0

0.0%

11

2.5%1

10

0

0,0%

1.5%

3

0

0.0%

4.2%

4

0

0.0%

2.3%

2

0

0.0%

4.1%

72

1

1.4%

- Other East Asia

4O

- Philippines

68

- Vietnam

48

- Other SE Asia

43

2
1

727

30

White Americans

** Wl_ Admit numbers includedin Admits

Please note that because the total number of applicants in a particular self-designated group is often
small, a minor change in the actual number of students admitted from that group can cause the
percentages to vary noticeably.

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018566

DX025.0115

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018567

DX025.0116

Admissions Committee Members Spring 2011

YEARS ON
HIGHEST
ADMISSIONS ACADEMIC
COMMITTEE IDEGREE

ANDERSON, 1AN

Senior Admissions
Officer & Manager of
Record, Mail and
Transfer Operations

BANKS, ROGER

Senior Admissions
I
Officer & Director of
Recruiting
1

BEILENSON, VALERIE

Admissions Officer

CI.ARK, JESSICA

Admissions &
Financial Aid Officer

DEL TORO-BROWN, MONICA

a:Admissions &
Financial Aid Officer

22

3

ETHNICITY

i Masteras Degree

White

Doctorate

Aftalean American

Bacheloras Degree

White

Bacheloras Degree

White

Masteras Degree

Hispanic

Bacheloras Degree

White

Director of Financial
DONAHUE, SA_RAH

14

DORAN, DEVERY

iAdmissions Officer

Bacheloras Degree

Hispanic

EARLY, DANIELLE

IAdmissions Officer &
Director of lnternet
Communications

Masteras Degree

White

EBOIGBE, PRECIOUS

iAdmissions &
Financial Aid Officer

Bacheloras Degree

African American

EGGART, ELISE

Adnfissions Officer

Masteras Degree

White

Masteras Degree

White

Admissions &
EVANS, BRONWIa;N

Financial Aid Officer

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

t

HARV00018568

DX025.0117

Admissions Committee Members Spring 2011

EVANS, DAVID

Senior Admissions
Officer

41

Masteras Degree

African American

FABER, CHAD

iAdmlsslons &
iFinancial Aid Officer

4

Masteras Degree

White

FITZSIMMONS, WILLIAM

Dean of Admissions &
Financial Aid

37

Doctorate

White

GALINDO, NATHALIE

Admissions Officer

4

Masteras Degree

iHispanic

GANDY, JENNIFER

Senior Admissions
Officer

3

Bacheloras Degree

White

GREEN, ROSEMARY

Special Senior
Adlnissions Officer

33

Doctorate

White

HARTY, SALLY

Admissions Otticer &
Database Manager

33

Bacheloras Degree

White

HOMER, MARCY

Special Senior
Admissions Officer

30

Bacheloras Degree

White

HOWRIGAN, KAITL1N

Senior Admissions
Officer & Database
Administrator

4

Bacheloras Degree

White

28

Masteras Degree

~rhite

9

Ma~t_eras Degr

White

3

I Masteras Degree

Asian American

IRONS, JANET

Senior Admissions
Officer & Senior
Associate Director of
Financial Aid
Senior Admissions
Officer & Associate
Director of Financial

~UFMA_~ JONATHAN

~ Aid ........

KIM, CHARLENE

Admissions &
Financial Aid Officer

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018569

DX025.0118

Admissions Committee Members Spring 2011

KIRKCALDY, AMY

Admissions &
Financial Aid Officer

. Masteras Degree

White

LOGAN, SEAN

Admissions Officer

Masteras Degree

White

LOOBY, CHRISaIaOPHER

aAdmissions &
Financial Aid Officer

Mastcras Degree

White

i Masteras Degree

White

2

Senior Admissions
Officer & Assistant
Director of Financial
iAid for Officer
MAGNUSON, MARY

Oversight and Human
iResources

MASCOLO, CHRISTINE

Senior Admissions
Officer

10

Masteras~_D2gr~

White

MC GILa.TH, MARLYN

Director of
Admissions

24

Doctorate

White

MEAS, SOPHIA

Admissions &
Financial Aid Officer

a,Masteras Degree

Asim~ American

MILLER, DWIGttT

Senior Admissions
:iOfficer

Masteras Degree

White

ORTIZ, LUCERITO

Admissions Officer

Bacheloras Degree

Hispanic

PABST, ELIZABETH

!Admissions Officer

Masteras Degree

White

PAUTZ, JAMES

!Admissions Officer

Masteras Degree

White

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

44

5

HARV00018570

DX025.0119

Admissions Committee Members Spring 2011

RICE, RICK

Admissions Officer &
Director of
Information Systems
in Financial Aid

Masteras Degree

i African American

SWIFT, MARGARET

Senior Admissions
Officer & Director of
Student Employment

Two Masteras
Degrees

White

JD

i White

Masteras Degree

African American

Doctorate

White

Scnior Admissions
Officer & Associate
Director of Financial
VIDRA, KATHRYN

WOODS, PARIS

WORTH, ROBIN

27

Aid

A&nissions &
Financial Aid Officer
Senior Admissions
Officer & Dircctor of
International
Admissions

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

16

HARV00018571

DX025.0120

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018572

DX025.0121

Class of 2015 - Admits
Median Ratinss
Academic

2

Extracurricular

2

Athletic

3

Personal

2

Teacher Report 1

2

Teacher Report 2

2

SSR - Guidance Counselor

2

Reader 1 Overall

2

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018573

DX025.0122

HARVO0018574

DX025.0123

HARV00018575

DX025.0124

For Entrance in Fall 2011 . Application Materials

Thank you for your interest in Harvard College. We know there are many fine colleges and universities from
which to choose, and we are happy that you are looking closely at the exciting opportunities available here in
Cambridge.
Our admissions procedures are designed to give you maximum freedom and flexibility to present yourself in your own words. We
bope you will respond in whatever ways you feel will best demonstrate your interests and accomplishments. Here are some recommendations we hope you will consider as you complete your application.

A- Candidates may complete testing (SAT orACT with writing and two SAT Subject Tests) by using the January SAT or the February
ACT dates, but we urge you to have your testing completed by the December date. Please note that in order for your application to
be considered complete, your official test scores must submitted directly to Harvard by the testing agency on your behalf.
A- We no ionger have an early admission program. Please refer to the next page for more information.
A- Keep copies of all materials submitted and ask your teachers to do the same. Materials can be lost in the mail.
A- Supplementary materials or portfolios may be submitted but yon should do so only if you have an unusual talent. St~ch materials are
neither required nor expected as the required components of the application provide ample basis on which to make our decisions.
Because we cannot retttm materials, applicants should send only duplicates.
A- Write about what matters to you. There are no "right" essay topics and no "right" answers.

The answers to many questions abot~ admissions requirements and deadlines are included on the following pages. For an expanded list
of frequently asked questions and their answers, please consult the FAQ index on our website: www.admissions.college.harvard.edu.
Each admission decision is made without any regard for a candidateas financial need -- a policy we call "aneed-blind admission."
Indeed the Admissions Committee may respond Favorably to evidence that a candidate has overcome significant obstacles, financial or
otherwise. Once an applicant is admitted, we create an individual financial aid package that will enable that studentas family to meet
the cost of attendance. Providing financial access to Harvard for every admitted student is one of our highest priorities.
We hope you will take every opportunity to explore whether Harvard might be a good match for your academic, extracurricular and
personal interests. Advice from your College counseh~; your Family and the many publications on college admission may help, as
might a visit to Cambridge or a conversation with one of our more than 10,000 alumni!ae who help us recruit students in all 50 states
and around the world.
Please let us know if we can be of assistance to you during the admissions process. Best wishes for a happy and productive year.

William R. Firzsimmons
Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid

Marlyn MeGrath
Director of Admissions

Sarah C. Donahue
Director of Financial Aid

HARV00018576

DX025.0125

For Entrance in Fall 2011 . Application Materials
A S[aternent on Early Admission
Harvard College/~as eliminated its early admission program and
has moved to a single application deadline of January 1. The
change in policy, whictt builds on Harvardas efforts over the past
several years to expand financial aid acid increase opermess in admissior~s, took effect for students who applied in the fall of 2007

fi,r the freshman class entering in September 2008. To read more
about the elimination of Early Action at Harvard College, please
visit ~*wu:admissions.college.harvard.edu!announcemenls!
earlyadmission.htmL

For Entrance in Fall 2011 . Application Instructions
Application Timetable

Applying to Harvard

IMMEDIATELY

Application Fee

Please send:
A-

A-

The Common Application or the Universal College
Application.

Please attach the check or money order to the first page of the application
mad ensure that ~e applicantas name appears on the payment. You may
also pay your application fee online with a credit card via the Common
Application or the Universal College Application wehsites.

The $75 application fe~ or a fee waiver request.

Without your Common ApplicationiUaiversal Application, we cannot
open your admission file, trackasupporting documents lbr your application, or send your name to our alumniiae for a possible interview in
your area.
The Short Answer about one of your activities, the Personal Essay and
the Harvard Application SuppleJnent may be sent at a later da~e.

DECEMBER 1

If paying the application fee would cause a hardship for your family,
please request a fee waiver. You or your gnidznce counselor may use
one of the official forms or may simply write a short letter, asking us to
waive your fee.
Common Application and Universal Application
Harvard accepts the Common Application and the Universal College
Application. Both will be treated equally by the Admissions Committee.
Please choose one.

We will begin our careful evaluation process on this date,

Y~u may choose to send your personal Statement and Short Answer

reading applicstions in the order in which they are completed.

on a separate piece of paper. If you do so, please write your full name,
address, birthdate and high school on each page. Please avoid submitting
materials in binders or folders.

Our alumni/ae interviewers would appreciate yo~tr sending the Corn- a
men Application/Universal .Application by this date to allow them to

If you do not receive acknowledgement of ~our application within two

begin the interviewing process where possible.
We recognize that you and your secondary school teachers and counselors have many commitmeals that may preclude submission of your
application materials by December 1. If so, please be assured that you
will not be penalized in any way.

weeks of submitting your application, please write to college@los.
harvard.edu or call (617) 495-1551. This is very important, because applications tun get lost in the mail.
Please note, we will not begin processing applications until October so
the earliest you would receive an acknowledgement is mid-October.

JANUARY 1
Final deadline for all application materials.

Additional Dates to Consider
January22,2011
Last SAT Reasoning and Su~e~ t~sfing d~e.

School Report and Mid-Year School Report
Please.give these forms to your school counselor or other school advisor
and ask that the School Report form be completed and returned to our
off]co as soon as possible. The Mid-Year Report should be returned in
February 2011 with your latest grades.
If you have attended more than one high school in the past tw6 years,
give a second copy of the School Report to your former counsdor(s) or
school offici!l to complete.

February 12, 2011
Last ACT testing date.

Teacher Evaluations

Note: This test date is not available in New York.

Give the two Evaluation forms to teachers in different academic subjects
who know you well.

Early April 2011
Decision letters mailed.

Standardized Testing
SVe require the SAT Reasoning Test or ACT Test with Writing, as well as

May 1, 2011
Reply date for admitted students. No deposit required.

two SATSubject Tests. Students should not submit two Subject Tests in
mathematics to meet this requirement. Candidates whose first language
is not English should ordinarily not use a Subject Test in their first
language to meet the two Subject Tests requirement.

HARV00018577

DX025.0126

For Entrance in Fall 2011 . Application Materials
Please see our website for further information. Students are free to use
the College Board Score Choice option or the similar option offer by the
ACT. Our official codes are 3434 for the College Board SAT Reasoning
and Subject Tests and 1840 for the ACT.

your full name and the information you would like to include in your
file. We do not open e-mail attachments.

When registering for tests, please use your name as it will appear on your
Harvard application. Using a nickname may preveut your scores from
matching up with the rest of your application in our database.

If you have a concern regarding your standardized test scores as
they appear on your status page, please send a brief message
describing the issue to us at seores@fas.harvard.edu. Please be
sure to include your full name, date of birth and name of high school
in your message.

In order for your application to be considered complete, we must have
your official test scores submitted directly to Harvard by the testing
agency on your behalf. If we do not receive your official scores from the

Test Score Reporting Issues

testing agency, we will be unable to make a decision on )Adegour file. Please
plan accordingly.

%aithdraw Your Application

Directions for sending your offcial scores to the admlssiens office can

tofileroom@fas.harvard.edu ~dth the word ~Withdraw" in the subject
line. In the message body, please type your full name, daie of birth and

be found at w~w.co!legeboardcem/student/testing/satiscores/sending.
htmI for the SAT and SAT Subject Tests and www.actstudent.org!scores/
send/for the ACT. Harvard College official Codes are 3434 for the SAT
and 1840 for the ACT.

. .~

To withdraw ~our application, please write to us or send an e-mail

name of high school You will receive a confirmation via reguIar mail.
E-Mail Decisions

After You Have Applied
Personal Interview
When and where possible, applicants may be invited to meet with
alulrmi/aAC/ in or near their school communities. No candidate is at a
disadvantage if an interview cannot be arranged.

You may indicate whether you would like to have your decision sent
to you via e-maiL If you choose this option, pleas~ alter your e-marl
filters to allow messages fiaom colIege@fas.harvard.edu and
fileroorn@fas.harvard.edu to reach your inbox. An official decision
letter wilt be sent via regular mail to all applicants who have received an
e-mail notification.

Applicants Outside the United States
Contact Information Update
If you change your mailing address, phone number or e-mail address
after submitting your application, please use the applieam status page
to correct this information. If you do not have Interact access, please
contact the Admissions Office by writing tofileroom@fas, harvcoad, adu
and include the phrase "Contact Info Update" in the subject line.

If you are applying from a school outside the United States, you should
follow the same procedures and timetables as candidates applying from

Please be sure to include your full name, date of bixth and name of high
school when contacting the Admissions Office.

Even if you are submitting the results of your school leaving exams
(e.g., GCE A-levels, International Baccalaureate,Abitur, etc.) you must
submit the results of the SAT Reasoning Test or the ACT (with Writing,
if available), as well as the results of two SAT Subject Tests by the appropriate deadlines.

Application Status Cheek
All applicants will receive an Application Access Code by e-mail. This
code will allow you to check the status ef your application materials
online. We track applications, supplements, school reports, test scores
and teacher evaluations. We do not track interviews, essays or supplemental letters ofrecommendatiou.

schools within the U.S. Below we list a few special notes.

Testing Requirements

,A candidate wliose first language is not English should ordinarily not
take the SAT Subject test in his or her native language as one of the
two required SAT Subject Tests. Al! students are encouraged to submit
addittonal Subject Tests (which may include one in a studentas first
language).

If you do not receive an Application Access Code message within two
weeks of submittlng your application, you may request your access code
electronically by sending an e-mail to admpAC/n@fas.harvard.edu. Please
write "Access Code" in the subject line and y~ur full name, date of birth

Students are not required to take the TOEFL unless they do eel have
access to other standardized tests.

and name of high school in the message body. We will send your Access
Cede to the e-mail address you included ou your application.

Interviews

Please note that we do not begin processing applications until October
so the earliest you would receive your access code is mid-October.
To facilitate delivery, please alter your e-mail filters to allow messages
fiaom college@fas.harvard.edu andfileroom@fas.harvardedu to reach
your inbox.

While we try to make interviews widely available, it will not always
be possible to arrange one abroad. In some countries, there are simply
too many applicants for our alumni interviewers to see everyone. No
candidate is at a disadvantage if an interview cannot be arranged. Please
see our website to determine whether an interview is possible in your
hmne country.

Application Updates

Translations

To send information updates to your application, please write te us or
send an -mall tof!leroom@fm.harvard.edu with the phrase "Application Update" in the subject line. In the body of the message, please type

We appreciate the effort that many applicants make in providing the
Admissions Committee with a translation of the recommendatious
submitted on their behalf. We ask, however, that any translations

HARVO0018578

DX025.0127

For Entrance in Fall 2011 . Application Materials
include the name of&e trat~slator and that the original tultrmMatad
reports be submitted as ~veiL

Financial Aid Timetable
Immediately

Application Fee
You may pay online by credit card via the Common AFplication or the
Universal Application w,e,bsites. Please be sure that your credit card has
bee~ activated for Interact transactions.

Please review the financial aid application instructions found o~ the
Prospective Students section of our website.

February 1

If paying by check, we ask that international applicants send us the
application fee ia the form era foreign draft that is, a check in U.S.
dollars that is drawn through a U.S. bank, but is ganeralIy available at

Submit the initial components of your fmanaial aid application, following the instructions found on the Prospective Students section of our

most foreign banks.

website. We realize that you may not have access to your final 2010
tax information by this deadline and ask that you use the best available

If you needto send the fee to us via wire transfer, please send an e-mail

estimated figures.

to college@[as.harvardedu and we will send instructions on how to do
so. Please be sure to include your full name, date of birth and name of
high school in your mcssage.

March I
Final deadline for all application materials, including tax and income
documentation.

For More Information
To request missing forms or other information, you may contact us
through our website www.admisslons.college.harvard.edwaapply/

Helpful Application Checklist

internationa!/ or via e-mail: intladm@fas.ham~ard.edu.

Requirements for All Applicants:

All Applicants

[] Official score report from the SAT Reasoning test orACT with
Writing component

Harvard~Admissio~ Policy
Harvard University makes all decisions concerning applicants, students,
facalty and staffcn the basis of the individualas qualifications to
contribute to Harvardas educational objectives and insfitutiona~ need.
Discriminating against individuals on the basis of race, color, gender,
sexual orientation, religion, age, national or ethnic origin, political
beliefs, veteran status or disability unrelated to course requirements
is inconsistent with the purposes of a university and with the law.

Vl[[l Official score reports Prom two SAT Subject Tests
[] CommonApplieation or Universal College Application
[] HarvardApplieation Supplement
[] Application fee of $75 or a request for a fee waiver
[] Secondary School Report

Misrepresentation of Credentials
Occasionally, a candidate for admission wilt make inaccurate statements or submit false material in connection with his or her application_ In most eases, these misrepresentations are discovered during the
admission process and the application is rejected. If a misrepresentation
is discovered after a candidate has been admitted, the offer of admiszion
normally will be withdrawn.
Ifa misrepresentation is discovered after a student has registered, the
offer of admission normally will be revoked and the student will be
required to leave the ColIege. If the discovery occurs after a degree has

and
[] Mid-Year Report
V1EI TwoTeaeher Evain ations
[] Financial Aid Application (by February 1, if you plan to apply)
[] Update address, phone and e-mail if recently changed

been awarded, the degree normally will be rescinded.
The determina~on that an application is inaccurate or contains
misrepresentations rests solely with the Admissions Office and will
be resolved outside the student disciplinary process.

HARV00018579

DX025.0128

2010-11 FIRST-YEAR AP P LICATION
For Spring 2011 or Fall 2011 Enrollment

APPLICANT
Legal Name
Lest/EamityiSur (E~.ter neme ex~AC/tI.F ae it appeers en officiel decum~nte.)

0 Female 0 Male

Preferred Pl~one O Home O Cell

US Soci~ 8ecud~ Number, if ~
Cell (

Home (
)
Area Code

}
ArAC/~ Cod~

IM Address

E-mail Address
Permanent home address

Jr.. etc.

Middle (camplet~)

~rmer last name(s), if any

Preferred name, if not first name (choose only one)
Birth Date

Fire~"Givert

fi~mber & sffeet

Apartment #
za,P/Po~te! Cede

County
(from

If different from abave, please give your current mailing addre~ for all admission correspondence.

to
(mmtddiYyyy)

(mmldd/yyy}a)

Current maiIing address

County/Parish

State/Pro~a]nce

Country

ZIP/Pastel C~de

If your current mailing address is a boarding school, include name of school here:

FUTURE PLANS.
Your answers to these questions will vary for different colleges. If the online system did not ask you to answer some of th~ questions you see in this section, this college
chose not to ask that question of its applicants.

Deadline

College

mre/dd/yyyy

Do you intend to apply for need-based financial aid?

OYes ONo

Decision Plan

Do you intend to apply for merit-based scholarships?

OYes ONo

Academic Interests

Do you intend to be a full-time student?,

OYes ONo

Do you intend to enroll In a degree program your first year?

OY~s ONo

EntryTerm: 0 Fall (JuI-Dec)

0 Spring {Jan-Jun)

Do you intend to live in colIege housing?
Career Interest.

What is the highest degree you intend tq earn?

DEMOGRAPI~{ICS
Ci~zenship Status

1, Are you Hiepanic!Latino?

Non-US Citizenship

A(c) Yes, Hispanic or Latlno (including Spain) 0 No

,

.
"

Z Regardlessofyouran~erto~ep~ior~uestion please indicate howy6uidPn~
yourself. (Ch~k all that apply,)
0 Amedca~ Indian ~ ~ Nata.~ Oncluding a~ Original Peop~ ~ ~e Americas)"

Years lived in the US?

N~ you ~rotled? 0 Yes 0 No If yes, ~ease ~nter~ribal Enrollment Num~r

Birthplace
State/Pro#nee

C~antr~"

First Language
0 Asian (including }ndian subcontinent ~nd ~ilippices)

Primary language spoken ~t home

Plea.~ d~flb~ your back~ound ...................... ~ ......

Are you proficient in any other languages?
0 Black orNrlcan American (including Ndca and ~ibb~an)

Optional The items with a gray background are optional, No Information you
provide will be used in a discriminatory manner.

0 Native Hawaila~ or O~r Pacific islander (Original Peoples)

Marital StatL~
Religious Preference

0 White (including Middle Eastern)

USArrned Services veteran? OYes 0 No
AP-~/201O-ll

Common Application, Inc.

HARV00018580

DX025.0129

FAM 1 LY
Please list both parents below, even if one or more is deceased or no longer has legal responsibilities toward you. Many colleges collect this information for
demographic purposes even if you are an adult or an emancipated minor. If you are a minor with a bgai guardian (an individual or govemmant entit3,), then please
list that informal~on below as well. If you wish, you may list step-p~rento and/or other adults with whom yo~ reside, or who otherwise care for you, in the Additional
Information section.
Household
Parentsa marital status (relative to each other):

0 Never M~rried

0 Married

0 Widowed

0 Separated

0 Divorced (date
m,~/yyyy

With when] do you make your permanent homo?
Parent 1:

A(c) Mother

A(c) Father

lsParentlliving? OYea

ONe

0 Parent 1

0 B~

0 P~ront 2

0 Legal 6uardian

Parent ;2:0 Mother

0 Unknown
(Date Deceased __

)

0 Ward of the Court/State
0 Father

IsParent21iving? OYes

ONe

0 Unknown
(Date Deceased
m~n/yyyy

mm/yyyy
Last/F~rnily!Sur

M~.ddle

First/rivet1

Title (MfJMs.i~r., AC/tc.j

Firs!/tFven

Leet/Family/$ur

Count~ of birth

Country of birth.

Home address if different from yours

Home address if ~ifferont from yours

PCeferred Phone:

0 Home

0 (;ell

OWork

0 Other

Preferred Phane:

E-rna[I

E-mall

Occupation

Occupation

Employer.

Emp oyeL

OHome

OCell

etc.}

OWork

College (if any)

CEEB__

ColIege (if any)

CEEB__

Degree

Year__

Degree

Year __

Graduate School (if any)

CEEB__

6raduate School (if any)

CEEB__

Degree

Year__

Degree

Year __

Legal Gaardia~ (if ot~er than a parent)

Siblings
Please give names and ages or your brothers or sisters. If they have attended or
are currently attending college, give the names of the undergraduate institution,
grade level, degree earned, and approximate dates of attendance. If more than
three siblings, please list them In the Addifionat Information section.

Rel~ionship to you

r.a~f/FamilyYSur

First/Given

Middle

Title

Home address if different from yours
Age & tirade

CEEB __

Oollege Attended

Preferred Phone:

(3 Homo

0 Cell

Degree earned.
or expected

A(c) Work

Area Cede

Name

E-mail

College Attended

Occupation

Degree earned
or expected

Employer

Dates

Age & ~ra~e

mm/y~,y- mm/.vyyy
Reletidnship
CEEB __

Dates

,
mm/y/yy- ma~/yyyy

College (Jr any)
Degree

Year.__

Coltege Attended

6radeate School (if any)

CEEB

L~egrea earned
or expeated

Degree
e 2010 The Common AppIicaLion, Inc,

Year

CEEB __
Dates
mm/yyyy - mm/yyy~
A ?-).12nle-11

HARV00018581

DX025.0130

EDUCATION
S~AC/mndary School~
Current or most ~aecent secondary school attended
SchooIType:

Gradua~on Date

Entry Date
mrn/yyyy

0 Public A(c) Cha~ter 0 Independent 0 Religious 0 Home School

mm/d#/yy!y

OEEB!ACT Cede

Address

State/Province
Ci~yHolvn

ZIP/Poeta!

~9tlnhay

C~unseloras ~tle

Counseloras ~a~e (MrdMs./~r., etc.) "

F~

aPhone ~

E-m~il

Are~ Code

i~umbo~

Area Cede

~aL

Ust ~1 ~ar s~nd~ schools you ~ve a~ended since nin~ grade, including summer schools ar enrichment programs ho~ed on a seconda~ ~hool campus:

please list any community program/organ~a~on ~t has provlded free assistance wilh your application process:
If your secondary school educalJon was or will be interrupted, please indicat~ here and provide details in the Additional Information sest~on:
Colleges&Universities Ust all colleges you have attended since ninth grade, including summer schools or enrichment programs hosted on a college cam2usYes

ACADEMICS
The self-reported information in this section is not intended to take the place of your official resords. Please note the requirements of each institution to which you are
applylng and arrange for official transcripts and score reports to be sent from your secondary school and ~e appropdat~ testing agencies. Where"Best Scores" are
requested, please report the highest individual scores you have earned so far, even if ~ose scores are from different test dates.
Class Rank.__ (;lass Size__ Weighted? O Yes O No
6PA ~ Scale
6fades
ACT

Exam Dates:

Best Scores:

SAT

Exam Dates:

Best Scores: __

TOEFU

Exam Dates:

Best Score: __

~II~S~T Best Scor~ ~

Current Courts Please i~icate tiOe, lewl (AP, ~B, adw~sed ho~o~, etc.) ~d credit ~alue of all ~urses you ~ro takinO this y~ar. 1~ qua~er c]~s~ t~n in
A- e s~me semester o~ ~e app~pri~te esm~ter Lin&

2010 ~e

AP-3/201e-11

~rnmon ~plicalion, Inc.

HARV00018582

DX025.0131

[alOl]OrS Briefly list any academic distinctions or honors you have received since the 9= grade or international equivalent (e.g. National Merit, Curn Laude Society),

EXTRACURR1CULARACTIVITIES & WORK EXPERIENCE
Extracurricular

Please list your principal extracurricular, volunteer, and work activities in their order of impedance to you. Feel free to group your activities and
paid work experience separately if you prefer. Use the space available to provide details of your activities and accomplishments (specific events, varsity letter, musical
instrument, employer, etc.). To allow us to focus on the highlights of your activities, please complete this section even if you plan to affach a r4sum&

~ y~n pJan

O00OO

00000

0

0

0000,0

0

0

00000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

O-

Q

ooo. oo
ActMty

ooooo
00000
-Activity

ooo0o
Activity

o o o.
Activity:

OOQO0

0
O000O

0

0

A(c) 2010 The Commor, Application, Inc.

HARV00018583

DX025.0132

WRITING
short Arlswer Please briefly elaborate on one of your extracurricular activities or work experiences in the space below or on an attached sheet (150 words er fewer}.

Personal Essay Please write an essay (250 words minimum) on a topic of your choice or on one of the options listed below, and attach it to your application
before submission. Please indicate your topic by checking the appropriate box. This personal essay helps us become acquainted with you as a persan and
student, apart from courses, grades, test scores, and other objective ~late. It will also demonstrate your ability to organize your thoughts and express yourself.
NOTE: Your Common Apphacation essay should be the same f~r all colleges. 0o not customize it in any way for individual colleges. Colleges that want austhmized
essay responses wilt ask for them on a supplement form.
O Evaluate a significant experience, achievement, risk you have taken, or ethical dilemma you I~ave faced and its impact on you.
~) Discuss some issue of personal, local, national, ur interoational concern and its importance to you.
~) Indicate a person who has had a significant influence on you, and describe that influence.
~) Dsscribeacharacterin~ctian~ahist~dca~gure~racreatlv~w~rk(asinartamusic~science~et~)thathashadanin~ue~ceeay~u,andexp~ainthatinf~uencea
0 A range of academic interests, personal perspectives, and life experiences adds much to the e~lasational mix. Given your personal background, describe an
experience that illustrates what you would bring to the diversity in a college community, or an encounter that demonstrated the importance of diversity to you.
0

0 Topic of your choice.

Additional lnfermatiG!] if there is any additional information youad like to provide regarding special circumstances, additional qualifications, et~., please do so in the
space below or on an attached sheet.

Disciplinary History

,

0 Have you ever besn found responsible for a disciplinary violation at any educationat instifotion you have attended from 9= grade (or the international equivalent)
forward, wtiether rel~ted to academic misconduct or behavioral misconduct, that resulted in your probation, suepen.ston, removal, dismissal, or expulsion from
the institution? 0 Yes 0 No
~) Have you aver been adjudicetad guilty cr eanvicted of a mistiemeanor, telony, or other cdme? A(c)Yes A(c)No
Note that you are not required to answer "yes" to this question, or provide an exptanation, if the criminal adjudication or conviction has been expunged, sealed,
~nulled, pardA(c)nell, destroyed, erased, impounded, or otherwise ordered by a court to be kept confidential.
If you answered yes to either or both (luealJens, please attach a separate sheet of paper that gives the approximate date of each incident, explains the circumstances, and
reflects on what you learned trom the experience.

S I G NATU RE
Application Fee Payr~ent ti this coll~ge r~quires an application fee, how will you be paying it?
0 Online Payment 0 Will Mail Payment

0 Online Fee Waiver Request 0 Will Mail Fee Waiver ttequest

Required Signature
[] I certify that all i~thrmatiea submitted in the admission process--indudthg the application, the personal essay, any supplements, and any other supposing
materials--is my own work, factually true, end honestly presented, and that these documents will become the properly of the i~stitutfons to which I am a~ptying
and will not be returned to me. I understand that I may be subject to a range of possible disciplinary actions, including admission revocation or expulsion, should
the thfermation I have certified be false.
[] I acknowledge that I have reviewed the application instructions for each college receiving this application. I understand that al! offers of admission are conditional,
pending receipt of final transcripts showing work comparable in quality to that upon which the offer was based, as well es honorable dismissal from the school.
[] I affirm that I will send an enrollment deposff (or equivalent) to only one institution; sending mu#iple deposits (or equivalent) may result in the withdmmat of my
admission offers from aft institutions. [Note: students may send an enrollment deposit (or equivalent) to a second institution where they have been admitted from
the waitlist, provided that they inform the fLast institution that they will no longer be enrolling.]

Date

Signature -~

age, martial status, parental status physical disabili~ leamthg diaabifi~ political affiliation veteran status, or sexual orienrazmn.
o 2010 "APSn~ Common Application, Inc.

1
AP-S/201~-11

HARVO0018584

DX025.0133

For Entrance in Fall 2011 a Application Supplement

Valid for entrance in September 2011 on]); Please submit
this form as well as the Common Application or the
Universal College Application as soon as possible.

Office of Admissions and Financial Aid
86 ]3rattle Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Pleasg return lhis form to us by December 1. The final deadline for all application materials is January 1.
A completed application includes all potions of the Common Application or the Universe1 College Application, as well as
the I~rv~d Application Supplement. required official testing results, a Secondary Schoo!Report, two Teacher Evaluations
and a $75 application fee or fee waiver request.

Full legal name

Dote of Birth

Prefer to be calfed

Address
No, and Street

Apt.lUnit

Zip/Posta! Code

Country

StatetProvince

City

TAPS1ephone Number

CEEB/ACT code

Secondary School

If you can be reached
by fax or e-mail, please
provide a fax number
or e-mall address and
name of the contact
person.

Would you like your
admieslon decision
e-mailed to you? A
decision letter will be
sent via regular mail to
all applicants.

ff you have previously
applied for admission
to Harvard, please
indicate when and for
which program you
applied.

0

Yes

O

Ccilege(fffstyear)
Year(s) .__

0

No

0

O Summer School

Extension School
Year(s)__

Year(s) __

Please forward the transcripts rot any p[ogram in v~,hich you enrolled.

For the follawing question, please place the latter or number indicating your choice in the space provided.

Of the following fields
of study, which are you
currently most likely to
pursuea/

A Social Sciences
B Humanities
C Biological Sciences
D Physica[ Sciences

E ~.ngineefing
F Mathematics
G Computer Science

First Choice__

HARV00018585

DX025.0134

At this time, which
t~o college actia,4ties
or sports interest you
moat?

Ou[

of~,cAC/ may sAC/~d you c-

Icero. Tbe~ e-m~ls will be
deffvered to ~ur e-m~l
addre~ as provid~ on
page one of~e Common
or Unlve~al A~plicadon.

01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14

15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28

Arts, Visual Arts
Dramatics
Voca~ Music
Band
Orchestra
Writing / Literary Magazine
Journalism
Student Government
Debate
Social Service
Ethnic Groups
Religious Groups
Political Groups
Dance

First Choice__

ira sport, indicate

29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41

OutdoorP,ctivities
Baseball
Basketball
Crew-Heavyweight
Crew-Light,eight
Fencing
Field Hockey
Football
Golf
Hockey
Lacrosse
Sailing
Ski-Alpine
Ski-Nordic Racing

Soccer
Softball
Squash
Swimming, Diving
Tennis
Track, Cress-Country
Volleyball
Water Polo
Wrestling
Cheerleading
Marl[atAds
MUN
Gender and Sexuality

42 Other

Second Chaice

Intercollegiate

Intercollegial.e

Club / Intramural / Recreational

Club / Intramura! / Recreational

intended level of
participatfon.

"~AC/hile we recognize that many studentsa plans change during their collage yamas, we ask you to respond to the following questions
(please choose

How definite do you

one rating per question):

ebs61utety hertain

I

absolutely cer[ain

1

absolutely ce~ain

1

2

3

4

5

very likeIy te change

oonsider your
academic plane to be?

How definite do you

very likely to change

consider your
vocational plans lo be?

How definite are your
extracurricular andlor
athletic Interests?

2

3

4

5

very likely to change

Please list the cities
end countries where
you have lived, with
years of residence in
each,

Which languages other
then English can you
speak, read or wdta?
(Please indicate with S,
R or W.)

Teacher Evaluations

This application includes two Teacher Evaluation forms. Aider completing your portion of the forms, you should give them retouchers in
different academic subjeet~ who know you well and preferably have taught you during your final two.years of seho0I. As a courtesy to
your teacher% you migl~t provide them with stamped envelopes addressed to Harvard Admissioss.
To help us check for completeness of your application, please list your teachersa names.

Teacher Evaluation 1

OPTIONAL

Teacher Evaluation 2

We do not expect or require applicants to submit supplementary materials or additional essays. We simply want to be certain
that you have even! opportunity to tell us about yourself.
Harvard Supplement: Side 2 of 3

HARV00018586

DX025.0135

Supplementary

The required components of the application to Harvard provide a~ ai~ple bas~s to make our admission decisions. However, students

Materials

with exceptional talents or ackievements may send music recordings, slides of artwork or selected samples of academic work (e.g.,
creative wfting) for us to consider as part of their application fries. At the discretion of the Achnissions Committee, submissions may be
evaluated by faan]ty. Supplementary materials are not required or expaeted---und should be sent only if the applicantas work is unusually advmmext. Bccanse we cam~ot rctman such materials, applicants should send only duplicates. For more inferma~oa, please visit our
website: w~v.admissions.enllega.harvard.edu/apply/app!ieaffon~roeess/supplements.htmL
Check here if you are pl~mting to send supplementao~ materials to be evalu~tad us part of your application. Please send all silpplementaly material~ to the Admissions Off~ce so that they can be properly labeled and included in your file. DO NOT submit materials
direetly to academic departments. If you are submitting research materials for review, please include a short statement putting the msearch project i~to ~e context of your academic interests and future plans and ciear!y indicate the research advisor (if any) with whom
yen have worked.

A(c) .Academic work
"iltle (if any)

Name of Research Advisor

Phone or E-mail

Name of Institution (if arty)

A(c) Music lape r~r CD*

A(c) Slides of artwork

O Other
(Explain)

Media

Instrument

*Please note that CD format is preferred, but t~pes will still be evaluated, Do not send video recordings of mnsicaI performances or recitals.

Additional Essays

Occasionally, stndents feel that college application forms do not provide a sufficient oppertmaity to convey important information about
tliez ~selves or their accomplistmaenrz. If you vdsh to include an additional assay, you may do so.
PossibleToplcs:
A- An academic experiense (course, project, paper or research topic) that has

A- Unusual circumstances in your life
A- Travel or living experiences in other countries
A- Books that have affented you the most

SIGNATURE

meant the mo~t to you
o Alist ofbooks you have read duringthepasttwelvemonths

Name

H.arvard Supplement: Side 3 of 3

HARV00018587

DX025.0136

COMMON
APPLICATION

2010-11 SECONDARY SCHOOL P PORT 8R
For Spring 201i or Fall 2011 Enrollment

TO THE APPLICANT
After completing all the relevant questions below, give this form to your secondary school counselor or another school official who knows you better. It applying
via mail, please also give ~at school official stamped envelopes addressed to each institution that requires a Secondary School Repert.

O Female

Legal Name
L~sL*F~mfiy/5u~ ~Entar nar~e ez~etly ~s it a~pear.~ on offict~f d~cum~nts.)

Middle(complete)

FfrsU6iveo

J&

O Male

Social Security #

Birth gate
mm/d~/yyyy

Address

fC~m~ar & Street

A.oartmant #

~b.WTeWn

Staff/Province

Boo,try

ZIP/P~al ~ode

CEEBIAUf Bode

School you now attend

Current year courses--please indicate title, level (AP, IS, advanced honors, etc.) and credit value of all courses you are taking this yean Indicate quarter
classes taken in the same semester on the appropriate semester line.
First S~mestedgrime~ter

Seemed S~mester~rim~t~r

T~ad Tfim~1~

IMPOITIaAI~r PRIVACY NOTE: By signing this form, I authorize all schools that I have attended te release all requested records covered under the Federal
Educational Rights and Privacy ~ot (FERPA) so that rny appIication may be reviewed by the Common Application member institution(s) to which I am applying.
I further anti]prize the admission officers reviewing my application, including seasonal staff employed for the sol~ purpose of evaluating applications, to contact
officials at my current and former schools should they have questions about the school forms submitted on my behalf.
! understand that under the terms of tl~e FERPA, after I matriculate I will have access to this form and eli other recommendations and supporting documents
subrntttod by me and on my b~.half after matriculating, untess at least one of the following is true:
1. The institution does not save recommendations pest-matriculation (see list at www.commonapp.org/FEBPA).
2. I waive my right to access below, regardless 0f the institution to which it is sent:
A(c) Yes, I de waive my right to access, and I understand I will never see this form er any Dther recommendations submitted by me o[ on my behalf.
A(c) No, I do not waive my right to access, and I may someday choose to see this form or any other recemmendations or supporting documents submitted by me or
on my behalf to the institution at which I~m enrolling, if that institution saves them after I matriculate.
Date

Required Signature ~

TO THE SECONDARY SCHOOL COUNSELOR
Attach applicantas official transcript, including courses in progress, a school profile, and transcript legend. (Check transcript copies for madabil~.] ~a b6th pages to
complete your evaluation for this student. Be sure to sign below.

Counseloras Name (Mr./Ms,f Dr., etc.)
Please print or

Date,

Slgnature~
School

T~le
School Address
City/Town

Counseloras Phone (__)
4tea Coda
. Secondary school CEEB/ACT code

St~Ze/ProW~ce

Ext.

Country

ZIPlPo~tat ~ode

)
Counselora~ Fax (
Area ~oda

Counseloras E-mail
SR-1tZ010-11

2010 ~a Commo~ Application, Inc,

HARV00018588

DX025.0137

Background Information

Class Size

Class Rank

C~vering a period from

How many courses does your school offer:.
AP
}B
Honors

to __

If school policy limits the number a student may take,
please tist the maximum allowed:
AP
iB
Honors

The rank is 0 weighted A(c) unweighted. How many students share this rank?
A(c) We do not rank. Instead, please indicate quartile

quintile __ docile

Is the applicant an IB Diploma candidate? 0 Yes 0 No

Cumulative GPA: __ on a __ scale, covering a period from

to

Are classes token on a blo~ schedule? (~Yes A(c) No
In comparison w~h other college preparatory students
at your school, the applicantas course selection is:

This GPA is A(c) weighted 0 unweighted. The schoolas passing mark is
Highest GPA in class

Graduation Date
(mm.~add,.yyyy)

Percentage of graduating class immediately attending:

four-year

two-year institutions

A(c)
A(c)
0
0
0

most demanding
very demanding.
demanding
average
below average

How long have you knnwn this student and in what context?.
What are the first words that come to your mind to describe this student?

Ratings Compared to other studepts in his or her class year, how do you rate this student In terms of:

Academic achievement
Extracurricular accomplishments
Personal qualities and character
ovEPALL ......

:

EvaiuaUon Please provide comments that will help us differentiate this student from others. Feet free to attach an additional sheet or another reference youave prepered for this
student. We especially welcome a broad-based assessment and encourage you to consider describing or addressing:
A- [he applicantas academic, extracurrtcalar, and personal characteristics.
A- Re~evanta~ntextf~rtheapp~icantasperf~rmancoandinv~vement~suchasparticu~af~es~ffami~ysituation~resp~nsi~i~ities~a~r-sch~w~k~b~igati~ns~sib~ing~hi~dcare~
er other circumstances, either positive or negative.
A- Observed problematic behaviors, perhaps separable from academic pertA(c)finance, that an adrnission cornmittse should exp!ore further.

(~) Has the applicant ever been found responsible for a disciplinary violation at your school from 9~ grade (or the international equivalent) fcrwar~l, whether related to
academic misconduct or behavioral misconduct, that resulted in the applicantas probation, suspension, removal, dismissal, or expulsion from your insgtL~on? 0 Yes 0 No
@ To your knowledge, has the applicant ever been adjudicated guilty or convicted of a misdemeanor, felony, or other crime? 0 Yes 0 No
Not~ that you are not required to answer"yes" to this question, or provide an explanation, if the criminal adjudication or conviction has been expunged, sealed,
annulled, pardoned, destroyed, erased, impounded, or otherwise ordered to be kept senfidential by a court.
If you answered yes to either or both questions, please attach a separate sheet of paper er use your written recommendation to give the approximate date ~f each
incident and explain the circumstances.
0 Check here if you would prefer to discuss this applicant over the phone with each admission office.
I recammend this student:

0 No basis

0 With reserval~on

0 Fairly strongly

0 Strongly

0 Enthusiastically
S [<-2/2D10-11

2010 ~e Common ,~pplfcaf~on,

HARV00018589

DX025.0138

For Entrance in Fall 2011 . SchoOl Report Part II

Office of Admissions and Financial Aid
86 Brattle Street
Cambridge, M_& 02138

Apphc.antas Name:

Please return this form by January

Please Print

Date of Birth:

gecondary School:

CEEB/ACT Code:

To Counselor or School Head:
We have provided this supplement to the Common Application School Report to give secondary schools the opportuni~ to offer further information about their students. You may have already provided this information in your report; we are happy to accept lettels or
photocopied reports and ask only that you staple them to this form. We recognize that not all parts oftkis form apply equaliy to all schools,
and we understand that many court~elors thee extraurdin~,~ily demanding ~vorkloads. We are extremely grateful for your he*.p in assisting
students in the transition fiaem secondary school to college.
Rcpresemafivcs of schools outside the U.S. and Canada should refer to additional note~ and directions provided on the backpage of this
A- form.

The propose of this recommendation is to assist the Admissions Committee in making a decision and, if the applicant enrolls, to ~dd in
making rooming assignments and to assist the studant in other wa2,s. Because inadequate info~Inat[on can sometimes diminish a ~audenras
chances for admission, a full and em~did report is essential. We a~AC/, therefore, for careful ratings and comments about character and ability by a school official who knows the student weiL Your report will be read thoroughly by admissions offico~s and later reviewed by the
Admissions Committee as it votes on the studentas case.
Transcript

You may send us any legible Wanserlpt form or academic record that your school ctroenfly uses. A school profile, including a bfiefcxplanation of your grading ~stem, would be especially welcome. The transcript shauld provide at least the folloan4ng information:
A- Courses taken, years taken and grades, including courses failed or repeated.
A- Courses currently in progress.
A- Indication of honors, accelerated andAdvaneed Placement coarses (if applicable).
A- Test results, such as SAT Reasoning Test, SAT Subject Tests, ACT, AP, IB and PSATo
A- Schools abroad are asked to submit the results or predicted results from their examinations, such as the Ahitur, IB and GCE
A-Levels.
Numerical Rank in Class
We under~tsnd that some schools, as a matte~-of policy, de not rank their students. However the Commbcee feels that it must have some
indication of how the s0zdent has performed relative to c]assmates in order to reach a good decision. ~e appreciate your cooperation in
not92g class size and class rank as nearly as possibIe. (If precise rank is not available, please estimate docile or give some ~ther indicatio~.)

Financial Aid

If the candidate is a U.& altizen or permanent resident mad is plamiing to apply for financi!l aid, please dire~t him or her to immediately
apply for federal laancial aid, including the Poll Grant and for state awards to which the student is entitled if he or she meets the criteria
outlined by the pP.nieipating states (i.e., Connecticut, Dis~ct of Columbia, Maine, Marylend, Mmseehusett% New Hampshire,
Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Vermon0.
lnturaafional applleants should be encouraged to complete the Financial Statement for Students from Foreign Conalrles form and to visit
the Financial Aid Office website: www.faofas.harvardeda to learn more about our financial aid policies and programs.

Disciplinary Actions
and Voluntary Leaves

0 Y~s

0 No

If in the past three yc~s the student has inctwred serious or repeated dlscipEnary action or has ever been dismissed, suspended or separated
fzom sdmoL or placed on probation, or has ever been away from school for a period of more than two weel~, including a leave of absence,
other than school vaeatlons or due to illness, please cheek yes abova and explain on a separate sheet. (PLease note that we ask the same
question of the student a~d need confirmafina and explanation of any such cffenmstanee.) If after you have submitted this form, new cireurustanees alter the studentas statu~ at school, you should notify u~ as soon as possible.
School Report ~ld~ 3 of 4

HARV00018590

DX025.0139

Excegen[
(next 10% this year)

Additional General
Ratings

intellectual curiosity

O

O-

0

o

o

Intellectual creativity

O

-O-

C

o

o

Academic achievement

O

O

0

0

o

Academic promise

0

0

0

o

o

Leadership

0

0

o

o

Sense of responsibility

O

0

o

o

Self-confidence

0

O-- 0

.o

o

Self-reliance

0

O-

0

o-

o

Warmth of personality

O

O-

0

o

Sense of humor

O

O"

0

o

O

O"

0

o

.E.nergy

O

O

0

o

Maturity

O

O

0

o

Initiative

0

0

0

R~action to setbacks

O

0

o

Respect accorded by faculty

0

0

o

oncern for others

.o

o

School R~port: Side 4 ol"4

HARV00018591

DX025.0140

C O MM ON
APPLICATION

TE

2010-11 TEACHER EVALUATION
For Spring 2011 or Fall 2011 Enrollment

TO THE APPLICANT
After completing all the relavant questions below, give this form to a teacher who has taught you an ae, ademio sub]oct (for eAample, English, foreign language, math,
science, or social studies). If applying via mail, please also give that teacher stamped envelopes addressed to each institution that requires a Teacher Evaluation.

O Female
O Male

Address
Number & Street

~ap~rtme~;t #

City/ionia

C~u~rry

8"t~t~/Prev~ce

School you now attend

ZtP/Pe~tal Cod~

CEEBIACT Code

IMPORTANT PRIVACY NOTICE: Under the terms of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), after you matricufate you wi!! have access to this form
and all other recommendations and supporting documents submitted by you and on your behalf after matriculating, unless at least one of the followin~ is true:
1. The institution does not save recommendations post-matriculatiun (see list at w,vw.commonapp.org/FERPA).
2.You waive your right b access below, regardless of the institutiea to which it is senb
ayes, I do waive my right to access, and I understand I will never see this form or any other recommendations submitted by me or on mya behalf.
0 No, I do not waive my right to access, and I may someday choose to see this form or any other recommendations or supporting documents submitted by me
or on my behalf to the institution at which rm enrolling, if that institution saves them after I matriculate.
Required Signature ~

Date

TO THE TEACHER
Th~ Common Application membership finds ~aedid evaluations helpful in choosing from among highly quaiified candidates. You are encouraged to keep this farm
in your private filgs for use should the student need additional recommendations. Please submit your references promptly, and remember to sign below.

Subject Tougl]t

Teacheras Name (MrJMs./Dr., etc.)
Pl~a~ pd~t ~r type
Signature ~

..................... Date

mmMdiyy},y

Secondary School
School Address

Teacheras Phone (

)
Aree Cede

Teacheras E-moil
t~aumber

E~

B~ck~mu~d I~fom~al~on
How long have you known this student and in what context?.
What are the first words that come to your mind to describe this student?.
Ust the courses you have taught this student, noting for each the studentas year in school (lOth, 11th, 12th; first-year, sophomore; etc.) and the level of course difficulty
(AP, IB, accelerated, honors, elective; 1DO-level, 200-level, etc.).

~2010 ~e Common Application, Inc.

TEACRER EVALUATION 1

TE-1/2OlO-11

HARV00018592

DX025.0141

Ratings Compared to other students in his or her class year, how do you rate this student In terms of:

av~r~}

(t~p 10%)

(tot~ 5%)

(l~p 1%)

Academic achievement
Intellectual promise
Quality of writing
Creative, original thought
Productive class discussion
Respect acco[ded by faculty
Disciplined work habits
Maturity
Motivation
Leadership
Integrity
Reaction to setbacks
Concern for others
Self-confidence
Initiative, independence
OVERALL

your classroom.We welcome information that will help us to differentiate this student from others. (Feel free to attach an additional sheet or another reference you may
have preparad on behalf of this student.)

A(c)2010 The Cotr, rnon,~pplicati~n,

TEACHER EVALUATI0~ 1

"J~-2/2010-11

HARV00018593

DX025.0142

COMMON, :

2OlO-ll TEACHER EVALUATION

APPLI CAT ION :,

Spring 2011 or

TE

Fall 2011 Enrl}llment

TO THE APPLICANT

A~er completing all the relevant qes~Jons below, give this form ~ a t~acher who has ~ught you an academic subject (for example, English, foreign language, ~ath,
science, or social studies}. If applying via mail, p~ease also give that teacher stampe~ envelopes ~ddressed to each4ns~tution that requires a Teacher Evalua~on.

Birth Date

Jr,. etc.

M~ddie (tempters)

First/Circe

O Female
0 Male

Social Security #
mm/dd/~vyy

(Optional)

Address
Num5~[ & Street

Ap,lrtment #

Cit~;ZTow~

APSt~te/Prov~t~AC/e

Country

CEEB/ACT

School you now attend

ZIP/Pastel Code

Code

IMPORTANT PRIVACY NOTICE: Under the terms of the Family Educational Rights an~l Privacy Act (FERPA), after you matriculate you wtl! have access to this form
and all other recommendations and supporting documents submitted by you and on your behalf after matriculating, unless at least one of the following is true:
1. The Institution does not save recommendations post-matriculs*Jon (see list at w~commonapp.org/FERPA).
2. You waive your right to access below, regardless of the institution to which it is sent:
OYes, I do waive my right to access, and I understan~ I will never see ~is form or any oth~r recommendations submitted by me or on my behalf.
0 No, I do n~t waive my right to access, and I may someday choose to see ~is form or any other recommendations or supporting documents submitted by me
or on my behalf to the institution at which Iam enrolling, if that institufJon saves them after I matriculate.
Date

Required Signature ~

TO THE TEACHER
The Common Application membership finds eanrlid evaluations heipfut in choosing from among highly qualified candidat8~, You are encouraged to keep this form
in your private files for use should the student need additional recommendations. Please submit your references promptly, and remember ta sig~ below.
Subject Taught

Teacheras Name (Mr./Ms.lDr., etc.)
Signature ~

Date

Secondary School
SchoolAddrees
Nu,~nber & Street

Teacheras Phone (

Off~Toa4,n

Stets/Province

ZIP!Post,! Code

Teacheras E-mail

)

Area Co~o

Cpuntry

Number

Ext.

Background Information
How long have you known this student and in what context.?
What are the first words that come to your mind to descdbe this student?.
List the courses you have taught this student, noting for each the studentas year in school (10th, 11th, 12th; first-year, sophomore; etc.) and the level of course difficulty
(AP, IB, accelerated, honors, elective; lO0-1evel, 200-level, etc.).

=2010 Th~ Common Aoplioalio~, Inc.

TEACHER EVALUATION 2

TE-1/201D-I 1

HARVO0018594

DX025.0143

Ratings Cor~pared to other student~ in his or her class year, how do you rate this student in terms of:

Academic achievement
Intellectual promise
Oual]ty of wdting
Oreative, original thought
Productive class discussion
Respect accorded by facult7
Disciplined work habits
Maturit7
Motivation
Leadership
Integrity
Reaction to setbacks
Concern for others
Self-confidence
Iniliative, independence
OVEPALL

E~!al,aatiort Please wri[e whatever you think is important about this student, including a descripi~on of academic and personal characteristics, as demonstrated in
your classroom. We welcome information that will help us to differentiate this student from others. (Feel free to atf.ach an additional sheet or another r~ferenc~ you may
h~ve prepar~ct on behalf of this student.)

20i 0 Th e ~omrnon Application, Inc.

TF_,~CIaIEI~ EVALUATION 2

TE-2/2010 -11

HARV00018595

DX025.0144

COMMON

MR

2010-11 MIDYEAR REPORT

AP P L [ C AT I O N

For Spring 2011 Or Fall 20 1 Enrollment

TO THE APPLICANT
Nter completing ~11 the relevant questions below, give this form to your secondary school counselor or another school official who knows you better. If applying
via mail, please also give that school official stamped envelopes addressed to each institution that requires a Midyear Report.

O Female

Legal Name

O MaJe
L~st/F~mi/y/s~,r (~ter llame exactly as ff ~ppesrs on oificia! document&)

I~,f~ale (AC/om.plete)

First!Given

B}rth Date

Jr., etc.

Social Security #
mm/d~.vyyy

(Opti~na!}

Address
Number & St,"ee~

Apart,~t #

City/Fol~an

~tate/Pr~in~e

SchooI you now attend

~ountry

ZIP/Posta! Co~o

CEEB/ACT (;ode

Current year courses~please indicate title, level (AP, IB, advanced honors, etc.) and credit value of all courses you are taking this year..Indiuate quarter
classes taken in the same semester on the appropriate semester line,

IMPOI~aANaI" PRIVACY NOTE: By signing this form, I au~odze all schools that I have a~enderl to release all requestud reoords covered under the Federal
Educational Rights and Prffacy Act (FERPA) so that my application may ~ reviewed by the Com~n ~plication member institution(s) to which I am applying.
I fu~her authorizo ~e admission o~ce~ reviewing my appl~atlon, including seasonal staff employed for the sole purpose of ewluating applications, to contaG
offi~als ~ my current and former schools should ~ey have questbns about th~ school ~rms submi~ed on my behalL
I unders~nd ~at under the te~s of the FERPA, after I matriculate I will have access to this form and all o~er recommendations and supposing
submi~ed by me and ~n my behalf a~er matricula~ng, unless at least one of the following is true:
1. The ins~ion does not save recommendations post-matriculation (see list at ~amcommonapp.org/F~PA).
2. I waive my right to access below, regardless of ~e institu~0n ~ which it is sen~
O Yes, I do waive my fight to access, and I u~darstand I will never see ~is form or ~ny ot~er re~mmendaBons subm~ed by me or on my b~half.
O No, I do not waive my right to accsss, and I may someday choose to see this form or any oth~ recommendations or s~ppo~ing documen~ submi~ed by me
or on my behalf to ~e Instl~tlon at w~ich Iam enroillng~ if ~at lnstitu~no saves ~m a~er I matriculate.
~equimd Sig~m ~

. Date

TO THE SECONDARY SCHOOL COUNSELOR
Please submit this form when midyear grades are available (erid of first semester or second trimester). Attach applicant~ official transcript, iooluding courses
in progress, a school profile, and tm nscript legend. {Please ch~ok transcript copies for readability.) Lisa both pages to complete your evaluation for this student.
Be sure to sign below.
Counseioras Name (Mr.tMs.tDr., etc.)
print or b/pe.

Signa,~re %

Date
m~/dd/yyyy

School.

Sch6ol Add~ss
Counseloras Phone ~
)
Area C~de
Secondary school CEEB/AOT code

Counselur~ Fax (
Ext,

)

Area Code

Counselor3E-m~l
MRrl/2010-1I

o 2B10 Th~ Common App!icat~on, Inc.

HARV00018596

DX025.0145

Background Information If any of the information on this page has changed for this student since the Secondary School Report was submitted, please enter th~
new information in the.appropriate section below. If your recommendation for this student has changed, please comment in the space below or on a separate sheet.
If nothing has changed, you may leave this page blank. However, your signature is still required.

Class Size __

Class Rank

Covering a period from __ to

How many courses does your school offer:
AP
tB
Honors
~f school policy limits the number a student may take,
please list the maximLrm eliA(c)wed:
. Honors
AP
-IB

The rank Is 0 weighted 0 unweighted. Bow many students share this rank?
A(c) We do not rank. Instead, please indicate quartile

quintile

docile

Is the applicant an IB Diploma candidate? A(c) Yes A(c) No
Cumulative GPA:

on a __ scale, covering a period from

to
(n;m/y.yyy)

.Are classes taken oll a block scl~LJule? 0 Yes 0 No

~,mm/y2YY)

In comparison with other college preparatory students
This BPA is 0 weighted 0 unwe]ghted. ~e schoolas passing m~k is

Highest GPA in class

a ~t your School, th~ appl!c~antasc6ur~
A(c) most demanding
0 very d~manding
r-A(c) demanding :

Graduation Date
~ml~J/dd/!yyy)

Percentage of graduating class immediately attending:

four-year

two-year institutions

.:

.:A(c) ave]age...
A(c) below average

How long have you known this student and in wh~ context?.
What are the first words that come to your mind to describe this student?.

Ratings Compared to other students in his or her class year, how do you rate this student in terms of:

Academic achievement
A-

i. i

=

Ext[acurr cuter accomphshme~ts
Personal qualities and character

:.

0VEBALE,,-

.

:1:

:.:

Please use this space tn elaborate on any changes in the studentas academic record, personal demeanor, or status atyour school.

~ Has the applicant ever been found responsible for a disciplinary violation at your school from 9~ grade (or the international eqauivalent).ferward, ~d]ether related to
academic misconduct or behavioral misconduct, that resulted in the applicantas probation, suspension, removal, dismissal, or expulsion from your institution? A(c) Yes A(c) No
@ To your knowledge, has the applicant ever been adjudicated guilty or oonvicte~J of a misdemeanor, felony, or ether crime? A(c) Yes A(c) No
Note that you are not required to answer"yes"to this question, or provide an explanation, if the crimthal adjudication or conviction has been expunged, sealed,
annulled, pardo~ed, destroyed, erased, impounded, ur ptherwise ordered to be kept confidential by a court.
if you answered y~ to either or both questions, plsese attach a separate sheet of paper or use your written recommendation to give the approximate date of each
incident and explain the circumstances.
0 Check here if you would prefer to discuss this applicant over the phone with each admission office,
I recommend this student:

A(c) No basis

0 With reservation

0 Fairly strongly

A(c) Strongly

a..
A(c) Er~usiasticatly

HARV00018597

DX025.0146

Helpful Websites

Harvard Websites:

Accessible Education Office I www.aeo.fas.harvard.edu
Advanced Standing 1 www.fas.harvard.edul-advisingladvanced/reqs.html
Advising ~ www.fas.harvard.edu/-advising
Application I www.admissions.college.harvard.edu/apply/forms/
Athletiacs I wwv,r.gocrimson.com
Bureau of Study Counsel I www.bsc.harvard.edu
Career Services I www.ocs.fas.harvard.edu
Counseling Services I wvcw.college.harvard.edu[serviceslcounseting
Courses of Instruction I www.registrar.fas.harvard.edu/fasroicourses
Departments and Concentrations I www.fas.harvard.edu/hometacademics-and-research
Dining I www.dining.harvard.edu
Engineering and Applied Sciences I www.seas.harvard.edu
Financial Aid I www.fao.fas.harvard.edu
Freshman Deanas Office I www.fdo.fas.harvard.edu
Health Services I www.huhs.harvard.edu
international Applicants I www.admissions.college.harvard.edutappiy/international/
Ivy Group Common Admissions Procedure Statement I www.ivyleaguesports.com
Libraries I lib.harvard.edu
Museums I www.harvard.edu/museums
Program in General Education I www.admissions,college.harvard.edutabout]leaming/gen_ed.html
Public Service C~ppor~unities I ~wvw.fas.harvard.edu/-pbhtpsn
Research Opportunities and Student Employment I www.seo.harvard.edu/
Student OrganizatiQns and Activities I www.college.harvard.edu/studenlJactivities
Study Abroad I www.fas, harva rd.edu/-oip
Taking Time Off I www.admissions.college.harvard.edu/applyltime_effl
Visit I www.admissions.callege.harvard,edu/visit]

Standardized
Testing:

ACT I www.act.orglaap/
AP t www.ets.org
College Board I www.collegeboard.com
GRE I www.ets.org
SAT Registration I www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/sat/reg;html
TOEFL I www, ets.org

Applying Online:

The Common Application I www.commonapp.org
The Universal College Application I www.universalcollegeapp.com

HARV00018598

DX025.0147

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARV00018599

DX025.0148

July 4, 2011
Dean William R. Fitzsimmons
Office of Admissions and Financia! Aid
Harvard College
86 Brattle Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
Deea- Mr. Fitzsimmons:
I am a professor at UCLA whose son just went tl~rough your admissions process. As I
contemplate the meaning of America on itg Independence Day, I wanted to write to you regarding
your process. It is agreed upon by most that America is in decline. There are many reasons for
this, but you should not underemphasize the role played by your process in this declhae.
I have serious concerns about the rigor and thoughtfulness exhibited by your admissions officers
in bringing recommendations forward. America is supposed to reward hard work, tenacity, and
responsibility. Your process does not reward any of these attributes. Furthermore, it is
disingenuous to the extreme.
1. The conmmn application asks us to check an ethnicity box assuring that no inforalation we
provide wilt be used in a discriminatory way. It is indeed used iu a discriminatory way. Any
time a standard is relaxed or raised based on a checked box or a last name, thatas wrong.
2. Comtesy waitlisting of legacies is rampant. TbAs is iu nay view unethical. Waitlisting is just
that--you need to be a serious candidate if spots open up. I do not believe that many of these
waitlisted candidates are considered seriously.
3. You ask that applicants consider the most ligorous course loads but tlxis is not a criterion used
to break ties between applicants. What is used instead is some other innate nonacademic talent or
skin color.
In fact, my reading of your process is somewhat cynical but may be close to the truth. Take the
top 5-10% of the class, screen them for legacies, sa!dn color (checked box for ethnieity), and
unusual innate talent for things other than academics, then reach out and pull from the lower
ranlcs to protect your yield.
Let me now tell you a personal story. There was a 22-year old man from India whose household
salary growing up was less than $80 pet month. Hc came on a s~udeut visa to the USA in 1984.
He had one suitcase and less than $3000 in cash on him. He worked hard in grad school, married
an Asian Indian girl who came to the USA also with virtually nothing (basically $0) and lived in a
roach-infested apartment straggling to get by. Treating education as sacred, they both worked
day and night on their doctoral dcgrces, finally becoming Paculty members and leaders in their
respective fields. They had two children and education and being positive contributors to their
conmmnity was emphasized above all in the household.
One of the children ~l

Neclactecl:
PII/SPI

]has the following stats:

1. Highest graduating GPA in h~s public h~gh school of 627 students
2. Toughest curriculmn amongst his peers (11 AP classes)
3. All A grades (even as a second semester senior)

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa

HARVO0018600

EYES ONLY

DX025.0149

4. All SAT scores (including subject tests) at 750 or above
5. All AP scores at maximum (score of 5)
On top of that we have:
1. An athlete who played two varsity sports that are not typical of his
demographic (how many South Asians play varsity volleyball and
basketball?).
2. Leading the news team (news editing) at the school newspaper.
3. Extensively interning at the local city newspaper
4. Wilming three national vaiting awards
5. Extensive volunteering in the eommnnity
On top of that we have the following awards at graduation:
1. Rose Gilbert Academic Excellence Award - the highest honor for overall academic excellence
in the high school
2. Quill and Scroll Society Honorary Memhership Award fox excellence in wlitingijournalism
3. Couununity Service/Volunteering award for more than a threshold level (one hundred hours)
of conununity service at the l~gh school
4. National Merit Finalist

5. California Scholarship Federation Sealbearer (for high Scholastic Achievement aa~d Service to
the Community)
6. Los Angeles Volleyball Coaches Association Academic All Star Player of the Year
7. Califorsfia Department of Education and California Mathematics Com~cil Award for
Exemplary Achievement in Mathematics
Obviously, he loves leanaing. If anything, people in our ettmic group should also get the breaks
in the process. We came barely t~venty-five years ago with virtually nothing. Frequently, we
donat ~sually write self-reflective essays (and by the way, if you want such an essay why not
make it clear?), we .just achieve based on a strong work ethic. What does our kind get in return?
Just the usual demoralizing rej ection, while others get taken or waitlisted. Check the applicants
from tiffs high school t
";~,,"~;~a~
~2alif.) and see if who you took or waitlisted truly
are the strongest academically or are legacies or people with cormections.
-~qaat we learn about the process ia to not honestly report our ethnicity, not honestly report what
we want to do (expressing interest in under-enrolled ma,iots is better), and exaggerate our nonacademic pursuits. We also learn that sldn color does matter, and it would have been a different
outcome had I married someone of a different etlmic group. Is this really the message applicants
should be getting at such a young age?
Hala~ard is first and foremost an academic institution devoted to sc2aolarship. Furthermore, it
receives Federal money. Each NIH or NSF grant fiom which ymx derive overhead comes out of
our tax dellars. Your endowment income, unlike mine is largely tax exempt. The job of
admissions officers is not to get excited or entertained, but day in and day out, just reward people

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018601

DX025.0150

who have achieved at a high level given ~he opportunities they 5ave had. Stellar academic
records with rigorous courseloads do need to either be rewarded or your decisions explained
especially when the candidate is from an over-represented minority group. It seems clear that
when these types do something outside the ordinary in extra-curriculars they are not rewarded at
the same level as others.
As we contemplate involving Federal autlmritics to protest the violation of our civil rights, we
tl~ink the reason your process is contributing to Americaas decline is the lack of candor and
thoughtfalness in your process, and the lack ef tangible rewards for tenacity, intellectual
curiosity, and a s~rong work ethic. We tI~ink America is becmning a joke and this demoralization
will cost the country dearly in the next fifty years as our work ethic erodes. Thatas what it has
come down to.
Sincerely,
Redacted:
PII/SPI
Redacted:

I

PhAdegne:l
Address:

Nedacted:
PII/SPI

I
~ax:

Redacted:
PII/SPI

Cell:l

Redacted:
PII/SPI

Redacted:
PIIISPI
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1481

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018602

DX025.0151

Redacted:

:

"

..

PII/SPI
Pacific Paisadas, CA ~U2/Z

I~l ,,,hl,,JI, ,I,,I,,Ih,I
Dean William R. Fitzsimmons
Office of Admissions and Financial Aid
Harvard College
86 Brattle S[reat
Cambridge, MA 02138

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018603

DX025.0152

ttARVARD COLLEGE

Office of Admissions and FinancialAid

Ja.tly 21, 2011

Redacted:
PII/SPI
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1481

1-)ear I

Redacted:
PII/SPI

I am writing in response to your recent 1citer to me, dated Jnly 4, 2011, whie}~ seems to
assert that Harvard Collegeas decision not to admit your son [~ was a result of ethnic
discrimination. I understand that you disagree with the Committeeas decision regarding your
sonas application. \Vhile there may be nothing i could say" that ~vould alter your opinion, I assure
you that the Collegeas admissions precess is not biased in the way you suggest or in any other
way. Let me take this opportunity to better explain ore" admissions processes and the context in
which your sonas application was reviewed.

As I am sure you realize, admission to Harvard College is highly competitive. This year
a record nmnber of al~plicants (34,950) applied for the 1,662 plaees in the first year class; of
these, we had the capacity to admit only 6.2%. The Admissions Committee, comprising thirtyfive faculty members and a&ninistrators, reviews applications in a pai~staldng process that
stretches over se~eraI months. The Co~nittee can respond only to the various credentials
presented by the candidates in their applications, and members of the Committee understand that
they therefore have a limited knowledge of each student. Nevertheless, the Committee takes
great care in evaluating each of the many applications. Each applicant is reviewed and voted on
by the Committee during its admissions meetings.
There is no precise formula by which achnissio~s decisions are made. The Co~mnittee
considers many factors in the admissions process, including scholarship and standardized testing.
However, the academic credentials of applicants to the Coll~ge in recent years have made the
admissions competition more rigorous than ever. Approximately 48 percent of this yearas
applicant pool presented SAT I scores totaling t400 or higher. Nearly 4,175 scored a perfect 800
on the SAT Mathematics test and over 3,050 recorded an 800 Verba! SAT. As has been the case
for many years, the number of applicants who were valedictoriaz~s of their high schools (3,598)
was more than twice the number of places in the freshman class. This year, 52% of the applicant
pool were in the top ten percent o2"their respective high school classes.
Cominued

Administrative Office 86 Brattle Street - Cambridge, Massachusetts oa~3g
Visitor Cen~er Agassiz House - Radcliffe Yard. Cambridge, Massachusetts o~ ~38

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018604

DX025.0153

Page 2
July 21, 2011
As it does with each candidate, the Committee carefully and fairly evaluated your sonas
application, and concluded that it would not be able to offer him admission. While I understand
that you and your family are disappointed at the outcome, I must reiterate that the Collcge=s
decision was reached properly. You certailfly hkve every reason to be proud of your sonas
accomplisNments, which you detail well in your letter. I hope you will extend to~-~r]my best
wishes for every future success.

and Financial Aid

CONFIDENTIAL

HARV00018605

DX025.0154

July 30, 2011
Dean William R. Fitzsimmons
Office of A dmissions and Financial Aid
Harvard College
86 Brattle Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Dear Mr. Fitzsimmons:
Thank you for yore" letter of July 21. I have a few final points. While I am willing to
consider taking your word that etlmic discrimination is not an issue at Hm-card College, I
am less willing to accept that your process is not "biased in any other way" as you
mention. [~aor example, it has been documented that legacy applications get a personal
and careful read from you, and that to me is bias because they are treated differently.
Furthermore, affirmative action is likely also a reality of your process (and an admirable
one at that).
In any case, you have the right to impose the criteria you want. There is one overriding
concern l have and that is the exact role of etlmicity in the process. Your coimnon
application states that:
"Common Application member institution admission offices do not discriminate on the
basis of racc, color, ethnicit),, national origixa, religion, creed, sex, age, marital status,
parental status, physical disability, learning disability, political affiliation, veteran status,
or sexual orientation."
I thilak the above statement is not accurate because discrimination can be positive or
negative, and certain races and people of certain parental status (legacies) do get treated
differently in the process.
However, let ine get back to how the above quote relates to Asian-Americans and the
matter of deep concern to me. There is nothing more debasing to the dignity of a human
being in a minority group than to be categorized according to a checked box for ethnicity
and then have it held against them, even as ONE A+-hctor. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., in
his "I have a dream" speech did NOT have this in mind. I think it is reasonable and just
to expect an American citizen applicant to be treated race-neutrally or race-positively at
an institution receiving Federal dollars. As you know, my problem is not to do with
affirmative action, but relates to the civil rights of Asian-Americans because according m
Espenshadeas book, they present "stats" higher than those of other races on a~erage, so
for dive~sity reasons they may be discriminated AGAINST. This is an old argument, but
is race relevant for races other thau m~der-represented groups? How would your process
of evaluation t:actor the notion that an applicant checked the Asian-American boxa? What
[ am asking is that since this group is NOT under-represented, is consideration of its race
relevant? If so, why? For example, would the following and similar thoughts be

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018606

DX025.0155

permissible in a meeting about an Asian American applicant: "We know he will tend to
score well in math, what else has he done?"
[Parenthetically, please also be aware that for example, Japanese and Asian Indians are of
different races. We as Asian Indians are basically Caucasian with a darker skintone. The
process should not club us all into one category for admission purposes. This also is
fraught with problems.]
1il sunl, as a final issue, I would appreciate your confirming that for other than underrepresented groups, etlmicity does NOT factor into any admission decisions, discussions,
nor thought processes of admission officers (thus possibly resulting in imposition of
higher standards for Asian Americans). That is, I would like confirmation that Asian
Americans and Whites are treated the same, without any regard for the race box checked
in these cases.
I do apprcciate your thne, and I found your letter to be refreshingly candid and helpful.

Sincerely,

Redacted:
PII/SPI

Los ~Xmgeles, CA 90095-1.481

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018607

DX025.0156

HARVARD COLLEGE

Office of Admissions and Financial Aid
August 3,2011

Redacted:
PII/SPI
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1481
PII/SPI

Dear

Dean Fitzsimm0ns is away, but he has asked me to write in reiponse to your most recent
letter of July 30. Although I doubt there is much ! can helpfully add to Dean Fitzsimmonsa
earlier letter to you, I should like to comment further on a coupte of your APS .ayticular coz~cems.
Our admissions process does not proceed on the basis of Categories, ethnic or otherwise.
As the Supreme Court has repeatedly recognized, college admissions committees may take into
account a variety of personal factors including family backgrotmd--among many others, as they
evaluate and compare appiicants. Our process is highly individualized in its approach; we have
no quotas, targets or goMs in choosing a class. We neither limit nor increase the number
admitted students according to etlmicity, geography, gender or ~eld of study although we do
consider all of these factors. Indeed, it is worth noting that ~he model cited approvingly by the
Supreme Court in both the Regents of University of California v. Bald~e decision of 1978 and the
Grutter v. Bollinger decision of 2003--neither of which involved a challenge to Harvardas own
admissions process---is the "Harvard plan," which, as the Court explicitly recognized, is flexible
enough to consider all pertinent elements for consideration in ea:h a~oplica~ltas case
admission.
As to your concern about applicants being asked to identify their ethnicity, I note that the
Federal Government requires universities to report ethnicity or race of enrolled students.
Accordingly, our application invites, but does not require, applicants to self-identify by selecting
one or more etlmic categories. A student is not required to provide that optional information and
some applicants do not.

I hope you.will find tl~is information helpful.
Yours sincere!y,

Marlyn E. McGrath
Director of Admissions
MEM!alb

Administrative Office 86 Brattle Street. Cambridge, M~ssachusetts o~38
Visitor Center Agassiz Hot~se - Radcliffe 2~uad. Cambridge, I~{assachusetts o~g8

HARVO0018608

CONFIDENTIAL

DX025.0157

}]8/1 }]/2@11

13:2a9

Au~t

FI -lANCE

318286~45,~

PA@E

i0, 20!I

Ms. Ma.rlyn E. McOxatk
Office of Admissions and Financial Aid

Hm~ard College
86 Bra~Ie S~ee~
Camhidge, MA 02138
Dear Ms. McGrath:
Thank you for your let~-r in respon.~.e to n~5a second ]e~t~ to Dean Fi~s~rm?aons. Unferl~r~a;ely,
while [ appreciate your reply and. understand the cireum.qtar~ces in which race car, be considered
from the two landmark eases you men~:ioa I did. not receive a reply to my que.~ions, wlnich are
just. re~asonable, and fair, and describe a saxaight a~swer.
1. As~aming they ideaniB.~ themselves as Asian Americans, arc Asian Am~icart applicants viewed
in the context of the ovcrM1 application pool or within tee pool of o~hez Asian .A~erican
applications?

And two new questions based on your Iett~:

3. Yea indicate that checking an eflmicity box is optional Would failure to cl~eck any
et?micit3* boa be construed as a negative signal (e.g., ~ha.t someoz.e is tTying to tide tkeir
ra eial i de;ttity)?
4. If someone ~.Wth a las~ name i~dicative of e{lmieity, such a~ "Zhar.g" or "Rajara~am"
dce~ ~ot check a~.y eth_nJeig~ box, wo~ld you try ~o infer tee ethrfieity based on the
~ame?
If _vo~. car, answer @ese questions ~ would be dcIighte.d. Otherwise, [ wiI] cojzclude
you do ~net wish to reply. I do not anticipate corresponding further 01! this matter with
yon or Dea~ Fitzsi~no~s regardl.ess of whether 2 receive a reply, a2"hanks once more for
yore- time.
Since.re]%

Redacted:
PII/SPI

Los z~.gAC/les, CA 90095-1481
Cc: Dear. William R. Fir.zsimmons

CONFIDENTIAL

HARVO0018609

DX025.0158

August 22, 2011
Dean William R. Fitzsimmons
Off]co of Admissions and Financial Aid
Harvard College
86 Brattle Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Dear Dean Fitzsimmons:
I couldnat resist writing to you one last time. Consider tim situation. Your director,
Marlyn, is unable to certify, either that Asians and Whites are treated the same in the
process, or that Asians are not viewed in competition with each other. Yotl are unable to
do so as well. There is no reason why Asians and Whites should be treated differently.
In this situation, i suppose I should take your word that ethnic discrimhaation is not all
issue for Asian Americans at Harvard in that they are taaeated the same as Whitesa? Giveu
this, perhaps you should take nay word that as someone who as spent several years in
higher education, and has seen thousands of graduate and undergraduate students, my son
has a curious and extremely tho~@atfid scholarly mind (far more thoughtfi~l than mi~e at
a comparable age), and he wiii prosper at Harvard, and be an active contributor to the
community. My son is of sterling character, has the best GPA in his high school class of
627 studems, with excellent test scores, two national writing awards aa~d one state level
math award, is a two sport varsity athlete, and his editing earned the school newspaper
the most coveted national-level medal. This is all true, but wiI1 you just take my word for
it? I leave this for you to ponder.

Sincerely,

Redacted:
PII/SPI

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa

HARVO0018610

EYES ONLY

DX025.0159

HARVARD COLLEGE I

Office of Admissions and FinancialAid

August 26, 20il

Red acted:
PII/SPI
Los A~geles, California
Dear

I

Neaactea:
PIIISPI

Thank you for your recent letters. At this point, I can only
reiterate what Director McGrath and I &iready have tdld you: Harvard
College conducts a holistic admissions process. Ethnicity is one of
the many factors we consider when evaluating the thousands of
applications we receive (this year the number of applications
approached 3S,000] from a wide range of excellent candidates.
I understand that you continue to be upset that we were tunable to make
a: offer of admission, to your son. We wish you and~m~ every
success as he begins his college career.

~

<cerely,

Dean of-7<dmissions and
Financia! Aid
WRF:oap

Adlnin isl~ative Office 86 Bratfle Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts o.~ 158
Visitor Center Agassiz House - Radcl~h Yard - 5James Street A- Cambridge, Massachusetts o~!38

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYSa

HARVO0018611

EYES ONLY

DX025.0160

01117/2812

83:83

6174958321

O~P

PAGE

January 13, 2012

Dear
[

You will ~:s~aI1 our cotr, spo~denoe f~om last year regarding lily Sorh ~
Redacted:
] appti~a~i0n m H~d Colleg~, I ~ writing to let you ~ow that ~e
DeCadent of Educationas ONca of Civil Nghts ~ info~ed us that ~y haw
aecep~d out AC/o~platnt aBe~g ~t H~rd Uniwrsityas ~dcr~adua~e admtsaio~
f~shman

at[

~aa~tea: [wh~ he ~oatinu~ ~o 5c a promising schol~ ~ he ea~ed a 4,0 in

you already ~w, h~ had the htgh~st GPA of his ~duati~g hi~ ~AC/h~l cl~s ~d ~
~ignifi~t ~AC/cord of ~ional~ stat~ a~d other accomplist~;~ts. Mr. D~ G0~d~, the
author of"~Se Price of Admissions," ~ aw~e ~f thi~ development I believe Nat my ~on~

~ ~m writit3g to ask you if yeu wot~ld like to discu.~s the eaa~ pxior to tha b~gi~ing of the
detailed OCR investigation, I would need you to call m~ a~ Redacted: ]at your e~Iicst
(or you can email me at[
"~u~;~":
Ia Thank you f~ your consideration,
Th~ ma~:~r remain~ confidential a~. ~f now,
giae~-r.ely,

Redacted:
PII/SPI

Los Aageles, CA 90095-I4~I

HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL

-

ATTORNEYSa EYES ONLY

HARVO0018612

DX025.0161